Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Bed Bug Treatment

Car treatments:

(27 posts)
  1. victimized

    new username: help_me
    Joined: Nov '10
    Posts: 305

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Nov 17 2010 14:10:23
    #



    Login to Send PM

    So, the guys are supposed to come out this Friday between 12-5 to do the first treatment. I am incredibly apprehensive about this as I just want the problem gone. They keep reminding me of the 90 day guarantee, I told the guy, I don't want my money back, I want the problem resolved!

    Anyway, I am super paranoid about our car having bugs as well as my parent's car and their home. No one I have spoken to as of yet can give me any real information about treating cars to be sure there is nothing. In fact, most act like it's a rare situation and have never addressed such a problem before.

    I read that regular vacuuming (according to the inspector) and high temp steaming would really help. However, I would like to be very certain and try to do both in combination with Nuvan strips in the car. I know nothing about this stuff and need to do something ASAP as I fear we will get treatment only to re infest the house unwittingly by using our car! Using the car is pretty necessary, too.

    Please give me your advice, suggestions, etc.

  2. DougSummersMS

    oldtimer
    Joined: May '07
    Posts: 1,957

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Nov 17 2010 17:39:54
    #



    Login to Send PM

    The vehicle can be fumigated with Vikane gas which is highly effective with no chemical residue leftover in the vehicle.

    The Vikane gas treatment will take about 24 hours and comes with a 90 day guarantee.

    Nuvon Prostrip + (DDVP) is an organophosphate pesticide that is packaged as a resin strip that gives off vapors.

    Here is a link for the Nuvon product label
    http://www.amvac-chemical.com/media/pdf/products/specimen_labels/Nuvan%20Prostrip+%20Specimen%20%2812679-3%29%20-%20CPS%20-%2002-19-10.pdf

  3. victimized

    new username: help_me
    Joined: Nov '10
    Posts: 305

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Nov 18 2010 12:47:30
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I have read about the Vikane gas but cannot find anyone locally who has even heard about treating a car let alone will do it!

  4. Callisto

    junior member
    Joined: Jul '10
    Posts: 95

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Nov 18 2010 16:59:47
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I called a pest control firm with that question, and they recommended vacuuming and spraying with a product called "Wilson Pro Aerosol", what looks like a non-residual spray. I've seen a few people ask about the DDVP/Nuvan method in treating their car (this is an issue that's been weighing on my mind for several months) and the general consensus is that it's not recommended due to the risk of poisoning yourself, but if you're going to do it, make sure that you're not actually going to be driving the car for several weeks, and to air it out thoroughly before you start driving it again.

  5. Richard56

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '10
    Posts: 2,223

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Nov 18 2010 17:25:50
    #



    Login to Send PM

    No harm in vacuuming and steam, and do heed the advice given if using the Nuvan Strips. But before going to the time and expense of Vikane (or Nuvan for that matter) why don't you have the car inspected by the PCO and/or monitor with something like the Bed Bug Beacon. At least one experienced PCO here has stated they have never seen a car infested by bed bugs, so I think it fair to assume that it's uncommon at best, and perhaps something not to worry too much about.

    Richard

  6. SearchandDestroy

    senior member
    Joined: Sep '10
    Posts: 452

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Nov 19 2010 17:54:12
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I had a bug in my car...not sure if he had a partner but there was definitely one because I squished it. Got in there, I believe, because I transported bedding stuff to the laundromat and I guess wasn't careful enough with it.

    Our PCO came out and steamed the car for about 2 hours. Then he sprayed Phantom under the seats which I heard later was a bad idea.

    We got a quote for vikaning a car and it was $500. We said no thanks. Had the dog try and sniff out the car but it's sort of difficult to get into all of those cracks and crevices. The steam and the phantom seemed to have worked as I haven't been bitten in the car for over 2 months now.

