Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » General Topics

DELUXE HAND WARMER BLOOD TRAP

(39 posts)
  1. NYDweller

    newbite
    Joined: Dec '09
    Posts: 55

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Jan 6 2010 15:42:57
    #



    Login to Send PM

    DELUXE HAND WARMER BLOOD TRAP

    they want blood? give em blood:

    1) Obtain a large flat sticky rat or insect trap

    2) put a flat piece of thick paper or thin cardboard as an island in the middle of the trap
    (or a small flat cardboard box for candy cut in half)
    The sticky glue must be around the island on all sides

    3) On the island in the middle place an activated hand warmer (small packet of powder that warms when you shake it for about 10 hours-also possible CO2 release.)
    -the purpose of the island in the middle of the trap is so you can easily remove the hand warmer and keep using the sticky trap. If you stick the hand warmer into the center of the trap without this island you can't take the hand warmer off again.

    4) Take a small cap from a water bottle and put some blood in it and place that cap also on the island in the center of the sticky trap either next to or on top of the hand warmer.
    Get the blood from a piece of raw chicken.-Vampirish but effective

    5) place the trap under the bed near to under the head of the bed where your head is.
    Or put the trap on the bed if you have space, duct tape first, then put the trap on and then the warmer and blood.
    Beware these sticky trap are very easy to brush against and it sticks to you or the bedding

    6) Repeat the process each day or every other day for up to two weeks replacing hand warmer and blood.
    To stock the blood pour a small amount of fresh blood from a piece of meat and divide it in portions into an ice cube tray. Then periodically take out a piece of the frozen blood and put it into the cap that's on the trap.
    Why for up to two weeks? Because the bed bugs can become sated after they bite you and not show up again for a while.
    Too squeamish to be freezing chicken blood like this? Well just eat the chicken then and hope for the best.

    7) Turn off competing devices in the room like clocks which produce heat (or have a Vaseline covered base that the clock sits on that the BB's won't go up)
    If possible turn off room heat also to improve attraction to trap. Remember to put a few inches of Vaseline onto top of bed legs to prevent climbing up. There must be no sheets or covers hanging over the edge of the bed and the bed should be a least several inches away from a wall.

    ALTERNATE VERSION OF TRAP:

    Use Climbup Bug Interceptor dish (or upside down dog bowl set up like a climbup) instead of sticky trap.
    In the center the interceptor dish or dog bowl use the hand warmer and blood baits

  2. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,203

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Jan 6 2010 15:51:27
    #



    Login to Send PM

    This is not a good plan.

    Where do you get the idea that blood attracts bed bugs?

    They are attracted to C02 + heat and certain pheromones. And in fact, we do have a FAQ explaining the hand warmer trap idea. However, as noted in the yellow "alert" box at the top, there are better, easier methods available now which were not around when that FAQ was written.

    That FAQ directs readers to additional advanced detection ideas in this FAQ, and suggests the ClimbUp interceptor as a potentially better trap idea, and it's cheap. Active monitors are even better, though they can be pricey (like the Nightwatch) or risky on other levels (like the new Dry Ice trap). However, all of these are proven to work well.

    I appreciate your enthusiasm for trying new ideas, but please do not post plans which are experimental, not based on science, and not proven to work well (and better than other options). And that goes for this thread too.

    You've got some sucker out there taking blood from chickens for no good reason. Not cool.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  3. BBcoukHome

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jan '08
    Posts: 1,166

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Jan 6 2010 16:53:54
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Chickens blood
    Next someone will be posting Hungarian songs to ward off the evil bugs.

    Sometimes you need to apply a lot of logic to the issue before you start to design experiments. We know bed bugs feed on blood, preferentially human blood but they are not too fussy to be honest. We know that blood is on the inside of animals. We know bed bugs have adapted mouth parts to pierce and suck fluids from within the cellular layers beneath the skin. QED it is most likely that it is the characteristics of the body and the skin that attract the bed bugs rather than blood because they cant get to the blood until they start to feed.

    I am at this stage for the sake of all the readers going to point out that the next step in this logic is not to cut your own skin and bait a trap, nor is it to use any animal skin as a substitute.

