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DIY with bug bombs?

(9 posts)
  1. billyfieldman

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Nov 1 2010 20:25:58
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    I understand from reading posts on the forum that it's not recommended to use bug bombs because it would force the BBs to move deeper. Would this still hold if we use bug bombs that contains IGR and residual chemicals?

    I've seen flea bombs that says it will continue to kill fleas for 9 months. Assuming that the same chemicals that kills fleas also kills BBs. If they do continue to kill fleas/BBs for 9 months, wouldn't that mean that even if the BBs moved deeper, when they do come out to feed, they will encounter the residual chemical and be killed?

    I'm thinking that the next time I move, to bug bomb/flea bomb the place as a precaution before moving in. Is this advisable?

  2. AustralianCimex

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Nov 1 2010 22:16:17
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    Yeah, I wouldnt use bug bombs.

  3. Richard_Naylor

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Nov 2 2010 12:30:55
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    I really really really don't recommend using them at all. I have been to lots of infestations which had been closely associated with one bed until someone used a bomb. The result was bugs turning up in every room of the house including the bathroom. I hear what you are saying regarding IGRs but they only work if the bug comes into contact with a high enough dose. They also don't work at all on adults, so you might be able to stop the nymphs developing for as long as the residual effects last, but bedbugs can live about a year. Also, bugs are becoming very resistant to pyrethroids (usually in the bombs). Treating a large area with a low dose only makes this problem worse as it only kills off the least resistant individuals. Fortunately pyrethroids can still kill bugs but they need to be used in high, carefully targeted doses, so that all bugs are killed and you are not just selecting for more resistance.

  4. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Nov 2 2010 12:32:51
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    Our FAQ on this topic.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  5. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Nov 2 2010 12:33:54
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    Richard,

    May I add a quote from your post above to the FAQ?

  6. Richard_Naylor

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Nov 2 2010 15:12:14
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    Hi Nobugs,

    Be my guest.

    Rich

  7. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Nov 3 2010 0:00:14
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    Thanks, Rich!

  8. billyfieldman

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Nov 5 2010 0:31:32
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    Thanks everyone for the replies. Does this mean that there is nothing much one can do to ensure that a new rental is bug free (other than visual inspection) before moving in?

  9. Richard_Naylor

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Nov 5 2010 17:21:27
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    Visial inspection is actually a pretty powerful tool when you know what to look for. Make yourself aware of all the tell-tail signs. Every time a nymph feeds, it moults, leaving a cast skin. Every time any adult of nymph feeds it produces many black and tan fecal spots mostly around the harbourage. Every egg that hatches leaves behind a shiny, opaque shell, usually stuck between two hard surfaces. These indicators degrade extremely slowly, so a thorough visual inspection can potentially tell you about bedbug infestations that have long since been removed.

    If that's not enough reassurance, stick some passive monitors under your mattress. That way you'll dramatically improve your chances of catching a potential infestation as early as possible.


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