  7. mbr439a

    newbite
    Joined: Oct '10
    Posts: 7

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Nov 19 2010 21:56:27
    #



    Login to Send PM

    While riding home in my truck (about 650 miles) after having had an infestation in our condo and having it treated by a PCO my wife felt she was still getting bitten. When we got home we parked the truck and called a number of PCO's (including some National companies) who all told us they did not treat cars. Finally I contacted a local family owned PCO who has been in business for 40 years who, after coaxing, agreed to treat my vehicle only after signing up with him for a yearly pest control contract for my home. They inspected my house and gave us the all-clear on the house but charged me $200.00 to spray and bomb my truck. I still don't know if any BB's were in there but I feel 99% more comfortable after they treated. The PC company felt my wife was getting bitten by BB's she might have picked up in her jacket she wore home after the infestation in our condo. Those clothes were left in the truck and discarded.

  8. victimized

    new username: help_me
    Joined: Nov '10
    Posts: 305

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun Nov 21 2010 18:44:38
    #



    Login to Send PM

    mbr439a - 1 day ago  » 
    While riding home in my truck (about 650 miles) after having had an infestation in our condo and having it treated by a PCO my wife felt she was still getting bitten. When we got home we parked the truck and called a number of PCO's (including some National companies) who all told us they did not treat cars. Finally I contacted a local family owned PCO who has been in business for 40 years who, after coaxing, agreed to treat my vehicle only after signing up with him for a yearly pest control contract for my home. They inspected my house and gave us the all-clear on the house but charged me $200.00 to spray and bomb my truck. I still don't know if any BB's were in there but I feel 99% more comfortable after they treated. The PC company felt my wife was getting bitten by BB's she might have picked up in her jacket she wore home after the infestation in our condo. Those clothes were left in the truck and discarded.

    Well, if I did try this and I contacted someone who would come out only if I agreed to sign up for a service plan and wanted to inspect my house, I am already working with a PCO. Not only that, as of the other day the inspector SWORE once again that it is very unlikely and that vacuuming the car with a car wash vac should make us OK and that one of his guys wasn't careful and got his truck infested after going to an elderly woman's home who had them and has asked to take some trash out for her. Not sure why he would put the trash in his truck instead of in a can or how they got into the truck if the trash was in the back but supposedly they fixed the problem by vacuuming. He says he keeps his vehicle in check by getting it detailed every week.

    I am almost afraid to put in a monitor because, as my mother puts it, "don't go looking for trouble." Wish I had a magic 8 ball that was 100% correct and I could ask that for a yes or no. It has been getting cold here at night, down into the low 30s with frost all night and 40s all day, maybe low 50s. The guy also said they won't do well in the cold and now that it's getting this cold at night I shouldn't worry about it. My parents have been saying the same thing but I juts don't know. I have bites on my bum, but they could have been from sitting in bed for over two hours the other day. However, I am not certain they aren't from sitting in the car either. We vacuumed it out as best as we could at the car wash yesterday anyway, and have been trying to keep our time in the car as limited as possible. Not to mention trying to keep the heat off while in the car.

  9. Bug wary

    member
    Joined: Oct '10
    Posts: 135

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Nov 24 2010 11:57:17
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Friends,

    In light of the strong recommendation that we dispose of our vacuum bags after each vacuum if we have or suspect bed bugs, how do we feel about the appropriateness of going to a car wash and using the vacuum there?

    Next question, what about car washes and detailing as asource of infestation. I note my car wash reuses rags. In fact, I read of a study that found that steering wheels had a large amount of e coli on them because rags used to wipe tires were also used to wipe steering wheels. Yikes!

  10. cilecto

    oldtimer
    Joined: Aug '08
    Posts: 4,085

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Nov 24 2010 14:00:47
    #



    Login to Send PM

    It's recommended that you seal and toss your vacuum bag because surviving bugs can crawl out of the vacuum and into your closet between uses.

