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DIY Monitor For Those On A Tight Budget

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  1. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Jan 18 2015 18:37:36
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    Using plain cardboard a DIY monitor may be made essentially for free as pictured here.

    Cut strips about two inches wide and perpendicular or across the corrugations such that the gaps or holes are open to bed bug entry and view when inspecting.

    Cut partially through the cardboard about three inches from one end to create a fold/flap that may be placed under the mattress, sofa or chair cushion to hold the device in place.

    With free cardboard, you can make and place as many as you'd like. Place them on beds, sofas and upholstered chairs, near bed legs, headboards and other such areas.

    Cardboard DIY monitor by paul b11, on Flickr

    Good luck, hope this helps ! pjb

  2. robinsmom

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Jan 18 2015 19:02:23
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    Thank you, Paul!!

    Can plain white paper be glued to the back to create the same effect of the other popular monitor here? Or just cardboard alone?

    I'm not an expert just a dumb struggling bed bugger like every body else.
  3. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Jan 19 2015 7:53:38
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    Hmmm . . .

    This isn't Arts & Crafts but I suppose you could do that if you wish but in my view It's not necessary as you would be able to see any fecal deposits, eggs and/or bed bugs which are on, in, under or beside the cardboard.

    You can also use cardboard which is already white or light colored. Such cardboard is available from various boxes.

    Overall, you want this to be a quick and easy to make device or tool, which it is, and not take a lot of time, effort and expense in creating it.

    And, whether you decide to paste white paper or a paisley print on yours, it won't much matter to the bed bugs as long as the device provides a suitably "grip-able" type surface for the bed bugs to climb and cling to as does typical cardboard.

    Now, do not run with your scissors and carry them pointed end downward !

    Have a nice day ! pjb

  4. KillerQueen

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 12:19:56
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    Nice design! And it's free, perfect!

    Where can I buy one?

  5. loubugs

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 15:24:37
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    I mentioned one many years ago that would be good for school kids to produce. Fan-fold 8 1/2 x 11 inch construction paper in pastel colors rather than white since all stages will contrast against those background colors. Fan fold in 1/2 inch wide pieces and staple one end, use a paperclip on the other. You can cut in half to make 4 1/4 x 11 fans if you want or for that matter, use less folds and cut into 4 equal fans. Staple and clip as suggested. Just have to open the fan to see who's there. I suggest you do this over a container surface, plastic tray, etc.
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/lou_bugs_pix/16271324338/

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  6. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 15:34:11
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    Nice job Lou.

    Can this double as an airplane?

    Do you do origami too?

    If so, show us how to make a dragon.

    pjb

  7. KillerQueen

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 15:39:20
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    Seen it back in the day. Nice work, Lou!

  8. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 17:32:50
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    I can afford the passive monitor invented by David Cain, so that is what I use because it gives me peace of mind. I know Mr. Cain will probably disagree, but if I ever go on “yellow alert” again, I would probably supplement the passive monitors either with more passive monitors . . . or some of these DIY monitors.

    But since this is a DIY monitor thread, I wanted to mention that there have been other posts by Lou and Paul discussing DIY monitors.

    First, however, with regards to the cardboard "monitor" shown . . .

    P Bello -  » 
    With free cardboard, you can make and place as many as you'd like. Place them on beds, sofas and upholstered chairs, near bed legs, headboards and other such areas.

    Paul, are you saying ANY cardboard is ok to use? Or does anyone that wants to use cardboard need to be careful that the “holes/groves” in the cardboard are large enough for bed bugs to fit into? I know bed bugs can be pretty small, so is any cardboard ok?

    Further, here are some additional posts by Lou and Paul discussing the DIY monitors:

    loubugs -  » 
    You can even fold up used socks and place on bed. Fold up small washcloths, non-white preferable, and place on bed, floor near legs of bed. You can first wipe these on your body.
    These will function as potential harborage areas. You have to unfold and examine to see if there are any bed bugs. You might even see fecal material, eggs, shed skins. Check out some pictures of bed bugs on this site http://bedbugger.com/photos-of-bed-bugs-and-signs-of-bed-bugs/ or link to others from there.

    . . .

    loubugs -  » 
    Here's some more info. AF beat me to the posting. Bed bugs will infest clutter and in a cluttered home, you have more potential infestation sites and the potential for a large number of bed bugs. Why don't you try taking washcloths (preferably not white, but pastel colors) and fold them to create harborage areas, but first rub over your neck, underarms, feet to add human scent. You can check them daily by unfolding and looking inside. Place at bed legs, up near your pillow, down at your feet or in other areas of the home. You can fan-fold construction paper (again, not white, not dark) to around 1/2 inch folds and you can cut an 8 1/2 by 11 inch folded strip in half to 5 1/2 inch long. Staple one end, to make a fan and put a paper clip on the other. You now have another harborage system that can be placed as potential infestation site(s). Examine these daily. These can be placed in between the box spring and mattress, under a pillow, etc. You can place double-sided tape on the back of it to place on headboards or on furniture. You can place as is in drawers, too. People have also used corrugated cardboard and cut into manageable size and placed as potential harborage sites. Yes, as pointed out, studies have shown that worn, smelly socks were more attractive than clean, fresh ones.

