Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Bed Bug Treatment

decontamination questions

(14 posts)
  1. bugzd

    newbite
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 11

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Jul 6 2008 16:20:12
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi Everyone.

    Another NYC dweller with an infestation.

    We have been exterminated and haven't been bit in a few weeks, and we are preparing for an out of state move (already planned before hit with the plague).

    Some questions i hope readers can weigh in on....

    Please keep in mind, we prefer to err on the side of caution and paranoia than cut corners....

    *Is drying alone (30 min+) sufficient for killing bugs and eggs in clothing? Is it necessary to wash on hot before drying or is washing an unnecessary step?

    *Shoes-- along with the previous question-- should drying them for 30-60 min be sufficient? Some exterminators recommend treating shoes with pesticides (ie Steri-Fab).

    *Opinions on electronic items? Two exterminators I have spoken with say that I should not worry about my computers, cameras, and hard drives and that bugs would not be in there. Thoughts on this?

    *We are moving everything in plastic bins. Should we treat the outside of the bins before putting them into the moving truck, or does this seem unnecessary? If yes, any recommendations? Over the counter pesticide? Alcohol? Hot water?

    *My electronic items are currently sitting on metal shelves, in the hopes that if any bugs are in there they will crawl out and cross poison. Does it seem better to keep these items close to the bed or in the next room over? I would think that if close to the bed they might be more likely to crawl out, but that they would also be more likely to hide back in there. Thoughts on this?

    *When we move, we are planning on using our backyard as a staging area to further decontaminate items. In general, is using an outdoor area fairly safe if a distance away from the house? Or can bed bugs do fairly well outdoors?

    Thank you everyone in advance. And thank you so much for this site-- I'm not sure if I would have much sanity without it.

  2. bugzd

    newbite
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 11

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Mon Jul 7 2008 10:23:45
    #



    Login to Send PM

    uh oh. i think i asked too many questions...

  3. MixedFeelings

    member
    Joined: Jan '08
    Posts: 180

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Tue Jul 8 2008 18:18:43
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    Here are some answers.

    *Is drying alone (30 min+) sufficient for killing bugs and eggs in clothing? Is it necessary to wash on hot before drying or is washing an unnecessary step?

    Drying alone is sufficient to kill eggs and bugs, and 30+ mins should be fine if the item(s) are already dry. Put dryer on hottest setting and under-load it (as opposed to overstuffing it) to be sure everything gets good and hot. Clean lint catcher before each load (for extra fun, inspect it after each load to see if you "caught" anything).

    *Shoes-- along with the previous question-- should drying them for 30-60 min be sufficient? Some exterminators recommend treating shoes with pesticides (ie Steri-Fab).

    Drying alone as per above should be adequate. I would do 2-4 shoes per load. It will be really noisy.

    *Opinions on electronic items? Two exterminators I have spoken with say that I should not worry about my computers, cameras, and hard drives and that bugs would not be in there. Thoughts on this?

    I am not a professional, but I personally believe that in most light infestations, electronics are not usually affected. Just carefully inspect anything that was known to be near a confirmed bite / infestation location (eg: check the alarm clock beside the bed). I have seen bed bugs crawling all over a nightstand (at a sketchy hotel in NYC).

    *We are moving everything in plastic bins. Should we treat the outside of the bins before putting them into the moving truck, or does this seem unnecessary? If yes, any recommendations? Over the counter pesticide? Alcohol? Hot water?

    I personally would not feel compelled to treat the bins if you know they are new and clean and have not been exposed to BBs. Just carefully inspect what you pack into them.

    *My electronic items are currently sitting on metal shelves, in the hopes that if any bugs are in there they will crawl out and cross poison. Does it seem better to keep these items close to the bed or in the next room over? I would think that if close to the bed they might be more likely to crawl out, but that they would also be more likely to hide back in there. Thoughts on this?

    I would leave them where they are. I definitely would not move them closer to infested areas!! lol Personally, I would be more concerned about furniture (especially wooden items) as opposed to electronics.

    *When we move, we are planning on using our backyard as a staging area to further decontaminate items. In general, is using an outdoor area fairly safe if a distance away from the house? Or can bed bugs do fairly well outdoors?

    Being outdoors is not a guarantee that the BBs will not try to get inside (and/or hitch a ride on a human). I think I read somewhere that BBs can detect heat from 10-12 feet away. So try to work a good distance away from your new home. Also, BBs are unfortunately hardy beasts; being outdoors will not kill them.

    BTW, there are lots of previous threads here with advice about moving without taking BBs. It can be hard, and is not guaranteed to be successful. Some people have their new home treated premptively. IMO, if possible, it is best to ensure eradication at the current location before buying new furniture or moving.

    Good luck!!

    MF in Montreal

  4. Bugless

    member
    Joined: Dec '07
    Posts: 143

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Tue Jul 8 2008 18:57:02
    #



    Login to Send PM

    If it was me and I'd had bedbugs, I would throw out all my electronics in a bb-safe manner. That would include dumping the computer monitor and the TV set. It isn't worth the risk.

    Get rid of them in a way that others will not want to pick them up. However, do not use a hammer or axe on a monitor or a TV that has an old-style, bulky, glass, CRT picture tube. A very hard blow could make the CRT implode, with glass flying about.

    But if you really want to risk keeping all those things, at least throw out the keyboard and mouse. Bedbugs have been found in those. They can be replaced at small cost.

    Bedbugs have been found in computer plugs, so the dump cables too after cutting them in half.

    Also, get rid of the TV controller and hi-fi controller and buy a universal controller to replace them.

    Best wishes on a successful move.

  5. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,265

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Tue Jul 8 2008 19:22:58
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I have to strongly disagree with Bugless. Bugless, have you actually had bed bugs and found them in your electronics?