    With a car wash vac, the risk (if any) would be (IMHnonexpertHO) to the facility and those who service the vacuum. Possibly also if a bug happened to be on the hose or tip and climbed off with you or the detailer not noticing.

    One thing I wonder about is that there's a huge hollow space under a car seat, hard to reach but IMHO ideal for BB to hang out in.

    I guess anytime someone or something comes into your car, there's a transfer risk, I guess mitigated by whatever mysteries are supposedly minimizing the spread of bugs in cars.

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  11. Bug wary

    member
    Joined: Oct '10
    Posts: 135

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Nov 24 2010 14:42:21
    #



    Login to Send PM

    "With a car wash vac, the risk (if any) would be (IMHnonexpertHO) to the facility and those who service the vacuum. "

    Precicsely.
    And if we take precautions with infested furniture etc. disposal, is it ethically correct for us to use vacuums at car washes if we believe our vehicles to be infested? I'm just trying to get my head around what I might do if I thought I had a problem in the car. Just hoping that if I do -20 C will knock them out. I note that you're from Winnipeg, as am I.

    How goes your battle and who have you been using?

  12. cilecto

    oldtimer
    Joined: Aug '08
    Posts: 4,085

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Nov 24 2010 15:46:32
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Forgot to add: no reason you can't use your home vac, with the usual precautions.
    BTW, I'm in NY and (hopefully) not fighting an infestation.

  13. Bug wary

    member
    Joined: Oct '10
    Posts: 135

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Nov 24 2010 16:04:19
    #



    Login to Send PM

    My apologies cilecto. I forgot to insert Callisto's name who is also on this thread before the Winnipeg remarks . Stream of thought. I certainly don't wish anyone an infestation. Very bad karma.

    Yes, using the home vac is , of course, a possibility or the shopvac. I think in future I'll likley be doing my own car cleaning, save exterior. The thought of having bed bug carrying 3rd parties in the car has spooked me. Now, what to do with the mechanic?

    Thanks for your input.

  14. SearchandDestroy

    senior member
    Joined: Sep '10
    Posts: 452

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Nov 24 2010 23:12:57
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I think a vacuum to rid a car of bugs is like trying to rid bugs out of a sofa with a vacuum. Too many cracks and crevices. Steam is necessary (in my non expert opinion).

  15. bait

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 559

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Nov 24 2010 23:51:02
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Victimized:
    If you use the dichlorvos strips, you may want to keep the heat running in the car. This is from an article discussing the heat/dichlorvos combination treatment.
    "High temperatures can help the action of volatile insecticides in several ways including: 1) increased pesticide volatilization from the strips, 2) increased pesticide circulation and bed bug exposure, and 3) increased insect metabolism and respiration, which increases the intake of pesticide by bed bugs."
    Roberto Pereira is the scientist conducting this research. His paper will be presented at the ESA meeting on December 12th.
    Bait

  16. Bug wary

    member
    Joined: Oct '10
    Posts: 135

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Nov 25 2010 8:40:45
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Bait

    Thanks for posting this information. I had, in fact, read somewhere that the strips don't work well unless the temperature is above 40F, a challenge if one lives in a winter climate unless one parks the vehicle in a heated garage.

    Did the piece mention vehicles? I wonder how long one would have to ensure the vehicle was heated in order for the strips to perform.

  17. insecticidal

    junior member
    Joined: Dec '10
    Posts: 94

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun Dec 5 2010 0:07:30
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hello, this is my first post. I was putting in place some countermeasures, when I noticed signs that a new infestation was already upon me (feces, exoskeletons)! I had also been experiencing increasing symptoms of bites.

    I now have my bed fully isolated, and put down a light dusting DE around my bed, on the frame, and in wall cracks and crevices. I'm feeling pretty good about things, but I'm still getting bitten... in my car!

    When carrying in some stuff from my car, I actually saw a bug jump off right after I got in the front door! That's my only sighting of an actual adult. I have not been able to locate it, since.

