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Carpet beetle larvae advice.

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  1. iamscared

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Jan 4 2012 4:13:15
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    **I know this forum is not for carpet beetles but since most here have them or deal with them I couldn't think of a better place to post it**
    I have already read David's guide for carpet beetle larvaes, which recommends vaccuming which I can't due to the narrowness of the gap.

    Hello,

    While tearing down my room for looking for BBs I have found about 4 carpet beetle larvae (1 of which escaped into a deep corner I could not access).

    I found them all in the same place - in the narrow gap between the headboard and the mattress.
    http://img31.imageshack.us/img31/2065/sdadxo.png

    My vaccum cleaner hose does not fit in, so I will be buying a long crevice tool to clean this area more thoroughly later on.

    But for now, how do I make sure there isn't anything in the gap? I have checked with flash light for hours, and only found these 3 and the one that escaped.

    Can I put in some moth balls (Transfluthrin 0.52%) inside and seal the bed perimeter with tape?

    Thank you for any input!

  2. iamscared

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Jan 4 2012 10:18:54
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    Bump.

    Sorry but I would really like some guidance on this.

    Thank you very much.

  3. bedbugman

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Jan 4 2012 15:03:31
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    A few beetles are nothing to worry about most homes have one or two

  4. iamscared

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 5 2012 5:41:40
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    Thanks bedbugman for your reply.

    I have mentioned earlier that I wasn't able to catch one of them as it moved pretty quickly through an area that was not easy to reach.

    I am not sure if I should use the Rentokil Insectrol Spray (Contains:Permethrin 0.46% d-Allethrin0.13%) cause while their website says it treats carpet beetle, David Cain has written in his carpet beetle document that using insecticides might make the matter worse.

    David - if you're reading this, could you please tell us what you think about this product and if it is necessary?

  5. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 5 2012 6:10:17
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    Hi,

    I think the product should be banned for crimes against bedbug infestations because it causes drift between rooms but that's not going to happen because the over the counter market for insecticides is about 90 times larger than the professional use one.

    Unless they are in large numbers or you are responding to the allergens carpet beetles are not a concern beyond cleaning.

    If you think about the anxiety you are currently putting yourself through I would hope that you put this into perspective. As I know some people who read and participate on this forum do pick up neurosis from others I would hope you also put this into check for the sake of them as well.

    David

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  6. iamscared

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 5 2012 6:20:44
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    Thank you for your reply, David When loubugs posted "You probably have an advanced dermestid infestation in the home" it gave me another wave of panic. But since I've only found four of these, I am going to stand down and do regular cleaning in those areas.

    I will follow your advice and not use the insectrol spray. I will put some mothproof balls (Zensect) in my wardrobe just to be safe.

    One last question: I have a hard case suitcase near that area, with zipper very tightly closed - is there a big chance of the larvae going inside? I have now covered it with several layers of bin bags but I am unable to inspect its contents (mainly wool) at this point.

    I am sorry about sounding anxious in all my posts but dealing with insects is new to me, and my OCD doesn't help, but I will make sure I keep my panicky tone in check and not spread the pessimism.

    I am extremely grateful for the time you spend on replying to our posts!

    Thank you once again!

    PS. Thanks to your advice I think I've finally battled out the BB paranoia, but I will stay vigilant from now.

  7. P Bello

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 5 2012 8:22:49
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    Dear imscared,

    I doubt that the carpet beetle larvae will be able to enter your suitcase if tightly colsed.

    Usually these critters are few in numbers but, they may build up a number of individuals in a given area when an attractive suitable food source is present.

    The trouble is that this food source may be located in an inaccessible area that is difficult to find, if at all.

    The good news is, it is rare that these critters are so numerous or troublesome that work is warranted.

    As an example, and i may have posted this on this thread previously, whilst cleaning up around my office in the last few days I did discover a cache of these guys. they were feeding on a single pellet of rat chow in a small cardboard box. My guess is that they were in there for a number of years, possibly five(?) or more. In any case, they had built up to about 50 to 75 individual larvae happily existing in an otherwise closed box that would have easily gone on undiscovered if I hadn't decided to straighten up a bit.