    It is a combination of things that makes a live capture bed bug detector effective but as others have said to fine tune a system takes time and a lot of experimental data collection from multiple test sites and scenarios. Bed bugs are rarely a one size fits all type problem.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

  4. NYDweller

    newbite
    Joined: Dec '09
    Posts: 55

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jan 7 2010 4:03:19
    #



    Login to Send PM

    @Nobugsonme

    1) It’s redundant for you to mention the Climbup which I already mentioned at the bottom of my initial post.

    2) A Climbup is only good if the person is sleeping in the bed as bait.
    Therefore when a person is not in the bed, at work for example, placing a hand warmer in the center of the Climbup or sticky trap is superior to just the Climbup alone when a person is not in the bed.
    Climbup is not cheap for what it is. It’s a cheap piece of plastic and in most cases they rip you off buy forcing you to but 12 of them for $57.95 (US)

    3) You mention the Dry Ice trap and say that it’s “proven” better than the hand warmer trap yet there is very little apart from anecdotal data to support this so called “proof” on this brand new trap idea. Keep in mind that the trap is based on an upside down dog bowl and not the Climbup.

    4) There’s no reason a heat source cannot be integrated with the dry ice trap

    5) To monitor in a situation where bed bugs may have been sated and in retreat for a week or two, one may have bait such traps several times over several or all days in this period to give a fair detection. Therefore replacing the dry ice in the dry ice monitor can be a lot more expensive than replacing a one dollar hand warmer (which may also give of CO2.)
    Again both baits at the same time would be best.

    6) You suggest that I am suggesting that a person goes and finds live chickens and extracts blood from them and that is “not cool”
    I suppose you are a vegetarian who never buys chicken from a supermarket that has blood in the package as millions of other humans being do and that I am suggesting people go to a chicken farm running around with syringes.
    What’s the difference between killing a chicken and killing a bed bug anyway? Bed Bugs are smarter than chickens that’s scientifically proven.

    7) You said
    “Where do you get the idea that blood attracts bed bugs?”

    I apologize; I just came up with that idea completely at random. I was thinking of various random liquids like milk, orange juice and blood and flipped a coin a few times and it chose blood. I mean where would anybody get such and idea that bed bugs might be attracted to blood? What was I thinking?
    It’s been proven with live bed bugs that when chicken blood is placed near them they ignore it. Oh, wait a minute was that proven?
    @BbcoukHome, “most likely” is not proof.

    always leave everything to the professionals, they are in control

  5. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,203

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jan 7 2010 13:16:37
    #



    Login to Send PM

    NYDweller - 8 hours ago  » 
    @Nobugsonme
    1) It’s redundant for you to mention the Climbup which I already mentioned at the bottom of my initial post.

    Not redundant at all. You suggest ClimbUps plus a bunch of other stuff including stuff that may not do anything whatsoever, like chicken blood.

    My suggestion of "ClimbUps" is quite different.

    2) A Climbup is only good if the person is sleeping in the bed as bait.
    Therefore when a person is not in the bed, at work for example, placing a hand warmer in the center of the Climbup or sticky trap is superior to just the Climbup alone when a person is not in the bed.

    Yes, but I am suggesting people use methods SUPERIOR to your sticky trap and handwarmer.

    Climbup is not cheap for what it is. It’s a cheap piece of plastic and in most cases they rip you off buy forcing you to but 12 of them for $57.95 (US)

    And I suggest that getting people to buy chickens is a colossal waste of money. Can you see how you're causing people to waste time and money?

    3) You mention the Dry Ice trap and say that it’s “proven” better than the hand warmer trap yet there is very little apart from anecdotal data to support this so called “proof” on this brand new trap idea. Keep in mind that the trap is based on an upside down dog bowl and not the Climbup.

    By "proven," I mean a scientist at Rutgers created this trap and tested it under laboratory conditions using the scientific method.

    The method is not published yet, but has been presented on at a conference. I would like to see the published work, however, it certainly carries far more weight than untested methods, including those using murky ideas about how bed bugs operate.

    4) There’s no reason a heat source cannot be integrated with the dry ice trap

    There's no evidence it's needed either.

    And there may be reason not to add heat. I mean, if you have a picnic in a cooler, and you want it to stay cold, do you put a handwarmer next to it?

    5) To monitor in a situation where bed bugs may have been sated and in retreat for a week or two, one may have bait such traps several times over several or all days in this period to give a fair detection. Therefore replacing the dry ice in the dry ice monitor can be a lot more expensive than replacing a one dollar hand warmer (which may also give of CO2.)