    Anyway, I've seen nymphs and eggs in my car and am definitely getting bitten. I've been vexed over what to do about it. I started with DE, but then cleaned most of it out, after learning about the dangers of inhalation. I'm definitely not liking the idea of any residual pesticide in there.

    I admit that I hadn't heard of vikane gas, and will have to look into the availability of those treatments, in my area. However, I thought of something that's available just about everywhere!

    I remembered reading that CO2 is pretty lethal to BBs:


    The treatment with 100 vol.-% CO2 lead to 100 % mortality of all stages within 6 hours.

    The air-mixture with 60 vol.-% CO2 produced the same effect within 24 hours.


    http://www.icup.org.uk/reports/ICUP511.pdf

    I wonder if "all stages" includes eggs!

    Interestingly, it seems there's more going on than just oxygen deprivation:


    Exposure of all stages to 98 vol.-% N2 (rest oxygen) had only little effect
    (10 - 20 % mortality) after exposure of up to 72 hours.

    So, my plan is to either rent a tank of compressed CO2 or get a block of dry ice, and leave it in my car on a fairly warm day, perhaps after first running my heater, for a bit. Actually, the temperature consideration probably argues in favor of the gas.

    Do note that CO2 displaces oxygen and can therefore kill you, if you do this in a garage or other enclosed space. The idea is to put the tank or dry ice in the car and walk away. The only thing I'm worried about is oxygen bubbles forming under the seats, but I figure that if enough CO2 gets pumped in, it will probably work its way into where it needs to go.

    Has anyone tried this? Even if it doesn't kill eggs, it's cheap & easy enough that I could do a second treatment after 10 days.

  18. Richard_Naylor

    member
    Joined: Sep '10
    Posts: 238

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 9 2010 11:43:00
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi insecticidal,

    I recently used this method to disinfest a large complicated camera bag that I had with me in a heavy infestation. I put a ventilated pot of live bugs in a deep pocket in the bag as a positive control (to check it worked) and then put the whole bag in two bin liners and flooded it with CO2 from a tank in the lab. I took care to flush CO2 into all the pockets and compartments. I then sealed the bag and left it over night. By the following morning the bugs in the pot looked dead. But over the course of the day they came round. They never fully recovered and still couldn't walk properly after several days, but only about half were killed.

    I have no doubt that CO2 will kill them if you can maintain a sufficiently high concentration, but therein lies the problem. It is much harder to completely seal a car than it was for me to seal the bag. There will also be oxygen in the foam of the seats and other air spaces that are hard to reach. Even if you pipe in CO2 through a slightly open window and then seal up the car as best you can, the air in the foam/glove box and other spaces will gradually equalize with the CO2 in the main volume of the car and the CO2 concentration will consequently drop.

    Perhaps if you keep replacing the CO2 by flushing more in from a tank, you will slowly be able to replace all the oxygen, but based on my experience with the camera bag, I don't think that will work. Sorry.

  19. insecticidal

    junior member
    Joined: Dec '10
    Posts: 94

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 9 2010 18:00:52
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks for the feedback!

    I have a fold-down back seat (it's a sedan/saloon type car). I was hoping to place a large tank in the trunk, with the pressure regulator set to deliver a constant, slow feed. Initially, I was going to start with one window cracked open. Then, I would close all the windows, which my car does when you lock it from the outside.

    Perhaps I can maintain better concentration in most spots than in your case, due to the constant positive pressure. However, your point about seat foam is good and one about which I am concerned.

    It's starting to get pretty cold, where I am (down to -5 C, at night). This works against the CO2, but I feel that if I can do this on a relatively warm day, perhaps the cumulative stress and mortality from my heater, the cold, and some DE I tried to rub in the seams of the seats and interior will cause the car infestation to wind down. I don't need the CO2 to kill them in every part of the car - just where cold and heat are having difficulty doing the job. Probably still wishful thinking, eh?

