Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Tools/ideas for fighting bed bugs

cleaning vacuum?

(6 posts)
  1. BuggyDad

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun Aug 21 2011 0:39:00
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    My daughter recently discovered her apartment is infested. I drove across the state to help her deal with the problem, (and even more importantly provide some MUCH needed moral support). I took our home vacs with me to use there, (both Oreck bag models... one upright, one small portable). I ended up using the upright in a remote, unused room at the far end of the apt., where presence of bb's is unlikely, but not impossible. I sealed the bag in plastic and discarded it, but the empty vac did sit in the kitchen for a couple of days. At some point psychotic paranoia struck over the possibility of bringing bugs back home with me. I have the vac double sealed in contractor bags, but my wife wants to use it. What are the chances of a hitchhiker in the vac, and what ways do people clean out or treat their vacs beyond just safely disposing of the bag?

  2. CityofTerror

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun Aug 21 2011 0:54:40
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    We have a bag less model, so I'm not sure if this helps at all. But it's work a try. My partner uses a combo of boiling water, mixed with rubbing alcohol mix when they're done vacuuming to prevent the nasty little things getting into our livingroom when the rest of the house is cleaned. So far this has worked, (we currently only have the problem centered to our bedroom. They've killed a couple on contact this way. Just make sure the spray bottle you use is contractor grade as something you pick up at the local convince store just isn't going to cut it and will probably just melt. (They're not overly expensive a good one is about ten bucks.) This also wont damage your vacuum so long as you let it dry first. But as I said we have a bag less.

  3. EndOfMyRope

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Sep 17 2011 6:05:25
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    BuggyDad, great question! And CityOfTerror..excellent idea! I too have a bagless type vacuum and have wondered how to make sure its clear of bbs after I vacuum.. I will take your advice from here on out ..my only other question is ..any thoughts on making sure the hose (where you attach the crevice tool) I cannot afford another vacuum, so I dont want to ruin it, but I worry they hang out in the hose.

    Thanks again for the great advice!

  4. jrbtnyc

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Sep 17 2011 11:08:19
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    When catching bb's, place into the front of the vacuum cleaner tube a knee-high nylon stocking which you then tie off and discard. Of course you have to remember to tie off and discard it immediately after use so the bugs don't have any time slot during which they can find their way back out. Knee-highs are inexpensive, some as cheap as around 50 cents each. Or you could save them in a ziploc-type bag and eventually PackTite them so as to be able to re-use them.

    See...

    http://bedbugger.com/forum/tags/knee-highs

    ...and...

    http://www.google.com/search?q=%22knee-high%22+site%3Abedbugger.com&hl=en&num=100&lr=&ft=i&cr=&safe=images&tbs= .

    As I opined on one of the threads, the knee-high technique is great and should be universal standard operating procedure for everyone using a vacuum cleaner to suction up bed bugs.

  5. Rosae

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Sep 17 2011 13:07:57
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    I assumed that insecticides on the floor were enough to kill them also in de vacuum.

  6. jrbtnyc

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Sep 17 2011 13:16:05
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    Rosae - 6 minutes ago  » 
    I assumed that insecticides on the floor were enough to kill them also in [the] vacuum.

    Not having any treatment expertise, but it's my understanding insecticides often don't kill bed bugs very fast, if they kill them at all since many populations are now resistant in varying degrees to many of the chemicals.

    See Wall Street Journal article which appeared January 20 on bed bugs' evolution of greater and greater pesticide resistance...

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703951704576092302399464190.html .

    (Note the Wall Street Journal and its parent News Corp., Rupert Murdoch's company, are not exactly renowned as left-wing tree-huggers.)

    So a bug might survive long enough to be able to crawl out and bite you that night at least. After he bites you, of course the blood meal strengthens him a lot and maybe also the blood meal "dilutes the effect of the chemical" in his "bloodstream" (my speculation) since after feeding he weighs, what, two to six times more than he did before so the pesticide has to "spread itself a lot thinner" in his system (again, my speculation). So maybe that makes him all the more likely to be able to survive effects of the pesticide, "get the hang of" beating the pesticide, then pass that ability along to the next generations who of course keep building on that over time.


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