    I am with MixedFeelings:

    "I am not a professional, but I personally believe that in most light infestations, electronics are not usually affected. Just carefully inspect anything that was known to be near a confirmed bite / infestation location (eg: check the alarm clock beside the bed). I have seen bed bugs crawling all over a nightstand (at a sketchy hotel in NYC)."

    I would never throw out electronic items I did not know to be infested. And even then, decontamination may be possible.

    At the very least, items can be placed in an area during treatment, and surrounded by residual or mechanical pesticides. If it's done properly, they will eventually come out to feed, walk through this, and die.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  6. Gypsy

    junior member
    Joined: May '08
    Posts: 108

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Tue Jul 8 2008 19:40:17
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I agree with Nobugs and Mixedfeelings. I regret throwing out as much as I did before moving to my place, because it did not seem to matter. The little that I took with me, still managed to bring bed bugs with me. Although, this time around, the infestation has been light and easier to control than the previous apartment. Throwing out all your belongings is costly and not the solution. I too have heard from techs that bed bugs are not likely to live in electronics. They may walk through the electronics, but I have a hard time believing they can live in the electronics for very long. Bed bugs can just as easily come along with you in clothing, so no, the answer is not to throw away everything you own...I speak from experience. The answer is to pack very uncarefully, and call a professional exterminator the instant you suspect an infestation or find evidence of one in your new surrounding so that the problem can be eradicated.

  7. moonchill

    newbite
    Joined: Jun '08
    Posts: 21

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Tue Jul 8 2008 21:50:11
    #



    Login to Send PM

    maybe a possible solution when throwing items out could be spray-painting the word bed bug on there, so people would know, that is if you were going to throw stuff out.

  8. heartattackhelpme

    newbite
    Joined: Jun '08
    Posts: 41

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Jul 9 2008 2:10:01
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi
    does anyone think that hiring dogs would be good advice? I have had a light infestation for 6 months and have started working with dogs. They at least can take some of the guess work out of where the bbs are. It hasn't solved the problem yet...but I am working on it.
    These bbs really know how to survive.
    It is unbelievable

  9. bugzd

    newbite
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 11

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Thu Jul 10 2008 15:51:03
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thank you and thank you for all of these replies

    Yes, it is not an option for me to throw out all electronic items, and it was rather surprising to read that reply from Bugless. Besides not having limitless amounts of money... I need this equipment for my work and it's simply not an option to store or trash most of these things.... Anything not needed for work is being stored.

    MixedFeelings, I have been thinking having an exterminator at the new place within a few days after moving in, not so much as a precaution against a current infestation in the new place (which is extremely unlikely-- it's a converted space where no one has previously lived), but as a precaution against any bugs we might be taking with us.

    Now, for another paranoid question.... If there are mice in the storage space (which I think is likely), is this a major concern? As in, the possibility of bed bugs living off of the mice and remaining in the storage space after 18 months?

  10. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,265

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Thu Jul 10 2008 17:55:12
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Anything you store should be (IMHO) sealed in plastic and then placed inside plastic tubs with lids. The sealing in bags is so the bed bugs do not escape. (Remember a 1st instar nymph is the size of a period in a newspaper sentence, airtight is what's needed.)

    The tub is so mice don't gnaw through cardboard boxes and plastic.

    You don't need mice for your bed bugs to survive storage if you do not seal them in properly. They can live on a blood meal so a bed bug in your stuff biting a mouse or a guard, or some poor sap who goes into an adjoining unit, are all bad scenarios.

    But so is your unsealed stuff picking up bed bugs from the guy next door who brought them in last week.

  11. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,265

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Thu Jul 10 2008 17:55:17
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Anything you store should be (IMHO) sealed in plastic and then placed inside plastic tubs with lids. The sealing in bags is so the bed bugs do not escape. (Remember a 1st instar nymph is the size of a period in a newspaper sentence, airtight is what's needed.)

    The tub is so mice don't gnaw through cardboard boxes and plastic.

    You don't need mice for your bed bugs to survive storage if you do not seal them in properly. They can live on a blood meal so a bed bug in your stuff biting a mouse or a guard, or some poor sap who goes into an adjoining unit, are all bad scenarios.

    But so is your unsealed stuff picking up bed bugs (after being stored 17 months) from the guy next door who brought them in last week when storing his infested stuff. You need to think about that.

  12. fightorflight

    senior member
    Joined: Jan '08
    Posts: 704

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Fri Jul 11 2008 3:12:47
    #



    Login to Send PM

    > Now, for another paranoid question.... If there are mice in the storage space (which I think is likely), is this a major concern? As in, the possibility of bed bugs living off of the mice and remaining in the storage space after 18 months?

    I wondered this same thing. Especially as I did not put my things in plastic tubs, only multiple layers of bags (just not enough time), which the mice can chew through like butter. I dunno, we'll see after 18 months. That's going to be one nervous day.

  13. bugzd

    newbite
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 11

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Fri Jul 11 2008 12:19:30
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Not sure what to do about oversized items...

    Like a sofa chair, guitars, and many other items that won't fit into bins. Those things are currently in plastic, double bagged, but I don't feel this is enough. Also, to my horror, I realized that the furniture bags I bought contain tiny air holes. Great!

  14. lil_bit_obsessed

    senior member
    Joined: Dec '07
    Posts: 493

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Fri Jul 11 2008 13:52:43
    #



    Login to Send PM

    i think you can purchase large plastic wrap, industrial size, the type of stuff that moving companies may have. maybe this would be a better option than plastic bags for your large furniture?

    it's not much protection against mice, i don't imagine, but at least it would be sealable - as opposed to the bags with holes in them...


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

297,187 posts in 50,134 topics over 155 months by 21,917 of 22,411 members. Latest: ij430jf, patbb, Peachyy92