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CBC documentary on bed bugs

(17 posts)
  1. BuggyB00

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon May 19 2014 18:34:49
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    http://www.cbc.ca/player/Shows/Shows/Doc+Zone/ID/2418136659

    "Victims almost entirely drained of blood". Ugh.

    Not trying to fan anxiety, but believe me, people don't *want* to take this seriously. They have no idea, until they get it. So the more awareness, the better. Many people question the authenticity of info on the growing problem, and the seriousness of the problem. A CBC documentary has good street cred.

  2. JustChecking

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon May 19 2014 20:17:53
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    Thanks for the link, BuggyBoo! However, your link doesn't work. I took a quick look from a previous thread. It looks like a rerun.

    JustChecking, not a therapist / bug pro
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  3. Distressed in NJ

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon May 19 2014 22:31:37
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    "Victims almost entirely drained of blood". Ugh.

    This needs to be declared a public health crisis resulting in the return of DDT. I know people here oppose that, but it was the only thing that truly worked against bed bugs. This problem will only grow worse with current failed methods. I don't see what there is to lose by at least trying this.

  4. endless_nightmare

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon May 19 2014 22:43:28
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    some experts believe DDT would not work on the more modern strains of bed bugs

    declared a public health crisis

    totally agree with you there, just look at the psychological damage it does..., I'm sure productivity has somehow been greatly affected by this, people not being at their best from lack of sleep from worry...

    everyday there is a post by a sufferer who is at the end of their rope, drained of energy

    a brand new method that would kill all of them in one go is what we need

    of course if people didn't pick them up in the first place we would not be dealing with this

    Andrea
    not a PCO
    Spinal Cord Injury Advocacy/Volunteer
  5. Distressed in NJ

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon May 19 2014 23:13:15
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    some experts believe DDT would not work on the more modern strains of bed bugs

    Perhaps, but we won't know unless we try. Currently there is no other method that would kill them all in one go. I don't see what there is to lose by trying DDT for this purpose.

  6. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon May 19 2014 23:42:08
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    Bed bugs were reported to be thriving in African huts treated with DDT for malarial mosquitos. They began to show pesticide resistance to DDT as early as 1948.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  7. P Bello

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon May 19 2014 23:49:15
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    A recent university study exposed wild caught bed bugs to 100,000 ppm of DDT and only 50% or less of the BBs exposed were killed.

    As such, even if we had DDT back for such use, it would not be very good !

    It is what it is ! pjb

  8. Distressed in NJ

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue May 20 2014 8:02:05
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    I've heard these points being made before, yet bed bugs were virtually non-existent in America for several decades, which coincidentilly began with the introduction of DDT. Also the effective pesticides propoxur and Mialothon (not sure if I have the spellings correct) were banned in 1996 and bed bugs returned with a vengeance a decade later.

  9. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue May 20 2014 8:20:30
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    Hi,

    As discussed and researched DDT is not the answer.

    Declaring them a priority on public health grounds is essential. In the UK I first asked for them to be tracked pest issue in 2008 but lobby groups blocked it very quickly. There are two key things that will make a huge difference to the bedbug problem:

    • Public education of the issue from a school level upwards
    • Tracing all treated cases to obtain accurate information and to ascertain the real extent of the issue

    After that the only step which will have a massive impact and could lead to control within 3 - 5 years is to issue detection devices under a public health program with trained treatment staff available to fix the issue.

    At this stage the issue has literally gone too far for education alone to be the winning solution.

    It will also however take an increase in the quality and accuracy of the information put into the media because "what makes good TV" does not always make for good public education. This scare TV tactic does nothing but reinforce the stigmas and incorrect assumptions. Its a shardenfreude culture that has long left a nasty taste in my mouth and I personally wish to have nothing to do with. You would be amazed how quickly a TV researcher gets off the phone when you say "OK to be clear from the start I will not be part of any program which humiliates or degrades anyone".

    Sadly the lack of traceability and accurate reporting of the issue only serves to hide to true economic impact of the problem and the reality that we are already past the point where the direct and indirect costs associated with the level of bedbugs in society would more than pay for a complete program of public education and routine screening. I think the last significant and accurate number was Australia 2005 with an estimated economic impact of $100,000,000.00 AUD per year. Which equates to about $12 AUD per household. Next time you see the US number quoted divide it by the number of households and see what number you get, its a lot higher than you think and although the cost per household may not seem significant remember that to date not everyone has had bedbugs, that may still be yet to come.

    Sorry don't mean to sound all doom and gloom but its the reality.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

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  10. Distressed in NJ

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue May 20 2014 9:25:23
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    Not sure why lobby groups would oppose making bed bugs a public health priority.