    Except the hand warmer method is not all that effective, from the information we have (which is made up of anecdotal reports).

    A pest pro (Sean Rollo of thebedbugresource.com) suggested the hand warmer method to us. A long time ago when there were no proprietary active bed bug monitors, no ClimbUps, and no scientifically-tested dry ice monitor. People have tried it. Without the chicken blood, mind you. It can work. But I don't think it is very effective. And I doubt you have much basis for claiming it is. And you have given no evidence that the addition of extracted blood will help.

    6) You suggest that I am suggesting that a person goes and finds live chickens and extracts blood from them and that is “not cool”

    You are entirely missing my point. Dead or alive, you are encouraging people to take blood and use it as bait. With no grounding for your assumption that bed bugs are attracted by the scent of blood. There's no science in your suggestion. It is not cool to encourage people to follow a plan including steps which are pointless and time- and money-wasting.

    always leave everything to the professionals, they are in control

    No, I am not a professional and I would not say this is true.

    This site is made up of a lot of knowledge -- things people who are not pros tried and even invented themselves.

    However, it's important to me and most other people here that we do not encourage people suffering from bed bugs to waste their time.

    This means using methods proven to work best.

    This means not suggesting things with no scientific basis (like using extracted blood from any animal or human to attract bed bugs; we do have evidence they're attracted by traps using pheromones, CO2 and heat). Chicken blood may be cheap, but you have given no evidence that it attracts bed bugs, so if I follow your plan, you may have just wasted my time and money.

    The ideal is that people get suggestions and support to help them with their bed bug problems for the minimum amount of money, and to solve the problem as quickly as possible.

    If you do not like that ethos, then please go away.

  6. NYDweller

    newbite
    Joined: Dec '09
    Posts: 55

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jan 7 2010 16:25:00
    #



    Login to Send PM

    The Climbup? -what if they're already in the mattress or frame? Your Climbup comes up zero yet your back's itching. The Climbup, what a godsend

    I am going to have to post the data from Penn State's Entomology Dept. where bed bugs were drawn to chicken blood/pieces of chicken meat

    -I'm warning you

  7. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,203

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jan 7 2010 16:48:25
    #



    Login to Send PM

    NYDweller,

    If you have scientific data to back up your claim, I am completely open to it. That's my point.

    But please cut the attitude.

  8. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,203

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Jan 7 2010 17:15:51
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Is this what you're referring to, NYDweller?

    http://www.reeis.usda.gov/web/crisprojectpages/211644.html

  9. NYDweller

    newbite
    Joined: Dec '09
    Posts: 55

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Jan 8 2010 2:46:21
    #



    Login to Send PM

    yes chickens are also under threat from bed bugs

    Mr. Roelofs and Dr. Rutz are doing exemplary work in semiotchemical monitoring models

    -if one is into flesh, by all means use bloody flesh as bait rather then blood alone. then we'll try to isolate the compounds to make it palatable for the public
    -cook and eat the leftovers in order not to waste good meat

  10. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,203

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Jan 8 2010 15:17:40
    #



    Login to Send PM

    NYDweller - 12 hours ago  » 
    yes chickens are also under threat from bed bugs
    Mr. Roelofs and Dr. Rutz are doing exemplary work in semiotchemical monitoring models

    We know chickens are bed bug hosts.

    Would you please link to a source which says that chicken flesh or chicken blood works as bait?

  11. NYDweller

    newbite
    Joined: Dec '09
    Posts: 55

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Jan 8 2010 15:41:16
    #



    Login to Send PM

  12. NYDweller

    newbite
    Joined: Dec '09
    Posts: 55

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Jan 8 2010 16:00:13
    #



    Login to Send PM

    @Nobugsonme

    do you have live BB's specimens or can easily obtain them?

  13. spideyjg

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 3,240

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Jan 8 2010 16:01:46
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Link is coming up snake eyes for me.

    Can you double check?

    Jim

  14. spideyjg

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 3,240

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Jan 8 2010 16:55:44
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Assuming this is true the best source would be a tub of chicken livers. Used to buy them for catfish bait and there isn't a bloodier product in the typical supermarket.

    For you cajun food fans chicken livers are integral to Dirty Rice.