    BTW, one facet I find interesting is the idea that CO2 even kills eggs. The abstract I cited above (thank you NYvsBB!) says "all stages" and refers to eggs as one of the "stages" included in the trials.

    I wonder how much CO2 lethality would increase at warmer temps. This approach might be much better suited to spring/fall weather, where the car can easily get warm (I'm thinking 30+ C), but is still well below the thermal death point.

  20. jrbtnyc

    Member
    Joined: Sep '10
    Posts: 998

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 9 2010 20:52:07
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Speaking of car washes earlier in the thread – has anyone looked into developing a "PackTite treatment for cars". Wouldn't it be fairly straightforward for car washes to offer an enclosed heat treatment for automobiles. I guess the issue would be whether the time required could be sped up to be considerably shorter than 4 hours while still getting even heating throughout the vehicle sufficient to eliminate all bb's and eggs. Would it be possible to aim for higher temperatures than 120°F. A lot of cars in places like Las Vegas when parked for hours in sunlight in summertime (amazing how many hotels, office buildings, etc. have parking lots that have been there for decades but...no trees whatsoever to provide shade!) get to quite high temperatures anyway with no evident ill effects (is that correct). So it would seem like a promising avenue.

  21. SearchandDestroy

    senior member
    Joined: Sep '10
    Posts: 452

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 9 2010 21:46:46
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Well..I tried the packtite in the car idea...thinking it would work. It was a warm summer day so I put the packtite in the trunk and ran it. Got to 137 in the car but below the seats..still only 90 or so. Was bummed, seemed like such a great idea (in the summer). Steam was the answer for me.

  22. jrbtnyc

    Member
    Joined: Sep '10
    Posts: 998

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 9 2010 22:15:11
    #



    Login to Send PM

    SearchandDestroy – what I meant to suggest was a procedure where the car gets enclosed entirely by some dedicated structure that heats it from without – didn't mean to propose putting an ordinary PackTite into a car to heat it from within.

  23. SearchandDestroy

    senior member
    Joined: Sep '10
    Posts: 452

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 9 2010 23:44:46
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I know..but if you're going to create a dedicated structure to drive the car into, then you might as well just use Vikane.

  24. insecticidal

    junior member
    Joined: Dec '10
    Posts: 94

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Dec 10 2010 4:17:50
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I guess it's not surprising that CO2 kills them. It seems to be more nasty than I thought. I got this from a MDSS for it:

    1%: Slight increase in breathing rate.
    2%: Breathing rate increases to 50% above normal; prolonged exposure can cause headache,
    tiredness.
    3%: Breathing increases to twice normal rate and becomes labored. Weak narcotic effect.
    Impaired hearing, headache, increase in blood pressure and pulse rate.
    4-5%: Breathing increases to approximately four times normal rate, symptoms of intoxication
    become evident and slight choking may be felt.
    5-10%: Characteristic sharp odor noticeable. Very labored breathing, headache, visual impairment
    and ringing in the ears. Judgment may be impaired, followed by loss of consciousness.
    50-100%: Unconsciousness occurs more rapidly above 10% level. Prolonged exposure to high
    concentrations may eventually result in death from asphyxiation.

    High concentrations of this gas can also cause an oxygen-deficient environment. However, the asphyxiating properties of
    Carbon Dioxide will be reached before oxygen-deficiency is a factor.

    Given how harmful it is to humans, I guess it's surprising it's not more lethal to bugs!

