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community warning in my area

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  1. fed up

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Tue Feb 14 2017 20:23:25
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    Recently on the news and in the newspaper in my local area that the health department and sanitation department issued a warning that because of the bb epidemic all mattress and couches put on the street for trash pick up must be securely wrapped in strong plastic. If it is not wrapped the sanitation department will not pick it up. Also any unwrapped furniture left on the curb the owner of the property will be cited for a hefty fine.

  2. mp7ski

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 0:23:06
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    fed up - 3 hours ago  » 
    Recently on the news and in the newspaper in my local area that the health department and sanitation department issued a warning that because of the bb epidemic all mattress and couches put on the street for trash pick up must be securely wrapped in strong plastic. If it is not wrapped the sanitation department will not pick it up. Also any unwrapped furniture left on the curb the owner of the property will be cited for a hefty fine.

    And so it begins... I imagine before long this will be a common thing in many cities throughout the country. Then it will hit a certain point where most people have them and precautions like these will do little good.

    What an epidemic this is becoming. We sent a man to the frickin moon for god sakes yet we can't figure out a way to effectively get rid of a pest that turns lives upside down. Ridiculous...

    I know some people on here say most people get rid of them. I wish I could believe that. Why have they grown 400% in the last 5 years in my state, 800% in Alaska alone. Reality is most people don't get rid of them, learn to deal with them, then spread them to other people. Sure they can be eradiacted in certain situations. Catch them early and hire the right company that does it right, sure... but most people aren't that lucky.

    I am not an expert, any advice I give should be considered as amateur advice and not taken as fact. I mean well with all my posts and try to give back. If you plan on using any of my advice, I suggest doing research into said advice to make sure it is in your best interest.
    Study on Thermal Death Points(pages 18-29 of pdf) : http://www.propanecouncil.org/uploadedFiles/Council/Research_and_Development/REP_12221%20Efficacy%20of%20Heat%20on%20Bed%20Bugs.pdf
    Study on Cimexa: http://www.pctonline.com/article/pct0814-silica-gel-research-bed-bugs/
  3. Poiqm

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 0:49:08
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    . Catch them early and hire the right company that does it right, sure... but most people aren't that lucky.

    I would guess that the reason they are multiplying so rapidly is because most people don't take it very seriously since most people aren't affected by their bites. My tenant is that way, he doesn't get an allergic response or scratch and itch so he doesn't consider bed bugs a big deal. To him they are no different than having other household bugs. He's fine with spraying now and then to keep the population down.

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  4. mp7ski

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 1:59:12
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    Poiqm - 59 minutes ago  » 

    . Catch them early and hire the right company that does it right, sure... but most people aren't that lucky.

    I would guess that the reason they are multiplying so rapidly is because most people don't take it very seriously since most people aren't affected by their bites. My tenant is that way, he doesn't get an allergic response or scratch and itch so he doesn't consider bed bugs a big deal. To him they are no different than having other household bugs. He's fine with spraying now and then to keep the population down.

    There's no doubt situations like you describe also contribute to the spreading. But let's be real here. There's people on here that give a crap, have spent tens of thousands of dollars, yet still have them. Theres one family that had a failed thermal, two failed fumigations, and the only way they could get away from them was to buy a trailer, park it on their lawn, and walk out of the infested house with very little. They left that infested house sit for 2.5 years and when they were prepping to move back in, found a live adult bed bug in the house.

    So you're telling me that after everything that family did to try and get rid of them, that most people get rid of them?

    I can't believe that. If most people got rid of them, they wouldn't be spreading like wildfire... period.

  5. bugged-cdn

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 6:02:06
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    most people aren't affected by their bites.

    The number on that is around 30%, so I wouldn't say that most people don't react to bites.

  6. Livingagain

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 10:12:10
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    Where's the link for that mp7ski?

    Have you contacted your govt. representatives? There are many things they can do like approving propoxur for homes that don't have children; retesting DDT to see if the bugs still are resistant to it decades later. If we don't put pressure on our govt. nothing will change.

  7. Poiqm

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 12:44:34
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    The number on that is around 30%, so I wouldn't say that most people don't react to bites.

    I was going by this...

    "The percentage of people who do not react to bed bug bites is commonly stated as 70%, but a lengthy discussion as to why this is wrong rages on. The new evidence implies that "repeated exposure" to bed bug bites is the key to whether or not you react to the anesthetic in the bed bug's saliva. In other words, if you have bed bug bites, treatment requires more than just stopping the itching. You have to get rid of the infestation as well."

    https://www.terminix.com/blog/diy/signs-your-room-has-bed-bugs

    But if there is a war raging on about the percentage then not for me to try and figure it out. lol

  8. Poiqm

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 12:50:46
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    I can see how living in an apartment could make getting rid of bed bugs difficult IF the surrounding apartments have them. But for a single resident home, they should be able to get rid of them. They are crawling bugs with fairly predictable behavior and one food source (blood). Reinfestation from outside sources could be a concern with children but precautions can be taken. If eradication is failing in a single family home then it's human error in the treatment plan.

