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DDVP pest strip question

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  1. MyWorstFear

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 12:37:57
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    I have to buy a floor lamp but I worry that maybe somebody with bed bugs maybe had it in their home and then maybe returned it. I know, that's a lot of maybe's. It's in a box, but the boxes they had in the store were all taped up, and it was impossible to tell if they had been opened and resealed.
    Anyway, if I do go ahead and buy it, if I take it out of the box and wrap the lamp in plastic with a DDVP strip, how long should I leave the lamp in there? Is 2 weeks enough or should I go longer since it's getting cooler here and I'd leave the whole thing in the garage during "treatment".
    Or, any other suggestions?
    I really fear bringing anything into the house that doesn't go thru the Packtite or dryer these days.

  2. thebedbugguy

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 13:05:42
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    A vapona (DDVP) strip enclosed in a plastic bag should kill everything within a couple of days. Depending on the size of the strips, they can treat as much as 1200 cubic feet. There are also smaller strips available that treat smaller areas that are a couple of hundred maybe a few hundred cubic feet)

  3. MyWorstFear

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 13:14:34
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    But the strips don't kill the eggs, or do they? If they don't kill the eggs, would 2 weeks be enough or would I need to wait 4 weeks or more?

  4. spideyjg

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 13:15:12
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    Has there been any info on the mortality of eggs using DDVP? Since I have never heard my rule on DDVP bagged treatment is a month. 1 week for bugs, 1 week pause for any eggs to hatch, 1 week for nymphs to die, and 1 week for good measure.

    Jim

  5. thebedbugguy

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 13:22:31
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    Spideyjg is right 1 week should do it. The product I use recommends 1 week (even though a few days does the trick always follow label instructions)

  6. MyWorstFear

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 13:27:03
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    Thanks Jim...so a whole month before I can have light,
    Better blind than buggy!

  7. spideyjg

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 13:37:25
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    thebedbugguy - 14 minutes ago  » 
    Spideyjg is right 1 week should do it. The product I use recommends 1 week (even though a few days does the trick always follow label instructions)

    Any info on egg mortality?

  8. thebedbugguy

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 14:35:48
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    Nothing official but I treated a small figurine with adults, nymphs and eggs all over it. I placed it in a bag with a Nuvan ProStrip for 5 days then removed the strip. I kept the figurine on a piece of paper on top of a rat mat (extra large glueboard) and 3.5-4 weeks later no new nymphs and the eggs were there. I scrapped off the eggs and placed them in a bag which sat at my desk for a month or so (every once in a while I would open the bag to allow oxygen in) and they never hatched.

    I guess that is just as good as any other experiment manufacturers perform.

  9. Tracy

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 16:41:02
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    The issue of DDVP's effects on the eggs was something that I unclear about as well, so I opted for a longer period of time. The experiment that the thebedbugguy did was an interesting one, however I would caution most people to not underestimate these creatures. While it is true that the eggs are living and therefore need to breathe, don't forget that DDVP works as a neurotoxin and I think it is really unclear as to how this chemical effects the embryos.

    Also, please understand that with regards to electronics and other similar devices that are essentially closed boxes with some openings, that airflow is absolutely critical to the effectiveness of the fumigant. That point is why I am not a fan of sealing stuff in bags - I would almost always prefer to put items in an overly large bin sealed with the DDVP strips and perhaps a small battery operated fan to force airflow in and around the items being treated.

    The concern I have with treating items in too little time or sealing in bags with no airflow is that the strip needs air to sublimate (ie release the gas) and the gas needs to penetrate into the items being treated.

    I agree with Spideyjg and err of the side of more time rather than less time . The 1 week may have worked for thebedbugguy because the item was a figurine that did not have sealed areas like a TV.

    Electronics can certainly be treated with DDVP with no concern for corrosion. To do so, I would buy a very large bin and a small battery operated fan and seal the bin with strong tape.

  10. nycyn

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 16:56:01
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    This is what Nader has to say:

    http://www.nader.org/index.php?/archives/1293-Dont-Buy-No-Pest-Strip.html

    Just doing the devil's advocate thing while considering getting the product myself.

  11. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 17:19:56
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    Nader's information on DDVP dates from 1976, when these strips were still hung in occupied structures. (I distinctly remember seeing them in buildings at the camp I went to growing up. Some of those structures were in compliance with today's labels--like a tack shed. Others, like the arts and crafts hut, were not.)

    The labeling today prohibits the use of this chemical in structures that are occupied by people for more than 3 hours (I think it's three; It's a number, so I could be wrong.) a day.

    I'm probably on the more cautious side when it comes to how I would personally use them. The old labeling, I believe, allowed them to be used the way Nader's article discusses. Today, putting a baby in a room with one would be against label instructions.

    DDVP is an organophosphate pesticide, and anyone who is using them in any way inside a structure--including "sealing" them inside airtight containers to treat items--should be intimately familiar with the signs of organophosphate poisoning.