    Jim

  15. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,203

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Jan 8 2010 17:13:22
    #



    Login to Send PM

    NYDweller,

    http://ento.psu.edu/extension/research/bed-bug-chemical%20attractant/115644.html brings up a "page does not exist."

    Could you please check the link?

    No, sorry -- I'm not a researcher and I do not have access to bed bugs for testing.

  16. NYDweller

    newbite
    Joined: Dec '09
    Posts: 55

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Jan 9 2010 1:27:10
    #



    Login to Send PM

    UPDATE:

    If you use a sticky trap you need a strip of thick paper bent the long way-a 45 degree incline to serve as a very short ramp above the sticky part of the trap.
    The paper should have a surface slightly roughened with sand paper. This is so the bed bug will go onto that strip of paper and then fall or jump onto the sticky trap which is only about a quarter inch below this strip of thick paper. This is because the glue on these rat traps is thick. Without this lead in the bed bug might not venture onto the sticky part or touch it very very slightly, realize it's stickiness and then pull away from it.
    The old style roach trap the "roach motel" works like this. There is a lip to the box that acts as a short 45 degree ramp. The roach crawls up that short lip and jumps or slides down a short distance into the glue on the other side inside the box.
    Creating a top or cardboard tent shape over trap is also good so if you brush up against it accidentally you don't get the trap stuck to you.
    The upside down dog bowl works in a similar way. The outside is coated with masking tape for easier walk up . The inside wall is dusted with a little talcum powder so the bug can't climb back out.

  17. cilecto

    oldtimer
    Joined: Aug '08
    Posts: 4,085

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Jan 9 2010 9:48:46
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Tried various tweaks of the URL. Nothing.
    Searched PSU's site on "bed bug". Nothing.
    Googles "Penn bed bug chemical attractant". Nothing.
    Until Dweller responds with a valid URL, assume this paper does not exist.

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  18. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,203

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun Jan 10 2010 16:49:09
    #



    Login to Send PM

    cilecto - 1 day ago  » 

    Until Dweller responds with a valid URL, assume this paper does not exist.

    My thoughts also.

  19. heavyrocker

    Account closed
    Joined: Jan '11
    Posts: 36

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sat Jan 22 2011 22:43:08
    #



    Login to Send PM

    How bout putting the blood ina small bag,instead of a small cup,this would be close to real person or chicken...i think NY DWELLER is on to something.

  20. victimized

    new username: help_me
    Joined: Nov '10
    Posts: 305

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 23 2011 3:18:01
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Heavy,
    I think so too.

    Having given in and purchased three of the nifty little inventions people have concocted to monitor, detect, and trap bed bugs.... someone obviously just had a really good simple idea. These are not fancy contraptions in the slightest and they are making money off them! Just little pieces of plastic, cardboard, etc.

    Great ideas start somewhere and yes, I was thinking chicken livers as well. I personally enjoy eating these very much and they are very very bloody.

  21. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,203

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 23 2011 3:25:16
    #



    Login to Send PM

    victimized,

    Sometimes the solutions are simple.

    I am all for the invention of new tools. Tools which are proven effective.

    However, suggesting people go out and obtain chicken livers, blood, etc. to "bait" bed bugs, as the earlier poster did -- when there is no proof that this will attract them -- is a time and money waster.

    And the last thing people fighting bed bugs need is to waste more time and money.

  22. victimized

    new username: help_me
    Joined: Nov '10
    Posts: 305

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 23 2011 4:21:13
    #



    Login to Send PM

    With all due respect,
    [center]Don't forget that most of here ARE suffering with bed bugs. We are exhausted, frustrated, broke, and desperate for new ideas. Those who have tried everything with no luck and have run out of ideas can either sit around waiting for someone else to come save them or try to figure things out. I personally have tried at least one item that so far has been useless. $20 it cost me for a sliver of cardboard on a sticky thing and so far it doesn't do anything so there is a waste of time and money right there. It was placed correctly too, not everyone is a dummy. We come here for ideas and some are willing to experiment with new ideas so if isn't a waste of time or money for them then go for it!

    Personally, I got the impression NYDweller was simply sharing his ideas with the people here, the knowledgeable, for discussion. Sorry to say it but stop being such a bully! You always seem to have a negative answer for anything people post here, me included. Naysayers are not exactly what people need either.

