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cleaning protocols AFTER treatment

(15 posts)
  1. BuggedOut

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Tue Dec 4 2007 12:17:18
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    hi everyone,

    what are the general timelines for doing things like vacuuming/mopping of non-laundry items AFTER treatment? i know that there are different recommendations depending on what was used.

    i was sprayed with a combo suspend and gentrol and was wondering how soon i can start steaming and washing with murphy's, etc. afterwards, as i don't want to compromise any residuals... thank you!

  2. angie

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Tue Dec 4 2007 12:29:59
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    I was told 24 to 48 hours before cleaning. Of course the treatments didn't work that great in my case. I did have to consider the fact that my kids were going to be cohabitating with the chemical cocktail that was sprayed so I began vacumming the next day. Then mopping and scrubbing the day after that. The PCO wanted to give the stuff enough time to dry completely.

  3. itchyincharmcity

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    Posted 12 years ago
    Tue Dec 4 2007 12:37:23
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    You ned to ask your PCO. Depending on what he used, he may tell you not to vacuum for a fe weeks or he may say it's OK to cavuum right away. He may say no mopping.

    I also was sprayed with Suspend and Gentrol, plus NIC which I suspect is not a great product. The guy has not called me as I asked and gave no direction of follow up, other than I should give his stuff 2-3 weeks to work and not go around spraying or dusting my own treatments everywhere.

    I have gone ahead and done some vacuuming, but not a ton. Also, I went to Home Depot and bought some of the spongy insulator things to put behind the switchplates. I think Doug Summers recommended these. I have not done all my switches and outlets yet, just the ones the PCO dusted. I am going to open the rest of them and dust with DE, then seal them. It is a proactive measure and it feels like taking control.

  4. lil_bit_obsessed

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Mon Dec 10 2007 14:36:26
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    itchy,
    spongy insulator things? as a way of sealing off the electrical outlets? i hadn't heard of this before...

  5. lieutenantdan

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Mon Dec 10 2007 15:04:37
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    I did very little cleaning for six weeks after last spray. I think that you can vacuum but I think I waited for a week.
    Be careful of things like sunlight and windex etc... this will break down the chemicals. NO STEAMING for six weeks or so.The sponge things are good but first inspect with a flashlight your outlets. In the room that was ground zero (bedroom) I caulked the plates after I dusted and a couple of months after the last spray I caulked the house and painted the bedroom and some other rooms.
    Also I dusted cracks in the wood floor best I could. H.Depot has clear caulk which I prefer.

  6. itchyincharmcity

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Mon Dec 10 2007 17:12:06
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    lil -

    Let's see if I can explain this. I used little foam rectangles that I bought at Home Depot. You unscrew the plate and pop this thing around the swith or outlet, then replace the plate. See this diagram to see if you understand. http://www.usahardware.com/inet/shop/item/41360/icn/20-516237/wj_dennis/1062.htm

    It's about 99 cents for a pack of two. They are perforated so you just punch out the litte square that fits over the switch. Some fit perfectly but some I had to trim down. THe more I think about it I think it was Doug whom mentioned them.

    I have a couple of outlets that are on a wall I share with my neighbor, I may caulk them as well just to be safe.

    Also see this:
    http://dinogy.com/entry/31/energy-savings-tip-insulate-your-outlets

  7. lil_bit_obsessed

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Tue Dec 11 2007 0:20:01
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    *adds strange foam thingies to shopping list*

    thanks itchy!

    i think i might caulk too ltdan... you waited until after several treatments were done to do the caulking? was there any reason for that, as in, could doing it now potentially sabotage treatment? (i've only had one treatment so far...)

    oh and p.s. this is a general question for anyone who might happen to know: is sterifab something you only purchase online, or is it often available in hardware stores? and is it only a contact killer, or does it work in any other way as well?

    thanks everyone

  8. lieutenantdan

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Tue Dec 11 2007 10:17:41
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    lil_bit_obsessed,
    No, not several treatments but three. First two with Suspend SC/Gentrol mix and last with a product that is not labled for bbs called BP-300 by Whitemire. I think that this BP-300 should be looked into. BP-300 I believe is petroleum based and may have been the straw that broke the camel's back. I do not think that when you caulk matters much because if they are in the walls and you seal up whatever you can they still will look for some little space too exit, possibly. If I remember correctly it was just a time thing with me as to when I did caulk. I did not steam or use any product that may have the potential to break down the chemicals though.
    I do think that caulk is a good idea in general because it can cover holes that would allow roaches and other insects entry as well as bbs and it is a good pro-active measure as therapy and is cheap. Use the clear caulk so your environment does not show a ton of white caulk all around. I do not think that caulking can get in the way of treatment unless you cover an area that will not be sprayed and bbs are living in that spot. You can spray some BEDLAM in those areas first and let dry then caulk for an added tactic.