    I strongly encourage people who are going to use DDVP strips to store the containers--be they bags or bins--in areas that are not occupied by people or animals. I also prefer bins because animals can't eat through them, the way rodents can with bags. Holes in the containers might weaken the effectiveness of the chemical and it can place other people at risk if the containers are being stored somewhere next to occupied structures.

  12. MyWorstFear

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 18:01:48
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    Wow, had no idea my question would have all these responses and possible dangers. I don't see how I can put a 52" floor lamp in a bin as I haven't seen any that big, and placing it in plastic without circulation might not be effective. So, any other ideas to make sure it's bed bug free? I haven't purchased the lamp yet and am waiting to see what you all suggest under the circumstances.

  13. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 20:02:02
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    Myworstfear,

    Some thoughts:

    A cheap floor lamp probably comes in sections that get attached. I am thinking the ones from Ikea. You could probably put the pieces in a Packtite, or place the pieces in a bin with DDVP.

    A solid, more expensive, more well-made floor lap might actually be safer because it may not come apart into many pieces. (The pieces, like the hollow shells of an Ikea floor lamp's main pole, are where I would be concerned about bed bugs getting inside and hiding.)

    The more solid the thing is, and the more you feel you can actually inspect the whole thing, the less I would worry.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  14. thebedbugguy

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 20:28:51
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    Nobugsonme has good points. If it can come apart place it in a PackTite. Just take a really good look at it before you bring it in the house. If you really want this lamp you may also be able to get the lamp fumigated. You may WILL a lot of money (relatively speaking) to have such a small item fumigated (fumigation is similar to using a DDVP strip but on a larger scale with a gas product such as Vikane) but some companies do have fumigation chambers for small items.

  15. MyWorstFear

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 20:37:31
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    This is the picture of the type lamp I wanted to get. I'm not sure it comes apart. The going rate around here for Vikane is $500+ so that's way too high for just a lamp that costs $100., and the lamp might not even have bed bugs....I just want to be sure.
    http://www.joann.com/joann/catalog/productdetail.jsp?pageName=search&flag=true&PRODID=prd27998

  16. thebedbugguy

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 21:10:22
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    Are you getting in it white? If so just do a thorough inspection since you should be able to see anything funny.

  17. Tracy

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Oct 9 2010 23:04:27
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    buggyinsocal - 5 hours ago  » 
    DDVP is an organophosphate pesticide, and anyone who is using them in any way inside a structure--including "sealing" them inside airtight containers to treat items--should be intimately familiar with the signs of organophosphate poisoning.

    In making the statements I posted above, I was in no way encouraging people to do this in occupied portions of their home.

    Having extensively utilized this chemical, in my own home I feel that it would be ok to place a sealed bin in a garage, storage locker, or even a sealed closet in a part of the home not frequented that can have opened windows, if possible.

    I simply did not make that point obvious but I will do so directly in any other postings I answer.

    I actually did experiments in my apartment with a DDVP strip "sealed" in a bag (not a ziplock) and I found that it was nearly impossible to effectively keep the chemical from escaping. I could still smell it. I suspect that may be the case with a bin that is sealed with tape. It may not be 100% airtight all over the bin and therefore the chemical may escape. Best to isolate ANYTHING being treated with DDVP into a room that can be sealed off with windows that can be opened or even better in a garage or storage locker.

  18. MyWorstFear

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Oct 10 2010 0:13:05
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    Bedbugguy, I think the lamp only comes in some light weird grey. You're right, I should be able to see anything on the outside. I'm just nervous about the inside and what I can't see. I suppose I could always unwrap it in the garage and if I see cracks and crevices, maybe pack it back up and take it back. Or, I may just pass on the whole lamp altogether. I'll let you know what I decide to do. Thanks for everyone's suggestions/ideas.

  19. bushbugg

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Oct 10 2010 0:39:10
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    Tracy -
    Electronics can certainly be treated with DDVP with no concern for corrosion. To do so, I would buy a very large bin and a small battery operated fan and seal the bin with strong tape.

    Product Idea!
    Hold on, I gotta make a quick trip to the patent office.

  20. bugnut

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Oct 11 2010 8:35:06
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    Today I will open my closet after 2 months with 2 16 gram (?) strips. I do not know if I actually had them in the closet, but I had some leather items I did not know how to treat.

    The closet is right next to the window so I will open all windows and direct a fan at the closet, which other than the coats and a few trophies is empty.

    I hope I will feel secure enough to actually USE the closet now. It has been almost 3 months all clear but still do not have a secure feeling. Don't know that I ever will.

  21. Bite me

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Oct 11 2010 16:47:21
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    I left a DDVP strip in my bedroom for 3 weeks while I was away, after 2 treatments. When I got back I opened all the windows and let it air out for 3 days before going back and always wore a mask. I didn't sleep there for another 2 weeks, just because of circumstances, but also to be safe. PCO's have told me they're not allowed to use this for bedbugs, but that off the record, it kills everything....


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