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Do DDVP Strips Smell bad? even after they're gone?

(10 posts)
  1. Stevie

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Wed Mar 3 2010 19:01:02
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    Hi,

    Anything that continues to reek isn't an option, because we're using this for my boyfriend's art, which actually does sell! So we need these to be 100% bb free, and odor free... no one's going to buy a painting that smells like a mothball...

    Someone recommended the DDVP strips to me, or mothballs...

    We were going to seal my boyfriend's paintings up in giant contractor bags, with the DDVP strips in there, for 3-4 weeks. Are there any other options?

    A PCO told me on the phone that steaming them would warp them and they wouldn't do it. Even steaming them would just kill what was sitting on them at the time. Couldn't bb's move in to them the next day?

    Should we use DE and bag them?

    Thanks so much,
    Stevie

  2. spideyjg

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Wed Mar 3 2010 19:17:56
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    I had files boxed for like 8 months with a strip. They smelled kinda chemicalish but citrusy when I opened it but did fade away.

    The smell wasn't obtrusive like mothballs.

    Jim

  3. wchicago

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Mar 4 2010 1:04:35
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    i used roughly a bajillion of them in my living room <long story> and left the room completely tarped off and stewing for 2 weeks. after 1 week of open windows and a fan on <and the room still tarped safely away from the rest of the apartment> when i re entered the room -NO smell. at all. i was surprised at how fast it faded.
    similarly, when i first opened a bag with a sofa cushion and a strip in it to air, i could smell it - like spidey said, unpleasant mix of chemical and citrus. but then, after airing-no smell.
    i wouldn't worry about the bfs paintings -after a week's worth of airing out, they'll be totally odor free

  4. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Mar 4 2010 10:03:05
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    Fumigation or heat would be preferable if they are an option for you. DDVP vapors can get into material and while certainly less odoriferous than moth balls (a progressive stage of beer nuts) it can be bothersome to folks.

  5. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Mar 4 2010 12:52:45
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    Also, just for the record, if applied properly, steam can kill bed bug eggs.

    The problem with art is that even dry vapor steam will damage the paintings; however, if you're using one of the high end dry vapor steamers on other items that can handle those levels of heat, the temps from the steam should kill eggs too.

    But Winston's right; if Vikane fumigation is an option, it doesn't leave a residual smell or substance behind, so it's the go to treatment for items like art and musical instruments that can't handle heat. I don't know where you are; it's not available in Canada, and not every municipality has a Vikane chamber fumigation service (you take your items to them, and they put those items in a chamber and gas them). Heck, not every every city in the US has a pest management pro who'll come out to your home and tent the thing and pump it full of Vikane for several days. (Here in southern California, it's a common drywood termite treatment, so we do have access to structural fumigation.)

    DDVP strips have been rumored to have a corrosive effect on some items, so if the paintings are being sold, I would chose Vikane over DDVP for that reason alone. However, if Vikane isn't available, DDVP is probably the second best bet if you're not willing to seal them up for 18 months in airtight plastic and starve the bugs out that way. You would still need to carefully inspect them afterwards to make sure there weren't bugs or empty casings lest you scare the client who bought them, but that should also kill the bugs.

  6. Stevie

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Mar 4 2010 15:58:36
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    No Vikane here, I'm in Toronto. No thermal treatment. I talked to my PCO yesterday and he said he didn't "go near" the paintings, which is considerate, but... not great. I proposed some of these board suggestions to him and he said he's got an idea, not to worry. He's coming again Monday. Not sure what his idea is. We'll prob do the DDVP thing too, after he's done, to be doubly-sure.

  7. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Mar 5 2010 3:29:29
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    There's another method, used in museums -- Lou Sorkin can tell you about it. PM me for his email.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  8. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Mar 6 2010 20:19:33
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    Hi Stevie,

    Okay, this is what I was referring to, the method Lou Sorkin suggested -- anoxic fumigation. It's used with sensitive items like museum art, musical instruments. It may be costly, I really do not know.

    I could not find the reference originally.

    Details and an email of a provider here:

    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/musical-instruments-1#post-25672

    If the provider is not local to you, he may know others who do this.

    Hope it helps!

  9. bbgirl

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 1 2011 10:35:37
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    For prints or pictures if examining the frames and backs of the pictures shows no evidence of infestation would you recommend going further and removing the paper backing completely to inspect and replacing?

  10. DustinBBKiller

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Mar 1 2011 14:28:11
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    @ bbgirl,

    Yes. Dismantle the entire thing if possible. Better to be safe IMO.

    A few months ago I used the strips in 2 bedrooms next to each other. The house is vacant. I had taped off and sealed the rooms (I of course forgot to seal off the air registers and the "odor" eventually filled the entire home) with 2 strips in each. Removed them after 3 weeks or so. The odor in general was strong through out the home (see above) and was real strong in the 2 bedrooms (makes ya wonder when the label states you can use them in closets/attics/crawls etc... how does the DDVP strip not leak its odor into actual living areas?) only took a day or two to fully air out the bedrooms and once the bedrooms were clear of odor the rest of the house cleared up.


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