    . . .

    P Bello -  » 
    There's a number of DIY options that cost little or nothing:
    > Use corrugated paper (i.e. commonly found brown/tan box type cardboard) cut to suitable sizes. You want to cut it across the corrugations such that the bed bugs will have a little tunnel in which to crawl and hide. They really like that and if you look very, very closely, you can see smiles on their tiny faces. Use a razor blade type knife with a straight edge and cut lengths of such cardboard which are sufficiently wide enough, say 2 to 3 inches wide, to provide a hiding spot but not too wide such that you cannot see the bed bugs hiding within by 6 or more inches. Place these in places where you can intercept traveling bed bugs.
    > While you may have thought soiled laundry was something of questionable value, bed bugs like it. NOT the really nasty, we're better off throwing this out and buying new type stuff but sweaty, kinda-sorta just worked out at the gym type soiled laundry. Refer to Lou's post above.
    > Paper straws cut to one or two inch lengths and placed strategically. That is if you can find paper straws.
    > Blocks of wood with a few saw kerf cut grooves in them.
    Remember that bed bugs prefer tactile type surfaces upon which they can easily grip and crawl as well cracks & crevices in which they can hide.

  9. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 17:40:23
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    P Bello -  » 
    Nice job Lou. . . . Do you do origami too?

    Funny!

  10. loubugs

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 18:25:56
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    Nice job Lou.
    Can this double as an airplane?
    Do you do origami too?
    If so, show us how to make a dragon.

    Hi Paul,
    Thanks
    Yes, but it won't fly well, but not as bad as a rock.
    Yes, I do, in fact when I began at the museum in 1978 we had a few people who did it professionally and I learned from them. Mine were always thought to be most lifelike. I made a few models that had appeared on the Holiday Tree, but that was many years ago.
    In case you're interested: OrigamiUSA, formerly The Friends of The Origami Center of America, is headquartered autonomously in New York City's American Museum of Natural History through the generosity of the Museum Trustees. It is staffed primarily by volunteers and maintains the largest origami library in the world, as well as hundreds of diagrams of unpublished models. OrigamiUSA holds classes, workshops and an annual convention.
    Dragon (finished product)
    https://origamiusa.org/gallery-photo/dragon
    And that's one reason why I folded the monitor.
    And you thought that you were just joking around......
    BTW, regular payment is by cupcakes, right Abs (David)?

  11. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 18:41:59
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    P Bello -  » 
    Nice job Lou. . . . Do you do origami too?

    . . .

    loubugs -  » 
    Yes, I do, in fact when I began at the museum in 1978 we had a few people who did it professionally and I learned from them. Mine were always thought to be most lifelike.

    Well of course you do and of course they are! . . . YOU are the AMAZING Lou Sorkin after all!

    loubugs -  » 
    BTW, regular payment is by cupcakes, right Abs (David)?

    Whoa! What? Waaaaait a minute . . . David had nothing to do with those cupcakes . . . Well except for making sure you were going to be where you were supposed to be! (And a lot of good that did me, thanks to the snow!)

    I hope you enjoyed them . . . . and you were supposed to report back as to which was your favorite (for "next" time) (although I know there is no way you ate them all by yourself)!

    Seriously, you are amazing . . . . and thank you for all you do! (Says the everlasting President of your Fan Club . . . AND your favorite student . . . right Lou?!)

  12. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Feb 6 2015 21:55:54
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    Q: "Paul, are you saying ANY cardboard is ok to use? Or does anyone that wants to use cardboard need to be careful that the “holes/groves” in the cardboard are large enough for bed bugs to fit into? I know bed bugs can be pretty small, so is any cardboard ok?"

    R: Yes and no. Here's why.

    Bed bugs are tactile and thigmotropic type critters.

    The online "free dictionary" provides:
    thig·mot·ro·pism - The movement or growth of an organism in a particular direction in response to contact with a solid object.

    Sorry, but I couldn't find the entomologic version of this term. However, as entomology students we learned that cockroaches are thigmotropic which means that they prefer to squeeze themselves into spaces where both their ventral (under) and dorsal (top) body surfaces are in contact with the surroundings. We also learned that bed bugs have a similar preference and are thigmotropic as well.

    Both species develop via gradual metamorphosis and have progressively larger sized life stages as they grow. With gradual metamorphosis the developing young resemble the adults.

    So, "why is this important to this topic?" (You all may be thinking.)

    We need to know and consider this because all the developing immature insects are thigmotropic but they vary in size as they grow. You see, if we were to build a perfectly sized crack or crevice for either a bed bug or cockroach to hide in, one size does not fit all !

    As such, we would need to include various size cracks and crevices to provide an optimal type harborage into which all life stages of these insects would be able to crawl and find a comfortable place to hide.

    We also need to remember that in any "wild" population of these insects that the immature insects far and away outnumber the adults. This is so because they have so many babies in a short period of time such that the quantity of young easily out number the adults.

    Ya know, all this stuff is mentioned because it warrants consideration such that y'all can better understand as we move along despite that it may seem we're getting far afield from the original question.

    So, lets talk about cardboard and paper and bed bugs now.