    If this sight is a liability to you in that you worry that everything little thing people post can cause you a lawsuit in the event that as a result of the information posted here back fires in one's own hands maybe you should just close it down. This is a pattern I have been seeing a lot and it isn't nice. There is a difference between being cautious and such and just plain being negative. You can watch your bum and look out for the members here while still not being so bossy.

    It's very insulting to many of us when it is constantly insinuated that we don't know what we are talking about! If the professionals were half as smart as they are perceived to be on here then there would be a great many more success stories than there are at present. They say to call the professionals for bed bugs yet many of us here know way more than the people we are encouraged to hire. What gives?

  23. EffeCi

    oldtimer
    Joined: Feb '09
    Posts: 1,938

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 23 2011 5:34:50
    #



    Login to Send PM

    It's very insulting to many of us when it is constantly insinuated that we don't know what we are talking about!

    It may sound insulting, but it's sadly true.

  24. cilecto

    oldtimer
    Joined: Aug '08
    Posts: 4,085

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 23 2011 10:37:07
    #



    Login to Send PM

    @Franco: That's mean.

    @Victimized:
    I believe that Nobugs was commenting on NYDweller, not you. She generally rebuts a post only when it's particularly bad. The original post was not written as "speculative", wondering about his approach. He presented it as "definitive", ie, "this is what you should do". It even included what looked like links to academic research, but which were just for show.

    The web is the "wild west" when it comes to BB information. The "helpful", but really bad, stuff people post "all over" on BB is astouding (scan the comments that people post after a BB related article in the general web media). "Just put a bucket of dry ice in the room and it'll trap them all". "Just buy a foam mattress, they can't get inside", "place a fern leaf under the mattress", "spray dianatomical earth all over everything". In some cases, it's people being sincere, but not understading the full story. Sometimes, it's people with stuff to sell. Unfortunately, sometimes it's disturbed or malicious people deliberately posting bad ideas. NYDweller's history on this board was of the latter variety.

    The great thing about this forum is that it includes frightened people posting at 2AM that they don't know what to do next as well as professionals like David Cain or John Furman and academics like Lou Sorkin. This site is actually cited as a useful resource by government and university guides to bed bugs. Keeping a site relevant that way requires some work. That means weeding out spam and calling out posts that are egregiously misleading.

  25. Beth

    account closed
    Joined: Jan '10
    Posts: 598

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 23 2011 13:49:23
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I don't know about chicken blood, but eh, I don't know about a piece of cardboard with sticky stuff on it either. Chicken blood is cheaper.

    Regardless of the usefulness of the chicken blood hand warmer idea (I'd imagine there is a foul odor), victimized brings up a good point. If the pco's know so much more than those of us who have been fighting them, why are so many treatments failing? I'd wager I hear about as many self-treatment and moving success stories as all the thermal, vikane and pesticide treatment stories combined on this site. After about 3 months battling these things and doing research, one can adequately self-treat. That does not mean they will win, much like getting 6 sprays of poison all over your home does not mean you can win.

    Unlike victimized, I don't feel insulted when the pco's suggest we are idiots. I know what training it takes to be a pco, and it ain't much. Now are there a handful of "bed bug experts". Yes. Are they available in your town? Probably not. Do they always succeed? No.

    What I do feel however, is the need for this dicsussion to be a lot more open. For pco's to accept input from "laypeople" who fight these things. Some of us have degrees in biology or work in building or have a handful of other expertise that make us very good resources for ideas on how we can go about beating these things. A pest control license does not a bed bug expert make.

    In fact, bed bug experts get into disagreements all the time about best strategies, often refuting one another, such as in the bed isolation idea or when to caulk, if at all, or which chemical is most effective. A very famous entomologist came up with the hand warmer idea yet now it is said to be not so effective. This reminds me of doctors who claim a medicine is better because it is "new" (like zyprexa over thorazine or cipro over penicillin) when (1) it may not be necessary and (2) it may not be any better and five years from now you'll hear that report (along with the harm it's caused). The evolution of professionalism that has gone along with exponenetial capitalism is tiresome. Anyone with an IQ above 100 (so count George Bush out) can learn how to fight bed bugs rather quickly. The issue is privatization of knowledge so professionals can retain their source of income. Nothing horrible about that, generally, unless you're speaking of a national health crisis and insect epidemic that is affecting people in their homes. Then we damn well have the right to information and treatment options, including all of the pesticides professionals use in all 50 states and how to use them, and affordable non-toxic treatments. This is a right to safe housing issue and at some point I wouldn't be surprised if the public revolts against the pesticide and pest control lobbies, as well as the government's refusal to fund more research (like shutting down NYS IPM) and sues individual states on violating housing laws.