    I bought steri-fab at local hardware store but it is also sold online. A contact kill only and I think it is good for killing bacteria and virus also. Can damage some fabric, test first. I also recommend Murhy Orange soap in spray bottle. Whip on floor and baseboards, trim etc... I like the smell as well.

    Good luck and don't panic too much. Battle on and use common sense and have some fun with it as well. We will all get these little bastards.

  9. itchyincharmcity

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Tue Dec 11 2007 16:45:59
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    I saw Ster Fab for sale in a janitorial supply store here in Baltimore, called Odorite. They also have an online catalog.

    I have been told by a home renovator to be sure to buy painter's caulk. It is much easier to work with than silicone caulk. And it can be painted to match your wall.

  10. lil_bit_obsessed

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Tue Dec 11 2007 21:40:19
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    thanks folks. so steri-fab is made mostly of rubbing alcohol isn't it?

    i have a suspicion that my 6 month old kitchen table (where i'm working at with my laptop these days now that my couch is gone) may have some new little hatchlings roaming around in the crevices. the last few bites i received are on my hands and forearms, nothing at all like the earlier bites i got in bed (upper arms and face) or on the couch (hips and legs). so for lack of any steri-fab i sprayed the table (into crevices and whatnot) with rubbing alcohol today. i heard that it is a contact kill as well. i wonder if the smell of it deters them at all? it sure as h*ll deters me...

  11. lieutenantdan

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Dec 12 2007 10:30:23
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    lil_bit_obsessed,
    Your table may have bbs or it may not until you actually see them or signs it is a mystery. The bite indication thing for me is not a positive indicator because of the way our immune system respond to bed bug bites. I did not have any skin reactions to anything until three months after my wife reacted to bb bites and made the discovery and I do not know if my reactions were stress induced or chemical induced or old bites that finally appeared or new bites or all of the above. So inspect with a flashlight and 10x loupe and clean and do not pay as much attention to the bite thing unless you are so severly attacked and if you are severly attacked then my guess is close inspections will render signs of bed bugs. Also let us not forget about the possibility that the work place may have bed bugs.

  12. lil_bit_obsessed

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Dec 12 2007 10:40:11
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    ltdan, yeah that immune system thing buggers my mind (no pun intended). i'm never sure if what i have is a new bite or an old one. i *think* they're new ones. yesterday i woke up with a bunch of new small bites (the most yet), and it was day five after the first treatment. i've heard that's typical. then today i woke up with, i think, two new ones. since my bed is isolated, the mattress/boxspring encased, and the bedclothes are being washed daily, the only thing i can figure is that they are in the metal bedframe. i'm tempted to take it apart and spray that sucker down with rubbing alcohol - but i think the PCO might have sprayed it with the dragnet residual when he was here and so i'm trying to be patient... is it typical to still be getting bit like this in an isolated bed after treatment?

    p.s. regarding the workplace, good point. i'm fortunate enough to be able to work from home when i need to, so i've been avoiding going in lately so that i don't spread anything to there. hope it works!

  13. lieutenantdan

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Dec 12 2007 10:47:19
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    lil_bit_obsessed,
    I say do take your bed apart, I did eventually when I had time to get around to it and I found signs where one post meets the other, my frame is wood but I have seen images that bbs can get into metal. I think an inspection would make you feel better.
    In my opinion it is hard to isolate a bed. I tried and it has been compromised.
    Also do not use anything that will break down the chemicals for one month to two months after each treatment except you can vacuum.
    Do you think that you can be getting bites at work?

  14. lil_bit_obsessed

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Dec 12 2007 23:22:43
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    ltdan, no i'm quite sure i'm not being bit at work, since i'm being bit pretty consistently, but i'm not actually GOING to work. i've been working from home the last two weeks to avoid spreading anything to there. it's a bit mind boggling though, to never leave this apartment considering the state it's in. i share an office with several other graduate students, none of whom are in any better of a financial situation than i am, and so i wouldn't want to see any of them have to deal with this.

    i think i will try to wrangle the contact information for the PCO out of my property manager. if i knew one way or another whether or not he sprayed the bedframe, that could sway whether or not i decide to take it apart and rubbing-alcohol-spray the h*ll out of it. if there are residuals on it, of course, i'll leave it alone. but it's been driving me crazy thinking about it.

  15. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Fri Dec 14 2007 9:42:11
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    lil_bit,
    sorry this is a delayed response. steri-fab contains alcohol but also a pyrethroid. the differences between contact killers are laid out on the useful stuff page:
    http://bedbugger.com/usefulstuff/

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."

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