    Above you asked about "any cardboard". As you may know, there are different types of cardboard but, I'm no cardboard expert so, let's keep it simple and consider just two types: flat and corrugated. We also have paper so, we'll think about paper and cardstock type paper too. Basically, all these materials are paper. For our purposes we're talking about the plain, non-glossy surface style paper and cardboard.

    Paper & Cardstock (i.e. thicker paper):
    Lou showed us his accordion/fan fold paper. Others that work with bed bugs use folded card stock. Folded in this fashion, the paper and cardstock forms numerous V-shaped areas in which the bed bugs will rest and congregate. These V-shaped areas are not ideal but the bed bugs will crawl up into the V and simply "hang out".

    Cardboard:
    Take a few boxes, cut them 90 degrees to the corrugations such that you can see the hollows. You will likely find that these hollows are of various sizes.

    Now, if we choose cardboard with small size holes then only bed bugs of that size or smaller will be able to fit into the holes. If we choose cardboard with larger sized openings then this will accommodate more different sized bed bugs up to the size of the hollows.

    (to be continued)

  13. WhatBugs

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 7 2015 11:23:21
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    I started using this type (the corrugated cardboard) of monitors a few months ago (from a P Bello post). Even placed with the channels vertical they provide a place for the buggers to harbor. To check them I shine a flashlight (torch) on the surface below them, then look down through the channels from above.

    When bugs are found the monitor gets tossed into the fireplace. One could also seal it in a zip lock bag and toss it in the trash.

    The reason for prompt (and destructive) disposal is eggs. It is easy to use a straightened piece of coat hanger to chase any bugs out, but there is always the possibility of eggs having been laid. Would defeat the whole purpose if allowed to hatch.

    When cutting the cardboard I use a sharp single edge razor and a small metal straight edge. This provides clean edges without the bits of fluff or crushed channels. The pieces of fluff can make it look like there is a BB in there when there isn't.

    WhatBugs?

  14. Richard56

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 7 2015 11:31:19
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    WB: When bugs are found the monitor gets tossed into the fireplace. One could also seal it in a zip lock bag and toss it in the trash.
    -------------------
    Are you saying you've caught bugs in your monitor, or is this just in theory? If you caught bugs, how soon after you installed the monitors did you find them and what is the status of your infestation -- treating, have treated, etc. Thanks.

    Richard

  15. librarybookgrl

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 7 2015 11:47:47
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    This might sound like a stupid question, but in the picture are we looking at the side of the mattress?

  16. WhatBugs

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 7 2015 12:41:52
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    librarybookgrl - 52 minutes ago  » 
    This might sound like a stupid question, but in the picture are we looking at the side of the mattress?

    Mostly the side of the box spring. The mattress is above it where the top of the monitors are folded over and stuck between the box spring and mattress to hold them in place.

    WhatBugs?

  17. WhatBugs

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 7 2015 12:55:18
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    Richard56 - 1 hour ago  » 
    WB: When bugs are found the monitor gets tossed into the fireplace. One could also seal it in a zip lock bag and toss it in the trash.
    -------------------
    Are you saying you've caught bugs in your monitor, or is this just in theory? If you caught bugs, how soon after you installed the monitors did you find them and what is the status of your infestation -- treating, have treated, etc. Thanks.
    Richard

    Oh, I've caught a bunch already. At first knocked them out with the coat hanger wire. I keep the BB's in small zip lock bags with the date on them. When they started to lay eggs in the bags was when it dawned on me that there could be eggs in the monitors.

    Started to 'catch' them within a day or two of placing the monitors. Before this I was inspecting the underside of the wood bed frame every day for them (and from time to time finding them). I purposely left the outer underside of the frame DE/CimeXa free just for this purpose.

    Those areas are now dusted with the CimeXa.

    The infestation started over a year ago, being a newbie it took some time to get it under control. After that a bug or two would show up every couple of days. This past Nov/Dec even went for over 2 weeks with none being found (and no bites).

    Then they showed up again, and I found this:

    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/hundreds-of-bbs-in-one-5-hour-shot

    Since then I've gotten 3 BB's from the passives. The last one is dated 1/23/2015, so a bit over 2 weeks ago. Give it another month or two and I'm home free!

    It is really, really, really nice being able to sleep through the night.

    WhatBugs?

    P.S. thanks to all that contribute here...

  18. robinsmom

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 7 2015 12:59:15
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    Holy moly WhatBugs,
    If you're having this much success you better believe I'm going to try this...

  19. ItsJustABug

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 7 2015 13:26:54
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    I'm going to use it also , I've yet to find another sign of BB's but keep getting bite reactions.
    This way I will be able to find out if they are here or not, and just exactly were they are as to what rooms need more focus..
    Thank you so much for monitors I can afford to put just about every place..I'm doing a happy dance!

  20. Richard56

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 7 2015 13:32:31
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    WB: The infestation started over a year ago, being a newbie it took some time to get it under control. After that a bug or two would show up every couple of days. This past Nov/Dec even went for over 2 weeks with none being found (and no bites)
    -----------------------------
    Well, good to see that the monitor works but what's with the year long infestation?

    Do you have a local source issue? If not, I don't think your treatment approach is very effective. My understanding is that three or four treatments (on the outside) are usually all that are needed, So if we spread those treatments out two weeks apart, say 2 months.

