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Carbon Dioxide Treatment - Methods

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  1. CDavid00

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Jun 21 2014 12:38:04
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    Although I've read some skeptical receptions on this site, the published, replicated research (see e.g. Carbon dioxide fumigation for controlling bed bugs and Use of solid carbon dioxide for controlling bed bugs under laboratory conditions) indicates that carbon dioxide treatment is highly effective.

    While obviously not practical for fumigating entire living units (yet), it would seem practical for sanitizing items like laptops, other electronic devices, books, collections of papers, and other things that may not react well to heat treatment. Once the CO2 dissipates, the items are completely safe and undamaged.

    The easiest method I could discover is detailed in the first paper cited. Essentially one places the items to be treated into a 42 gallon bag along with (handle carefully and thoroughly research first ~3 pounds of dry ice. The bag is loosely sealed (allowing CO2 to escape as the dry ice sublimates) and is placed in a very well ventilated area (outside, preferably) for 24 hours.

    Unseal the bag while still in a very well ventilated area and leave it open for a time to allow the CO2 inside to dissipate (breathing in high concentrations of CO2 is not a good idea, to put it mildly). All bed bugs and eggs inside should be dead.

    Unfortunately, the first paper does not describe in great detail the degree to which the bag should be sealed/unsealed in order to achieve and maintain the necessary concentration of CO2. One wants the bag to fill with CO2, but does not want the bag to rupture (which I think it would if it were completely sealed with 3 lbs of dry ice inside).

    I would be curious to know whether anyone has additional details on how to use the above treatment safely and effectively. My greatest concern is obviously the safe achievement of CO2 concentration within the bag.

    Even better would be a description of how to use this process on a smaller scale (e.g. a 1 gallon ziplock bag and three books - how much dry ice to achieve necessary concentration without rupturing the bag from excessive pressure).

    Dry ice is quite cheap (a few dollars for a few pounds). If we can develop a reliable and safe process that anyone can replicate, then the problem of treating sensitive electronic and other items will be easily resolved by anyone with a bed bug problem.

  2. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Jun 21 2014 12:43:02
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    There are already things you can seal in a plastic bag (in this case, tightly sealed) with your non-heat-treatable items and kill bed bugs (e.g. DDVP strips such as Nuvan Prostrips -- see Useful Stuff page).

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  3. CDavid00

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Jun 21 2014 13:04:55
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    Thanks Nobugs!

    I looked into the strips, but the DDVP strips pose greater safety issues, cannot be used with some items, can require more than a week of exposure, and even then do not seem to be 100% effective. I also have concerns about ongoing questions about the effects on human beings of exposure to DDVP.

    CO2 seems like a cleaner solution to be, if it could be implemented. Nothing left after treatment, completely effective, no unknown side-effects on human beings.

  4. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue Jun 24 2014 9:38:47
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    Hi,

    Please keep any and all samples you test with CO2 for 7 days after they return to normal air to see how many wake up.

    Only when you get 100% dead 100% of the time will you have a solution.

    Having already done this many times using chemical reactions as well as CO2 tanks I can assure you it does not work. The wake up rate is alarming and the only think more shocking is the lapse and lackadaisical pseudo science that these fools try to pump out. An ESA paper on this was retracted the other year once the author repeated the work and actually kept the samples to make sure they were dead amusingly said paper mentioned this website and scoffed at our "scorn" at the idea.

    Sorry folks the "scorn" was and is experience, been there, done that, not only have the T shirt but I had the afternoon off work from the "head kicking" headache you get when you expose yourself to CO2 enriched atmosphere. Too much and you don't wake up as you pass out into the highest concentration and suffocate.

    I would agree that DVVP is no longer an option but rather than just the fact that is a chemical the world does not actually need its also proven not to be as effect as the label claims and that many academic studies so failures.

    I know its a pain but solution are in the pipe and there will be better, simpler and cleaner ways to do this soon.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro

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