    Whatever happens, I don't think it will be a group of pest control officers who find the solution to this. It will either be an introverted chemist or a natural health expert who will come to the rescue, as well as the government with funding for research and treatment.

    I think pco's get a bad rap not just because with bed bugs they are often ineffective, but their demand to be called "pco's" rather than exterminators emanates from an issue of class, and wanting to rise above the working class lifestyle, which many of them were in and are in. That's fine. The lady who came to treat my place I bet makes $12 an hour. I respect the coal miner's struggle in the Appalachians and all of that, and I'm sure some pco's will be declaring worker's comp when they begin getting cancer from exposure on their jobs, but what I don't get is why the public, I'm assuming it's hysteria, is believing this "only a pco can fix this" stuff.

    Frankly, it's just not true, and they fail it seems to me as often as the idiots they are treating I guess.

    There is no god here, but bed bugs. And that's what I'd like to see being fought, not a war against the intelligence of clients.

    Amy

  26. BBcoukHome

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jan '08
    Posts: 1,166

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 23 2011 15:32:09
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    No wishing to wade into a debate but to clarify for those who arrive late chicken blood is not an attractant of bedbugs they hunt based on CO2 and heat to select a source of food.

    Wherever this thread gets derailed to I just want to make sure we all understand "enough of the chicken blood".

    If you must know why this does not work read the 1916 and 1918 set of bedbug patents.

    David

  27. cilecto

    oldtimer
    Joined: Aug '08
    Posts: 4,085

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 23 2011 15:41:21
    #



    Login to Send PM

    @David: US or UK patents? Thx.

  28. BBcoukHome

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jan '08
    Posts: 1,166

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 23 2011 15:47:25
    #



    Login to Send PM

    US, have copies in the office if you email me just don't have them at home.

    Dates are from recall but there are only 3 or 4 in the 1900's to 1920's with some funky technical drawings that take a double espresso to get your head around them.

    David

  29. DougSummersMS

    oldtimer
    Joined: May '07
    Posts: 1,957

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 23 2011 17:25:49
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I think any monopolistic patents on placing a live pig or chicken in the bed would have expired by this point... likely to be much more effective than dead chicken livers for baiting a trap.

    Of course, gaining PETA's support might be rather tricky....

  30. EffeCi

    oldtimer
    Joined: Feb '09
    Posts: 1,938

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 23 2011 20:29:47
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I suggest naked rats... they're hairless and the skin is really hot...

    About chicken livers:

    Don't know the effect on BBs, but I'm more than sure than, in the hot season, it will be more than effective for blue/greenbottle flies, from some miles far.

  31. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,203

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 23 2011 20:37:16
    #



    Login to Send PM

    victimized - 16 hours ago  » 

    Sorry to say it but stop being such a bully! You always seem to have a negative answer for anything people post here, me included. Naysayers are not exactly what people need either.

    victimized,

    I am sorry you do not like how this site is run, or my opinions. I'm sorry that you think my attitude is negative, but in my opinion, it does not help people to encourage them to experiment with things which are known not to work (see David's comments about chicken blood).

    I also think it is wrong to offer "solutions" which are untested, which is what the original author of this thread did.

    I started this site because I had bed bugs. I know what it's like. People told me to do some pointless things (like throw lots of stuff away, which was a big recommendation back in the day) and I lost a lot because of it. It is not good to see other people wasting energy, time, or money.

    I also hear from lots of people who employ tactics which are recommended by people who don't know a whole lot about bed bugs, and who end up regretting it.

    Remember that my comments are never only directed specifically at you. Even if I am responding to one of your posts, I am also writing for other people who happen upon the answer.

    You are personally welcome to take or leave my advice, but I am not going to stop offering my opinions because you call me names.