  9. Poiqm

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 12:51:53
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    I would like to see some statistics on the percentage of successful vs failed treatments. I'm curious now and will hunt for it.

  10. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 13:17:24
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    barelyliving - 2 hours ago  » 
    Have you contacted your govt. representatives? There are many things they can do like approving propoxur for homes that don't have children; retesting DDT to see if the bugs still are resistant to it decades later. If we don't put pressure on our govt. nothing will change.

    Hi,

    The reason why propoxur has an exception for use around the elderly is not because of the health risk children. It is actually because of the known health risks that arise from preconception maternal exposure. To be clear the risk is the the children conceived by those exposed to this sort of product.

    The arguments about the environmental impact of DDT speak very loudly for themselves.

    However, to address the fallacy of the "magic bullet" you need to understand the basis of resistance development. It is very similar to anti-biotics in that resistance develops as a result of exposure to the product being used, the population that mutate and adapt survive creating resistant populations. I saw some data that indicated that resistance to Neonicitinoids was observed in bed bugs within 12 months of their release. Yes a completely new class of insecticide failed in the field in under a year.

    This alone is clear indication of why a chemical based approach is doomed to failure and will ultimately make the matter worse.

    Yes you need to apply pressure to governments to see things get better but part of that is fighting for the right things.

    David

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  11. mp7ski

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 14:38:30
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    barelyliving - 4 hours ago  » 
    Where's the link for that mp7ski?
    Have you contacted your govt. representatives? There are many things they can do like approving propoxur for homes that don't have children; retesting DDT to see if the bugs still are resistant to it decades later. If we don't put pressure on our govt. nothing will change.

    People need to lay off the propxur and ddt talk, it's not going to happen. Ohio already tried getting the epa to allow the use of propoxur cause of how bad it's getting there and they shot it down in no time.

    Like David said, chemicals may knock a population down for a bit but the bugs just become more resistant to the chemicals and make the problem worse and harder to treat in the long run.

    Non chemical treatments are going to be the only way to get this epidemic under control. The problem is that most the companies that offer them dont take it serious enough or put in the time and effort to properly treat a residence. Unless the government creates laws and guidelines for these companies and somehow make heat treatments and fumigation more affordable, then this problem won't have any chance of getting better anytime soon.

  12. bugged-cdn

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 16:48:28
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    The reason why propoxur has an exception for use around the elderly is not because of the health risk children. It is actually because of the known health risks that arise from preconception maternal exposure. To be clear the risk is the the children conceived by those exposed to this sort of product.

    I don't know about other countries but this is the current situation in Canada :

    For postapplication exposure following indoor application of propoxur, non-cancer risks of concern were identified for children. Cancer risks were identified for most uses. Therefore, risk mitigation is required for indoor application.

    For indoor postapplication exposure, the calculated dermal and inhalation margins of exposure (MOEs) for adults and youths are greater than the target MOE and are not of concern. The calculated inhalation and incidental oral treated surface-to-hand-to-mouth MOEs do not meet the target MOE for children and are of concern.

    To mitigate risk from indoor applications of propoxur, propoxur must not be applied to indoor residential use sites, including homes, hospitals, schools, public buildings, day-care facilities, motels, hotels, passenger areas of trains, buses or airplanes, or other indoor locations where children may be exposed.
    Source

  13. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 17:36:34
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    Hi,

    Try to get your hand on this medical paper:

    Cancer Causes Control
    Exposure to pesticides and the risk of childhood brain tumors
    Kathryn R. Greenop • Susan Peters • Helen D. Bailey • Lin Fritschi • John Attia • Rodney J. Scott • Deborah C. Glass • Nicholas H. de Klerk • Frank Alvaro • Bruce K. Armstrong • Elizabeth Milne
    Received: 16 January 2013/Accepted: 27 March 2013

    Shortly after the paper came out I tracked down a UK cancer specialist and we overlay-ed our epidemiology data and areas of high bed bug cases per capita also have corresponding peaks in the CBT data a few years later. I lost sleep for a few days over that but diverted that energy into becoming 100% green as fast as possible.

    I also feel that the ban on use around children is a very clear reason why it is not likely to promote the health of adults either.

    David

  14. Livingagain

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 18:36:16
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    mp7ski-- Non-chemical means are going to knock down your infestation? Buy yourself a steamer.

  15. mp7ski

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 19:23:03
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    barelyliving - 42 minutes ago  » 
    mp7ski-- Non-chemical means are going to knock down your infestation? Buy yourself a steamer.