    There is no reason you should have to be living with the problem for an entire year. If it's a local source problem, and you can't do anything about it, and you're willing to live with the problem, then I guess treating in a "green" way for some relief is understandable. But if it's not local source, then you really should re-think your treatment strategy and/or bring in a pro. By this time what you should be finding in those monitors is nothing, zilch, zero, nada, zip.

    Richard

  21. ItsJustABug

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 7 2015 13:48:34
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    @Richard:
    You missed this part of his update he linked to tell his story.

    WB:
    Back up a little, a 'guest' moved in back in Feb of 2014. He was told we had BB's and to inform us immediately if you see any in your room or any where else.

    Fast forward to a week ago, after having them show up every couple of days to a week or two in the passive monitors on our bed. Monitors are checked daily, no screwing around with this, they should be gone by now.

    I took our bed completely apart and found absolutely nothing. No signs , no nests, nothing. The room and furniture have been checked on a weekly basis with again, nothing found.

    I did this work myself, spending many hours and knowing what to look for. So why are we having this on going issue?

    Then I see a CO2 trap in the 'guest room.' WTF?

    I'm informed that there are BB's there and he has been self treating. A bigger WTF! I check and the room is seriously infested. Get him out of here, now! Why, why are you so stupid as to not let us know? Well, your stupidity cost you a place to live. LPR, if you read this, now you know why.

    Richard:
    In the words of the great late Paul Harvey & now you know the rest of the story , Good Day

  22. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 7 2015 23:56:36
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    (Dear whatbugs, thanks for sharing your experience above with this technique.)

    (Continued)

    Cardboard Monitor Trap Width:
    When cutting corrugated cardboard for purposes of making your own free monitor traps, it is useful and practical to make them no more than about two inches wide.

    This is so because a width of about two inches makes it easier to view into the hollows where bed bugs and eggs may be hidden. If more than about two inches then it may become difficult to view within and all the way through the hollow.

    Cardboard Monitor Trap Length:
    The determination of the length of your cardboard monitor trap is up to you but should be based upon what seems most practical for your local conditions. Consider the following when deciding upon length:

    > Where you intend to place your cardboard monitor trap.

    * If on your bed, you will need to make it long enough to provide a suitable fold or flap which may be placed between the mattress and box spring to hold the device in place. The cardboard length below the fold need not extend beyond the bottom edge of the box spring.

    * If on your sofa or upholstered chair, the above concept would apply. Further, these slices of cardboard may also be placed vertically between sofa and/or along side cushions.

    * If placing on floors, a greater length and greater number of placements will increase the chances that bed bugs may be intercepted.

    Placement Location Areas:
    Bed frame
    Mattress
    Box spring
    Sofa
    Upholstered chair
    Along walls & baseboards
    Alongside bed & furniture legs

    Depending upon how sturdy your corrugated cardboard may be, these may also be placed horizontally between/under mattresses and upholstered cushions.

    Documentation:
    Maintaining a log of your monitor trap activity is a sound pest management practice. Pertinent information to record includes but may not be limited to:
    > Location
    > Date placed
    > Date bed bugs discovered
    > Quantity of bed bugs discovered

    Hope this helps ! pjb

  23. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Feb 8 2015 13:21:09
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    Since you asked:

    > The cardboard in the original photo above is approximately 2 inches wide by approximately 12 inches long.

    > It is folded to create an approximately 3 inch long flap.

    > The flap is folded such that it is placed between the bottom of the mattress and the top of the box spring which is what you're seeing in the photo.

    Let me know if any other questions.

    pjb

  24. Richard56

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Feb 8 2015 14:03:12
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    IJB : You missed this part of his update he linked to tell his story.
    ---------
    OK. Thanks. But the principle is still the same. You don't keep treating for an entire year. At some point a long long time ago they should either have brought in a PCO for whole house inspection, inspected himself, and/or looked into other local source issues. And hopefully he will turn to a pro if the monitors start picking anything up again. I am a big DIY guy but it takes a lot of research and effort to do it right, and in most cases here I see it being done wrong.

    Richard

  25. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Feb 8 2015 16:10:11
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    "IJB : You missed this part of his update he linked to tell his story."

    What?

    pjb

  26. Richard56

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    Sun Feb 8 2015 16:38:00
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    It was quoted from and addressed to "IJB" which is short for the previous poster named "ItsJusrAbug", not to be confused with "pjb"

  27. ohpleasenobugs

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Feb 8 2015 21:58:28
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    Thank you all for the helpful suggestions and DIY recommendations!!
    P. Bello: what happens when you don't have a box spring and just the mattress? Where should I place these strips?
    Thank you!!!!

  28. P Bello

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Feb 9 2015 0:09:07
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    Dear ohplease,

    This depends on the configuration of your mattress, i.e. how is it set up?

    > Platform or futon style?

    > Is it on the floor?

    > Is it on a cable & spring type net/matrix?

    Please advise, happy to help.

    pjb

  29. WhatBugs

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    Mon Feb 9 2015 7:20:05
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    Here is too is just a mattress and is on what would be a platform. There is finished wood pieces placed low that surround the mattress to hold it in place.