  25. AbugMess

    newbite
    Joined: Dec '10
    Posts: 34

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Dec 10 2010 4:20:28
    #



    Login to Send PM

    insecticidal - 10 hours ago  » 
    Thanks for the feedback!
    I have a fold-down back seat (it's a sedan/saloon type car). I was hoping to place a large tank in the trunk, with the pressure regulator set to deliver a constant, slow feed. Initially, I was going to start with one window cracked open. Then, I would close all the windows, which my car does when you lock it from the outside.
    Perhaps I can maintain better concentration in most spots than in your case, due to the constant positive pressure. However, your point about seat foam is good and one about which I am concerned.
    It's starting to get pretty cold, where I am (down to -5 C, at night). This works against the CO2, but I feel that if I can do this on a relatively warm day, perhaps the cumulative stress and mortality from my heater, the cold, and some DE I tried to rub in the seams of the seats and interior will cause the car infestation to wind down. I don't need the CO2 to kill them in every part of the car - just where cold and heat are having difficulty doing the job. Probably still wishful thinking, eh?
    BTW, one facet I find interesting is the idea that CO2 even kills eggs. The abstract I cited above (thank you NYvsBB!) says "all stages" and refers to eggs as one of the "stages" included in the trials.
    I wonder how much CO2 lethality would increase at warmer temps. This approach might be much better suited to spring/fall weather, where the car can easily get warm (I'm thinking 30+ C), but is still well below the thermal death point.

    -We are in Germany and so communication with our PCO is a little tough sometimes. He did mention he is treating our house with some kind of CO2 spray as well..... what he wrote down for us I translated to read as: Kills BB at all stages, BB eggs as well
    BUT, I want to say he used other chemicals as well so I'm not sure if it was meant for the chemicals, or the CO2 treatment.

    Oh well, thigs are going good for us so far and we get our second treatment too. I will try to ask him to clarify then.

  26. jrbtnyc

    Member
    Joined: Sep '10
    Posts: 998

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Dec 10 2010 4:26:38
    #



    Login to Send PM

    SearchandDestroy - 4 hours ago  » 
    I know..but if you're going to create a dedicated structure to drive the car into, then you might as well just use Vikane.

    Hmm, that brings us definitely into the technical realm and I don't know nothin'. What would be the comparative logistics, economics, and time requirements of a "PackWash" vs. a "VikWash". Using Vikane, would the structure have to be flushed out each time a new vehicle comes in, discarding the gas? Would that be a slow process and expensive because of the cost of the gas used only one time? Would disposal of the gas be an issue? Or could the gas, or most of it, somehow be reused for successive treatments? Maybe that could work if the vehicles are on a conveyor belt so they don't have to have a human driving them in and out like a regular carwash? Overall would it be viable if hundreds of vehicles per day are coming through? (Now I should go read those other threads discussing Vikane treatments in detail which I haven't yet done.) Whereas using heat these issues would be entirely different I would think, perhaps with a good chance that much of the heat applied to each vehicle could be retained for the next vehicle, especially in summertime.

  27. jrbtnyc

    Member
    Joined: Sep '10
    Posts: 998

    offline

    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun Dec 12 2010 15:57:38
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hey, see GotEmHA's post of Sun Dec 12 2010 15:44:43...

    GotEmHA - 8 minutes ago  » 
    Have you considered having a thermal treatment done on your moving truck? This was really effective for me – I was able to keep almost all of my belongings, including a previously infested bedframe and dresser, and I didn't have to buy a packtite or wash all of my clothing before the move. A canine inspection of the new apartment after move-in confirmed that the treatment had worked and I brought no live bugs or viable eggs into the new place. Huge relief.

    on...

    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/moving-want-to-be-sure-im-not-followed .

    Over on that thread, I'm going to ask GotEmHA to elaborate on how much was the cost, how the thermal was administered, etc..

    If it can be done for a moving truck then why not for ordinary cars too? (Or, does the thermal only heat the contents of the truck's carrying area, not the entire truck including the driver's area including under the seats, under the floor, etc.; so wouldn't really do any good for cars.)

    It's good news if this technology is already in place that everyone can be aware of, and maybe will start to become widely available as entrepreneurs sniff the $$.

    Are there any threads on this already, or a FAQ? Or company advertisements that I missed?


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

294,649 posts in 49,518 topics over 153 months by 21,698 of 22,141 members. Latest: carterscott, ohkayiguess, shawnpayne1982