  11. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue May 20 2014 14:51:47
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    Distressed in NJ - 5 hours ago  » 
    Not sure why lobby groups would oppose making bed bugs a public health priority.

    It took me a long time to work it out but eventually someone was nice enough to explain that they felt "the tent was not big enough yet". I asked them to clarify if they meant by that statement the reality that they needed more bedbug infestation to make more revenue from it spelt the end of the conversation.

    Sorry but not everyone seems bedbugs as a problem that should bring society together to create a solution.

    David

  12. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue May 20 2014 15:32:02
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    Distressed,
    No one is disputing that DDT did a lot to bring bed bugs under control after the war. However , insects develop resistance to pesticides which makes them less effective in time.

  13. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue May 20 2014 16:04:36
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    HI,

    Its also worthy noting that we can hardly go back to penicillin with MRSA and C Diff as sadly a lot of the early science was a little non specific in the mode of action and as such mutations tended to knock out whole classes of products in both medical and pest applications.

    Rather than bringing back DDT you wish should more accurately be for a new version of DDT or a product that actually works as well as people used to think it did. One of the common links with a lot of the DDT archive images is that they did not exactly appear to be giving the place a light "spritz" with the stuff.

    I am not sure such liberally application patterns would be supported by consumers and regulatory bodies.

    David

  14. JustChecking

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue May 20 2014 18:00:42
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    David wrote,

    I think the last significant and accurate number was Australia 2005 with an estimated economic impact of $100,000,000.00 AUD per year. Which equates to about $12 AUD per household. Next time you see the US number quoted divide it by the number of households and see what number you get, its a lot higher than you think and although the cost per household may not seem significant remember that to date not everyone has had bedbugs, that may still be yet to come.

    That 'that may still be yet to come' is S C A R Y !!!

  15. Daylight

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue May 20 2014 18:45:04
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    It all comes back to public awareness and education. We've got to help our current human population know what to do to prevent and eliminate bed bug infestations.

    IMO, people would more likely be interested in proactive measures that promote their well being if they understood the detrimental and costly effects that bed bugs bring. It's definitely a health related issue, physically and emotionally.

  16. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed May 21 2014 6:41:24
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    Hi,

    Yes if we are to trust the 1 in 10 figure that is quoted to indicate that 10% of the US population had been exposed to bedbugs its not difficult to see that with the current growth that could tap out at about 8 in 10 before anyone decides to do the right thing.

    Sadly to date the focus has been on "shock and awe and look at the horrid conditions these people live in" which is the opposite message to "show some compassion for these people who are suffering and avoid getting into that mess yourself".

    The solutions are already in place to handle this more effectively but there is such a resistance to moving things forward down the correct path for various reasons. There are either too many parties with vested interests (addicted to the toxic tit) or professionals trying to protect their own "turf" by not seeing the benefits in working in a more progressive way.

    The only people who loose out in a big way are those who end up with bedbugs and while the social stigma is maintained by the status quo they are kept divided and isolated. This does not sit well with me and represents a huge social injustice.

    As you can see its a subject I get very passionate about very quickly but that is mainly because the it drags on for too long.

    David

  17. BuggyB00

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu May 22 2014 17:41:17
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    JustChecking - 2 days ago  » 
    Thanks for the link, BuggyBoo! However, your link doesn't work. I took a quick look from a previous thread. It looks like a rerun.

    Yikes. Yes, it does seem to be a re-run. I noticed that the page to
    which you link contains a link whose URL contains a serial number.
    I'm starting to not trust such URLs with serial number because they
    are sometimes ephemeral URLs that are situation-specific. Just in
    case, googling also returns a
    [url=http://www.cbc.ca/doczone/episodes/bite-me-the-bed-bug-invasion]URL
    that does not have a serial number[url].

    bed-bugscouk - 2 days ago  » 
    It will also however take an increase in the quality and accuracy of the information put into the media because "what makes good TV" does not always make for good public education. This scare TV tactic does nothing but reinforce the stigmas and incorrect assumptions. Its a shardenfreude culture that has long left a nasty taste in my mouth and I personally wish to have nothing to do with. You would be amazed how quickly a TV researcher gets off the phone when you say "OK to be clear from the start I will not be part of any program which humiliates or degrades anyone".

    I think that a scare tactic *can* stigmatize, but it can also create
    the impetus to push for prevention practices and programs. Let's face
    it, it's darn scary. Fortunately, this CBC documentary touches on the
    stigma and the toll, as well as trying to dispel myths and impart good
    practices.


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