    I placed the monitors at the head board end, one on each side, on this finished frame. Used two pieces of looped masking tape to hold them in place. In this case I placed them so that the channels are vertical, with no bends or such, just flat pieces about 2" X 4" in size.

    WhatBugs?

  30. WhatBugs

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Feb 9 2015 7:26:58
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    Richard56 - 17 hours ago  » 
    IJB : You missed this part of his update he linked to tell his story.
    ---------
    OK. Thanks. But the principle is still the same. You don't keep treating for an entire year. At some point a long long time ago they should either have brought...
    Richard

    Thank you so much for dragging pjb's thread so far off topic. Not knowing a single thing about what was going on here, and what efforts were being taken, you have no right to say/post whether I am doing things correctly or not. Let alone deride me.

    WhatBugs?

  31. ItsJustABug

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Feb 9 2015 9:22:09
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    @ WhatBugs
    I"ve read your story before & after the battle & then your guest moved in & the battle started over correct? The guest was self treating their room & didn't tell you, you found hundereds of BB's roaming the room correct?..
    I think some how Richard miss something in the two parts of the story,where it came together.
    I'm trying shine a light on it for him ,but he may have to read you story again to catch it..
    I didn't think he was chastising you on DIY treatment ,just missed the connecting 2 part story..
    Now back on topic to PJB's post .I hope

    @ Richard here is the before & after 1st year on WhatBugs ordeal, if you want to re-read it might help mend the rip between you two... hope that helps..
    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/hundreds-of-bbs-in-one-5-hour-shot

    @PJB I for one thank you So much for the detailed info & time you gave to this thread.We will even be making this application at work I think after showing it to my Boss ,..It's just too easy for them to turn down, So God bless Ya! Bugs at work have been a huge stress for all the staff.

  32. Richard56

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    ItsjustABug: I'm trying shine a light on it for him ,but he may have to read you story again to catch it..
    I didn't think he was chastising you on DIY treatment ,just missed the connecting 2 part story..
    ---------------------------------------------------
    First, thanks for the mediation. Always nice when someone tries to constructively bridge some differences.

    But actually, I did read the 2 part story (including the unfortunate guest situation) before my last post, and stand by my opinion.

    Basically all I was saying was that if a DIY treatment isn't working in a reasonable amount of time, then one does not continue treating in a similar manner, but rather should step back and reevaluate the situation and/or let a pro come in and do it.

    In this case, it turned out to be a roommate issue, that could have been uncovered a lot earlier had the whole house been inspected either by "Whatbugs" or a PCO.

    That said, I probably could have worded things better, and apologies to "Whatbugs" if some of the comments came off derisive. Hopefully, other DIY'ers will read beyond my wording and get the gist of the message.

    And, now, hopefully back to the actually topic of the thread, which Paul has so generously given his time and efforts to.

    Richard

  33. ItsJustABug

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    I am excited that after an email to my boss,with info & photo's, she is interested in using this application of monitors to check for activity . Thanks Paul its a start from the nothing system they were installing..

  34. KillerQueen

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    ItsJustABug - 1 day ago  » 
    I am excited that after an email to my boss,with info & photo's, she is interested in using this application of monitors to check for activity . Thanks Paul its a start from the nothing system they were installing..

    Good luck!!

  35. ItsJustABug

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    @KQ
    Thanks, we will need all the good luck vibes we can get..
    Staff walks around eyeing everyone for reaction marks,while trying to act like they aren't, lord forbid some one has a new pimple :-).People have quit over the bugs.
    So many have there have the ItsJustARoach type attitude.
    But my main 3 concerns are:
    1-protect the defenseless elderly.
    2-not to transport any home, because then I can focus on #1
    3-refer to 1&2, And eradicate BB's in the building.
    Its had gotten to the point management wouldn't seem to look me in the eyes when we talked. In fact avoided conversation. Mostly because I just won't let go. "What are they doing about it" to protect all of us.
    Paul &Lou's monitor ideas seem to open up a new avenue for communication on the subject.
    This forum is a vase wealth of information.

  36. scorchedearth

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    P Bello, thanks for the DIY monitor. As far as bed bug behavior goes, with a small infestation in a boxspring or night table, would the bb's move into the monitor that's closer to the feeding source, or are they more likely to return to their old "crib" after their meal?

  37. P Bello

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    Dear scortched,

    There may be any number of reasons that a bed bug decides to harbor or hide where it does.

    However, bed bugs excrete or deposit an "aggregation pheromone" which is a chemical message that signals other bed bugs where an acceptable hiding place is located. As such, I would expect that the tendency would be for the bed bugs to primarily return to the established harborage areas.

    Recent research developments include the production of a synthesized aggregation pheromone(s) which may be used to draw bed bugs to a certain monitor device. These artificial pheromones were discussed in research presentations at the Thermal Remediation conference in Dallas this past week. In the near future I will post notes from that meeting.

    Overall, cardboard works for the reasons listed in the above thread.

    Let me know if any additional questions or concerns.

    pjb

  38. scorchedearth

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    Dear P Bello,
    Another question: Should corrugated cardboard be considered contraband in our house from now on?