    My guess is that you may continue to find a few stragglers of these larvae. Note where you find them and how many. Then, if you simply must know, begin your search but understand that the source may be something as minor as an abandonded mouse nest or activity where the mice may have stockpiled a small amount of food stores. And, that this resource may be hidden in a wall void or in an attic area under some insulation.

    In any case, I'm glad you're on the mend and you're able to put your worries behind you !

    Hope this helps, paul b.

  8. iamscared

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 5 2012 8:43:08
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    Dear Paul,

    Thanks for your reply. I can confirm that there are no real dead animal sort of source anywhere near by (I live on the 8th floor in a 11 storey apartment - no trees around - no window shade etc.) but there were some human hair in that gap. But in any case I really can't see why an adult carpet beetle would choose my room to lay eggs.

    You say your cache might have been infested for several years, but don't the larvae mature to adult in about 11 months and then die within a few weeks? And since they feed primarily on pollen etc, they couldn't have added to the population, isn't that right?

    Thanks for your input.

  9. P Bello

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 5 2012 8:53:32
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    Yes, somewhat.

    (I wasn't referring to a dead animla as much as the food stuffs the animal may have carried in to store.)

    The adults seek to get outdoors where their food sources are located.

    It's a cruel world, some larvae may never make it to adulthood successfully.

    The good news is that my basement only has two "windows" from which daylight might draw the emerged adults. The bad news is that I already vacuumed the larger area (it's a double door with lots of glass) and I wasn't much interested in a close examination for the presence of adult beetles at the time. (Too much pressure from my domestic boss to get things cleaned up on the homefront !)

    However, I can check at the other window area to see what I find there as it hasn't been cleaned/vacuumed yet. My gues is that I should find at least one adult that expired whilst seeking the outdoors (perhaps banging its head pathetically against the glass as it slowly expired?).

    In the bug world, that could be its own version of a movie I suppose. But, what if it didn't make it past the spider webs and was visciously preyed upon by an eight legged monster?

    See, it is a tangled web after all and I simply can't take the drama !

    Hope this helps, have a great day and put your bug worries to rest ! ! ! paul b.

  10. rAVENSFAN99

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 5 2012 9:48:07
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    For anyone reading this, please know that OCD is a treatable, if not curable, disease. I have a pretty severe case that was under very good control before my (actual) bb infestation. I am still struggling but try to put my behavioral training to use and as a result I am able to function. Please know that while OCD is very debilitating, it does not have to be all-consuming.

  11. iamscared

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 5 2012 9:48:49
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    Hey Paul,

    I am confused now, you said you found 50 larvae ish, but how can they be alive for 5 years? Unless of course new ones came in every season to lay eggs in that thing. I was hoping that the one that escaped would die, but now I am worried how long it will take and how much damage one of them can do.

  12. P Bello

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 5 2012 12:40:02
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    They are slow developers, the basement is not heated and it's a tad cool down there so that helps to slow things down.

    Those that develop leave that area. Others that don't make it, expire.

    It's biology, not an exact type thing.

    pb

  13. P Bello

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 5 2012 12:41:30
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    Let's not assume that if 10 eggs are laid that all 10 become adults nor that it the refernece books say that the life cycle is X that it actually occurs in X time.

    It is what it is. pb

  14. loubugs

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 5 2012 18:07:22
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    Don't forget that the larvae hatch from eggs and the larvae are very small to start out with- much less than 1mm. You often see the larger larvae and these, if mature, are searching for a place in which to pupate. The infestation can be some distance from the actual larval collection site, possibly under the flooring to the subfloor area. The larvae, especially if food is low or temps are cooler, may require to develop a few years until pupation and adulthood and the life cycle is not annual. The population of carpet beetles will give rise to adults yearly, however. It's an overlap of generations from different broods.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  15. P Bello

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 5 2012 18:09:21
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    Yes, thanks Lou ! ! !

  16. iamscared

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Jan 6 2012 4:09:01
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    Thanks for your replies!

    One question though: When they do mature and become adults, they *need* to leave outside to get pollen right? So the chances are that what I have now will be the last generation because they aren't really going to mate here?

    I found a sticky yellow patch on my bed frame (on the inside) does this have anything to do with carpet beetle larvae?
    http://img254.imageshack.us/img254/1925/46972764.jpg

    Thank you.

    I live in a quite a small studio apartment, so everything is visible except under the bed which is where I found them after inspecting there for the first time in a year or so.


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