    I own one, for now... but what do you expect me to steam, my beds which are encased and isolated? My couches which I no longer have? The cracks and crevices where chemicals have been applied along with cimexa. Steam wasn't the main non chemical treatment I was referring to although it should be included in the conversation.. Heat and fumigation are the main ones I was referring to.

  16. FayeState

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 19:25:41
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    Actually fumigation is chemical treatment.

  17. mp7ski

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 19:56:43
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    FayeState - 21 minutes ago  » 
    Actually fumigation is chemical treatment.

    Texhnically, yes. But it's not used in the same way as traditional chemical treatments. It's a fumigant. The problem with traditional chemical treatments is that bugs develop resistance as they try to poison the bug in one way or another. With a fumigant like vikane, it's replaces the oxygen in the air which bugs and eggs need to survive, therefore they can't develop a resistance.

  18. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 20:03:40
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    Sorry that's not how Vikane or any fumigant works. They work because they are a gaseous delivery which enters the insect and kills it via metabolic mechanisms.

    What you have described is Oxygen depletion which is not an effective way of dealing with bed bugs and is certainly not conducive to prolonged human life.

    The aim of fumigation is to ensure there is enough of a concentration of the fumigant contained in the space to ensure complete dispersal and thus complete death of all bed bugs. Like heat when done correctly it is a single treatment process but offers no residual protection against any bed bugs that are brought into the home later.

    David

  19. mp7ski

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 20:14:08
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    bed-bugscouk - 6 minutes ago  » 
    Sorry that's not how Vikane or any fumigant works. They work because they are a gaseous delivery which enters the insect and kills it via metabolic mechanisms.
    What you have described is Oxygen depletion which is not an effective way of dealing with bed bugs and is certainly not conducive to prolonged human life.
    The aim of fumigation is to ensure there is enough of a concentration of the fumigant contained in the space to ensure complete dispersal and thus complete death of all bed bugs. Like heat when done correctly it is a single treatment process but offers no residual protection against any bed bugs that are brought into the home later.
    David

    Well it turns out my understanding of how it works was wrong, thank you for correcting me.

    But back to my original comment, bed bugs have yet been proven to become resistant to Vikane.

  20. Livingagain

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 21:18:53
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    I bet you'll beat them without moving. How long since you've seen one?

  21. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 15 2017 21:30:07
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    mp7ski - 23 minutes ago  » 
    But back to my original comment, bed bugs have yet been proven to become resistant to Vikane.

    Not when done correctly.

    Have treatment failures occurred? Yes, they have.

    The skills of fumigation tend to be more prevalent in regions where termites are an issue. Therefore you can expect the correct skills may be deficient in those regions.

    However, my biggest concern with the long term viability of fumigation is environmental. At the end of the process the remaining fumigant is released to the atmosphere and gassed off. If there were a way to neutralize or recapture the fumigant I might feel a little happier about it but until that happens I think the majority opinion is "please don't poison the air we share".

    David

  22. anonabug

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Feb 17 2017 10:26:31
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    We've had success with Cimexa. But I do wonder how quickly the bedbugs might become resistant to that, by evolving a different type of protective waxy cuticle that can't be destroyed by the dessicant.

  23. loubugs

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Feb 17 2017 11:40:20
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    mp7ski - 1 day ago  » 

    FayeState - 21 minutes ago  » 
    Actually fumigation is chemical treatment.

    Texhnically, yes. But it's not used in the same way as traditional chemical treatments. It's a fumigant. The problem with traditional chemical treatments is that bugs develop resistance as they try to poison the bug in one way or another. With a fumigant like vikane, it's replaces the oxygen in the air which bugs and eggs need to survive, therefore they can't develop a resistance.

    Actually Vikane (sulfuryl fluoride) was used when there was resistance to a fumigant called phosphine gas, so resistance to a fumigant can occur. It had been used in grain fumigation of Rhyzopertha dominica and Tribolium castaneum beetles and there were fumigant failures. The egg stage is the most resistant life stage. Respiration is required and there isn't much in the egg stage compared to post hatched stages. Oxygen depletion or replacement with another gas (i.e., argon, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and not all work on all kinds of target insects. Well, argon, is pretty good) are other types of treatment regimes.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  24. loubugs

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Feb 17 2017 11:46:51
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    anonabug - 1 hour ago  » 
    We've had success with Cimexa. But I do wonder how quickly the bedbugs might become resistant to that, by evolving a different type of protective waxy cuticle that can't be destroyed by the dessicant.

    The dessicant dust doesn't necessarily destroy the waxy outer cuticle. It can absorb the oils and fats and this allows moisture to be released from the now non-protected cuticle. The moisture can wicked out into the silicon structure such as occurs in Diatomaceous earth. There is also a surface scarring that can occur on the insect cuticle with DE, but the action of CimeXa dust is reported to be pure dessicant - it is amorphous and does not have any crystalline component as does DE.


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