    I have a number of cardboard bankers' boxes containing document files (have not got around to scanning these. plus am loathe to get rid of hard copies of IRS stuff). These boxes have never been in the infested room and we also had house vikane-ed a month ago. As mentioned in another thread, fuming was not completely successful and we've had a followup spray/dust treatment.

    Watched the video of yours, very informative. Thanks for taking the time to help us all with this pesky problem.

  39. P Bello

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    Dear scorched,

    A few comments for your consideration:

    > Keep the storage areas neat and tidy to reduce pest issues.

    > If need be, you can seal the bankers boxes inside large plastic bags to keep any wondering bed bugs and/or roaches out.

    > You can always change out the bankers boxes for plastic bins but that might be costly to do.

    > If you had your home fumigated and you have remaining pests, it seems that you should have a warranty on that work. I'm thinking that you should be looking to pursue the warranty of a fumigation application.

    pjb

  40. P Bello

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    OK. Since you asked, we often see bed bugs & eggs either on, under or alongside those "do not remove under penalty of law" type tags on mattresses and box springs here in the US.

    As such, when placed between a mattress & box spring these cardboard strips may/will provide bed bugs an acceptable harborage area. Note that if the purpose is to "detect the presence" of bed bugs, it makes no difference if the bugs, eggs, shed skins found are in, on, under or alongside your DIY FREE monitor device.

    Plus, did we mention that they're FREE and do NOT cause cancer !

    Have a nice day! Pjb

  41. Nobugsonme

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    Do you fellows have any photos of such traps? Ideally new ones as well as ones with samples or evidence present. I would be happy to make this into a FAQ, but some images would help.

    Thanks!

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  42. Richard56

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    NB: Do you fellows have any photos of such traps?
    ----------------------------------------------------------

    Paul has a clear image in his first post, and instructions for making the monitors in a subsequent post. As I understand it, these are literally not "traps", but monitors since the bugs are free to come and go, but maybe I've missed something along the way.

    Richard

  43. P Bello

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    I'll post additional information on this in the near future.

    pjb

  44. Nobugsonme

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    Richard56 - 9 hours ago  » 
    NB: Do you fellows have any photos of such traps?
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    Paul has a clear image in his first post, and instructions for making the monitors in a subsequent post. As I understand it, these are literally not "traps", but monitors since the bugs are free to come and go, but maybe I've missed something along the way.
    Richard

    Thanks-- I can see Lou posted a photo also. You're right that trap isn't accurate.

  45. GhangisKong

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    Thanks everyone, about this DIY passive monitor.

    And, drum roll please, the magic question is, how often is reasonable to replace this DIY passive monitor for bed bugs for those who do not want to check for any signs of insects harboring within?

    Do these get replaced daily, every other day, weekly, monthly...?

  46. P Bello

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    Hmmm . . .,

    We need to remember the purpose of these things first is to detect the presence of bed bugs.

    Ideally, you're looking to see if there's any bed bugs on, in, under or adjacent to these. If so, you implement control work.

    Now, is it possible to control bed bugs via "monitor removal/replacement" alone? Not so much.

    Note that while we'd expect to remove/kill the bed bugs found within or on the monitor, to assume that we're going to attain 100% control via this method ALONE is assuredly niave and wrong headed out of the real world type thinking for all infestation cases.

    Pjb

  47. GhangisKong

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    Thanks, P Bello. I agree, it would seem highly improbable to remove 100% of bed bugs from an infested place using passive monitors, alone.

    Let's say one wants to use Cimexa, passive monitors, and frequent decontaminating laundering, what time frame do you recommend the passive monitors be removed and replaced at a place where a heavy infestation (3 new bites nightly) exists?

  48. P Bello

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    We need to be careful when we're deciding certain things.

    For example, while we may wish to check/inspect the monitors say once per week, we need not discard them unless there are bed bugs and/or eggs present.

    Additionally, if your home has "zero" bed bugs but you discover bed bug(s) in a monitor, you may have actually controlled or removed the infestation by discarding and replacing the monitor properly. However, the cost of these FREE monitors allows this to occur in an affordable fashion. Nevertheless, this is a narrow window of opportunity in which this method/strategy will operate successfully.

    Pjb

  49. GhangisKong

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    Great, thanks P Bello! Your tips are great!

    And thanks for the info that we may want to check the monitors weekly for signs of a new or ongoing infestation.

  50. Nobugsonme

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    GhangisKong - 8 hours ago  » 

    And, drum roll please, the magic question is, how often is reasonable to replace this DIY passive monitor for bed bugs for those who do not want to check for any signs of insects harboring within?

    I am confused. If you don't want to check them for signs, why would you even have monitors in place? The entire purpose is so you can detect the presence of bed bugs.

  51. GhangisKong

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    Great question, nobugsonme. To clarify - in the event that someone knows they have bed bugs, and would rather not risk the bed bugs running out of the passive monitor while it's being checked, how often is reasonable just to chuck the monitor into a bag and dispose of it rather than checking the tunnels.

    I'd rather just check the outside of the monitors periodically for fecal spots / other evidence and not check the inside tunnels. I think there's a risk of bugs running out from the tunnels in the corrugated cardboard when shining a flashlight or moving the monitor to check it. Therefore, I'd rather just check the outside of the monitor, chuck and replace from time-to-time rather than risk bugs escaping the monitor (a partial trap).