  32. Beth

    account closed
    Joined: Jan '10
    Posts: 598

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 23 2011 21:39:02
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I agree with nobugs on the point of not wasting people's time or money on something unproven and likely to fail. As chicken blood hand warmers would seem to be.

    I don't think I'd want to see you naked, EffeCi.

    Amy

  33. EffeCi

    oldtimer
    Joined: Feb '09
    Posts: 1,938

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Jan 24 2011 4:25:23
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I did'n propose a strip tease of me... I simply said that a naked rat should be more effective, as a living bait, than a pig or a chicken.
    And easier to handle and keep.

    Naked rat is a particular hairless strain of Norway Rat, and is usually kept as a pet.

    BTW
    I made experiments with hand warmers from 2005 to 2007. I used even a coal powered one, that produces both heat and CO2. They're not effective....

  34. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,203

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Jan 24 2011 12:54:52
    #



    Login to Send PM

    To respond to Beth's comments, a PCO did originally suggest the hand warmer in a sticky trap idea (without blood or chicken livers). I believe he said it sometimes worked. I don't think anyone ever claimed it was hugely successful.

    This was before BBAlert Passives, ClimbUps, or Bed Bug Beacons, or the DIY dry ice trap were available, and the only monitors beyond a simple glue trap which were available were Nightwatch and the CDC 3000, both very expensive. Many of us were being told to use simple glue traps -- again, not very effective.

    So at the time we did pass on the instructions for how to do it. But once cheap monitors became available which seemed to be more effective (active or passive), we stopped promoting this idea.

    If it was effective and people were having lots of luck with it, I would still be recommending it. But I am not getting any feedback which suggests it is.

  35. Beth

    account closed
    Joined: Jan '10
    Posts: 598

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Jan 25 2011 11:44:05
    #



    Login to Send PM

    sorry Effe Ci, I misread what you wrote.

    carry on-
    Amy

    ps your video on steaming was very helpful. Do you steam carpets as well? And what is the best method? We tried putting a thin cloth over the steam mop so as not to disperse the bugs but it did not get the carpet hot enough. I guess unless we spent 8 hours steaming our carpets. Any other advice?

  36. EffeCi

    oldtimer
    Joined: Feb '09
    Posts: 1,938

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Jan 25 2011 13:19:36
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Beth - 1 hour ago  » 
    sorry Effe Ci, I misread what you wrote.

    carry on-
    Amy

    I wonder in what way... lol
    At any rate, a strip tease of me is something I would not recommend so carelessly...

    ps your video on steaming was very helpful. Do you steam carpets as well? And what is the best method? We tried putting a thin cloth over the steam mop so as not to disperse the bugs but it did not get the carpet hot enough. I guess unless we spent 8 hours steaming our carpets. Any other advice?

    I'm really happy if it was helpful, but keep in mind I use a different kind of steamer, that lets out "overheated dry steam" at 180°C/356°F.
    Can't say about carpets, because I never found an infested one in last 7 years, but I suppose that treating a carpet it's not so different from a moquette or similar items.

  37. DougSummersMS

    oldtimer
    Joined: May '07
    Posts: 1,957

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Jan 25 2011 16:47:44
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Actually, one might imagine that a naked entomologist would be the ideal bait for an active bed bug monitoring device... The world's first BB monitor with a built-in pest identification system

  38. EffeCi

    oldtimer
    Joined: Feb '09
    Posts: 1,938

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Jan 25 2011 16:57:34
    #



    Login to Send PM

    DougSummersMS - 8 minutes ago  » 
    Actually, one might imagine that a naked entomologist would be the ideal bait for an active bed bug monitoring device... The world's first BB monitor with a built-in pest identification system

    Oh, I did it... there's a post about sleeping in an infested room...

  39. really

    newbite
    Joined: Feb '11
    Posts: 3

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Feb 27 2011 23:09:18
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Warmed chicken blood is effective for feeding bb’s, they are fed through a product “Parafilm”. It resembles human flesh but has the texture of Saran Wrap.
    However, blood is by no means an attractant to bb’s.
    Order of attractants are (strongest attractant first)
    1) CO2
    2) Heat (90-100 degrees)
    3) Human scent
    [i]Hope this clears up the post


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

281,545 posts in 46,823 topics over 143 months by 20,658 of 21,555 members. Latest: ykngrggpus, DoIHaveBB, Dread Bugs