  52. Richard56

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    Paul recommends cutting the monitors to a width of no more than 2" for easy inspection. You can inspect them with flashlight over a large plastic basin or bathtub if you're concerned about a bug getting loose. That way, as NB's suggests, you'll also get a better monitoring of the situation.

    Richard

  53. P Bello

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    We also want to be careful when handling these items once deployed because there may be live bed bugs or eggs on or in them. As such, we do not want to handle them haphazardly even if you've already decided to discard them. It would likely be best to carefully remove them by placing directly in a suitably sized sealabe container or plastic bag.

    Be careful out there kids ! Pjb

  54. GhangisKong

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    Thanks, Richard56 and P Bello, for the tips on how to properly dispose of these passive monitors/traps without running the risk of the bugs running for cover before they make it into the fire pit, get run over by a MAC truck, or just tossed in a dumpster.

    Sending you rainbows and unicorns. (gotta just laugh)

  55. bed-bugscouk

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    Hi,

    While the statement below is correct for the state of the device that is being discussed on this thread is is not correct in a wider context:

    P Bello - 2 days ago  » 
    Now, is it possible to control bed bugs via "monitor removal/replacement" alone? Not so much.
    Note that while we'd expect to remove/kill the bed bugs found within or on the monitor, to assume that we're going to attain 100% control via this method ALONE is assuredly niave and wrong headed out of the real world type thinking for all infestation cases.
    Pjb

    The reason for this can be seen back in 2006 when I started looking at monitoring as a method of early detection to enhance treatment efficiency. We started playing around with simple cardboard based devices such as this but found that by modifying and optimizing the efficiency of thus crude approach could be enhanced. This is not surprising since the outline of what is discussed in this thread is not new, it is in fact covered in a 1916 (or 1917) patent application although that erroneously also makes claims about blood and bone meal being attractants of bedbugs.

    The optimization that followed resulted in a product which has passed the patent-ability test and is acknowledged as both a patented method and a product which is quite rare for any form of patent to be covered in both aspects. It was actually the differences between what is outlines above and what was shown to the patent office that resulted in the grant, namely the fact that the limitations of a piece of cardboard is that you cant actually see activity without close inspection and as such it is not really a monitor at all.

    One of the best illustrations of this is the image below which shows a Passive Monitor which was installed at assessment of a previously treated property. We offered only advice and isolated a picture from the wall where we found two live samples.

    TbyPMR by davidcain4, on Flickr

    The removed monitor was then sent to an academic lab where it was dissected and documented.

    As you can see from the image there are clear faecal traces on the detection skirt which indicate that there is bedbug activity. The dissected monitor also shows activity and while the extent of the issue is present from the detection skirt it would not have been present had it not been in place.

    There was no treatment needed in this case because the advice on avoidance that was given isolated the occupants from the "local source" and the Passive Monitor removed the current remaining population.

    I have also helped people in other countries to do this approach by making the Treatment by Passive Monitor Replacement protocol available online.

    Hopefully this will explain to others why you are correct in the statement that using your approach it is unlikely to work but that is not the say that its not possible if you follow the advice that you personally consider to be "out of the real world".

    It was also mentioned by many of the US academics at the Denver meeting this year that bedbugs have not been shown to move out of existing harbourages and into any monitoring devices. Well the video that illustrates this being done in the real world is embedded below:

    https://youtu.be/32iJfVUIlaQ

    [+] Embed the videoGet the Flash Videos

    In fact this was shot as a result of some previous claims you made about this not being possible or feasible.

    I also know that you have previously been sent information confirming these sort of results and to date I believe I am the only person why has signed testimonial letters from clients confirming that we have been delivering such solutions to hotels without guest complaint for multi years.

    Its not the first time we have seen someone make an assumption about how simple the product appears only to find out later that its not as simple as you think. If it were simple I would have stopped the development at a much earlier stage and it would have been feasible to have a set of instructions that people could have downloaded and followed. This also explains why we have seen so many boom and bust products hit the shelves for bedbugs because simple ideas do not always work int he way you would hope.

    Regards,

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  56. P Bello

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    YIKES !

    The above post has been flagged for the following reasons:

    > It is a blatant sales pitch that contains misinformation.

    > More to follow, stay tuned . . .

    Have a nice day ! pjb

  57. Nobugsonme

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    P Bello - 3 hours ago  » 

    The above post has been flagged for the following reasons:
    > It is a blatant sales pitch that contains misinformation.

    Paul,

    You wrote previously,

    P Bello - 2 days ago  » 

    Now, is it possible to control bed bugs via "monitor removal/replacement" alone? Not so much.
    Note that while we'd expect to remove/kill the bed bugs found within or on the monitor, to assume that we're going to attain 100% control via this method ALONE is assuredly niave and wrong headed out of the real world type thinking for all infestation cases.
    Pjb

    That post from you does not specify that you're only referring to the DIY monitors suggested by you, Lou, and KQ in the thread above. It seems to include in its umbrella an implied reference to David's Treatment by Passive Monitor protocol.

    Moreover, the entire thread seems to be suggesting DIY passive monitors are as effective as or do the same things as the product David invented. It seems reasonable that he should be able to respond to that implied claim also.

    I would also note that at no time during the two months this thread has been active has David jumped in to argue for the relative value of his product. That might have been a problem. However, in this case, he's responding to implied claims you're making about his product.

    Calling David's post "a sales pitch" isn't really accurate, no moreso than your posts supporting the effectiveness of Nuvan Prostrips, or other products you've been involved in testing or developing. I think you understand that. I am not going to forbid David talking about a product he invented and uses. It's not in the same ballpark as someone posting on the forum with a link to their product, which isn't allowed, or telling us to go out and buy their service/product.

    I hope this clarifies matters for you and others. If not, please send me an email.

  58. Richard56

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    NB: That post from you does not specify that you're only referring to the DIY monitors suggested by you, Lou, and KQ in the thread above. It seems to include in its umbrella an implied reference to David's Treatment by Passive Monitor protocol.

    Moreover, the entire thread seems to be suggesting DIY passive monitors are as effective as or do the same things as the product David invented. It seems reasonable that he should be able to respond to that implied claim also.

    NB: Calling David's post "a sales pitch" isn't really accurate, no more so than your posts supporting the effectiveness of Nuvan Prostrips, or other products you've been involved in testing or developing.
    ------------------------
    But the thread is titled and about 'DIY'. That is the whole point of the thread. Saving money over existing products that cost more. No where does Paul say his product is better than the commercial one, he simply says what it does and of course, mentions that it is free. So what
    is a paid product doing in the thread?

    And I understand why Paul calls this a "sales pitch" because David has been promoting this product multiple times on a daily or almost daily basis, as well as Bed Bug Blue. That being a product which he sells on his web site and the same product that is manufactured by the same person who sells (or licenses) the U.S. Version of bbalert passive. I would like to see that disclosure whenever he mentions Bed Bug Blue, as by any definition there is a definite
    business relationship not being disclosed.

    AND even his disclosure statement reads in part like a sales pitch, the sentence starting with "Since
    2009..." Now, I've never seen a disclosure statement like that one and suggest it should be amended with that sentence stricken.

    It reads -- (again note sentence starting with "Since 2009..."

    "In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bedbug infestations in domestic and commercial settings. The patent numbers are GB2463953 and GB2470307."
    -------------------

    Lastly, it's no secret that Paul and I have tumbled a little over DDVP vs Rag in Bag, so when I say that Paul's occasional mention of DDVP Strips on a scale of 1 to 10, is about a "2 "versus David's "10", it comes from someone who has been on opposite sides of the issue with Paul.

    I may not agree with Paul all the time on that, but he has never come off anything like an infomercial, he's just laid out the arguments as he sees it.

    Richard

  59. Richard56

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    NB: NB: That post from you does not specify that you're only referring to the DIY monitors suggested by you, Lou, and KQ in the thread above. It seems to include in its umbrella an implied reference to David's Treatment by Passive Monitor protocol.
    -----------------------------------------------------
    I missed that one in my previous post.

    Here, Paul is simply answering a question, and stating that is not how these monitors work. I don't see how that opens the door to letting in a bbpassive promo, photo spread, and all. I think that would be better served in a new thread discussing the concept.

    Richard

  60. Nobugsonme

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    Richard56 - 43 minutes ago  » 

    No where does Paul say his product is better than the commercial one, he simply says what it does and of course, mentions that it is free.

    As I noted,

    Paul said,

    P Bello - 2 days ago »

    Now, is it possible to control bed bugs via "monitor removal/replacement" alone? Not so much.
    Note that while we'd expect to remove/kill the bed bugs found within or on the monitor, to assume that we're going to attain 100% control via this method ALONE is assuredly niave and wrong headed out of the real world type thinking for all infestation cases.

    When Paul references "monitor removal/replacement" method, he seems to be referencing and subsequently critiquing David's protocol. (Referencing someone who would use such a method as "out of the real world type" seems like a reference to David's "out of this world" sig line also.)

    So I do stand behind this moderation decision. Further discussion of the marketed passives should probably continue on another thread if it happens, though I think direct responses to what was in David's post are appropriate.

    As for this:

    And I understand why Paul calls this a "sales pitch" because David has been promoting this product multiple times on a daily or almost daily basis, as well as Bed Bug Blue. That being a product which he sells on his web site and the same product that is manufactured by the same person who sells (or licenses) the U.S. Version of bbalert passive. I would like to see that disclosure whenever he mentions Bed Bug Blue, as by any definition there is a definite
    business relationship not being disclosed.
    AND even his disclosure statement reads in part like a sales pitch, the sentence starting with "Since
    2009..." Now, I've never seen a disclosure statement like that one and suggest it should be amended with that sentence stricken.
    It reads -- (again note sentence starting with "Since 2009..."
    "In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bedbug infestations in domestic and commercial settings. The patent numbers are GB2463953 and GB2470307."
    -------------------

    I think this is a valid query, but it doesn't seem relevant to this thread, so please copy it to a new thread (which you may link to here) for further discussion.

    I realize everyone is not going to agree on moderation decisions but it's a lot harder than you might think in some cases to implement forum rules. I am doing my best to be fair to all.


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