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Can they ever be got out of sofas?

(24 posts)
  1. ladybug

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Jan 15 2009 23:06:18
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    I have a lot of questions tonight as the bb dog confirmed an infestation today. I think its pretty severe as the dog alerted on several places including the sofa. I was reading the faqs regarding steaming, which the PCO is going to do, but I'm wondering if its worth it for our sofa? Its so big and the cushions are so thick, if they are really in there, could steaming and spraying really get rid of them or should we face it and throw it out? The dog alerted to the bed too but I know the encasements should be able to help with that.

  2. Itchy-Scratchy

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jan 17 2009 21:15:40
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    I thought I'd leave a note in order to boost your question to the top of the forum again.

    Unfortunately, I can't answer. Our couch somehow never got infested. I don't know if it's the fabric (microsuede) or just dumb luck, but I'm grateful nontheless!

    Has anyone out there ever successfully treated their couch?
    Kate

  3. Omega

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat Jan 17 2009 21:40:10
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    I personally threw out my couch. I did not want to take a chance of getting any kind of reinfestation even with treatments. There were just too many areas of the couch that could have an egg on it. After seeing a live bug crawling up the side arm that was enough for me to get it out of my apt and on to the street. I ripped up the couch so no one could take it and labled it bedbugs!

    My bed is in the best encasements and isolated. So far, so good. 4 months without a bite (and I get very bad reactions to bites).

  4. Marixpress

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jan 19 2009 15:38:03
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    Omega - 1 day ago  » 
    I personally threw out my couch. I did not want to take a chance of getting any kind of reinfestation even with treatments. There were just too many areas of the couch that could have an egg on it. After seeing a live bug crawling up the side arm that was enough for me to get it out of my apt and on to the street. I ripped up the couch so no one could take it

    Same here

  5. Overwhelmed

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jan 19 2009 15:49:46
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    Only one of my two couches showed signs of infestation, and like the others responding, I threw it out. It was an old leather couch that wasn't in great shape (although I have to say that I loved that couch and it was sad to lose it) and it just seemed like too much time and effort to save it. I imagine it is possible to save a sofa, but also fairly difficult.

  6. dottie

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jan 19 2009 15:57:49
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    I threw mine away, too. Just too complicated.

  7. phantom1

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jan 19 2009 16:09:08
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    I threw mine out too. I live in a studio apartment and it was too close to where my bed folds out (murphy bed) and also was a sleeper sofa so I felt like I needed to. It was really comfortable but it seemed like the best way to go....

    I am fumigating a lot of other stuff tho

  8. bugbasher

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 20 2009 10:09:42
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    Hi,
    Just thought I'd let you know it's possible to save the couch and I know from other posts that I'm not the first to do it.Mine is leather w/ non removable cushions.It's a lot of work to do it(you must turn it over repeatedly to spray the underside w/ the netting removed and carefully inspect it to find any visible harborages,but if you're up to it ,it's doable.You must go over every seam,crevice w/ a bright flashlight and have an interest in detective work! Good luck PS- Have a can of bedlam or similar handy to spray harborages,and no they won't be easy to find!

  9. BakedBedBugs

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 20 2009 11:48:48
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    If it is available in your area thermal treatment will save your couch every time.
    Best of Luck.

  10. ladybug

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 20 2009 12:15:53
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    Okay, you convinced me, the sofa's going. The PCO is coming to spray and steam tomorrow so will wait until after that and then bag it all up and put it out. We're not too heartbroken as we were debating whether to get a new one or not so that decision's been made pretty quickly. We do have a beautiful leather armchair though that I will do everything I can to save - the bb dog didn't alert there so hopefully we can salvage it.

    We're also getting rid of the guest bed, toddler's chair and headboards. Hoping to save our bed by using encasements.

  11. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 20 2009 13:21:47
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    Hi,

    Dont forget to protect the item before you move it through the house.

    Disposal details can be found here:

    http://www.bedbugbeware.com/index_files/Page324.htm

    That website is next for an overhaul so the link will change in a week or so.

    David

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  12. parakeets

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 20 2009 14:02:33
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    I had to throw out my couch. There were just too many bedbugs in it and too many places they could hide that couldn't be treated. It was easier to toss the couch than have it ineffectively treated over and over. At a bedbug convention I went to they said that you didn't have to toss furniture, but they didn't explain how a PCO could treat infested furniture with 100% certainty that they got all bedbugs, nymphs and eggs out of it. They did say the most common piece of furniture that had to be tossed was the box spring.

  13. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 20 2009 14:16:04
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    Hi parakeets,

    I hate to say its just plain and simple experience and a willingness to look at the problem from a very different angle.

    I would never say that I get 100% of the bed bugs out on the first go but its a lot cheaper to deal with a sofa in situ than to replace it. Based on UK prices admittedly but ti should settle soon.

    David

  14. Bugologist

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 20 2009 15:18:24
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    To add my two sense into this topic, I will say that sofa's can be difficult to deal but it greatly depends on the level of infestation. Lightly to moderately infested couches are salvagable and the bugs should be pulled out of a couch in at most 2-3 services. Typically the couch isn't the only item infested so the house would probably need service anyway and thus the couch isn't holding up control of the problem.

    That being said, if a couch is highly infested it may be best to dispose of it. There are so so so many folds, cracks, crevices, areas that are difficult to get pesticide such as up inside the couch, etc.. for the bugs to hide that they can be very very difficult to get out. Not to say it can't be done but it may take so many services that the cost of the services outweigh the cost of the couch.

    I agree with BakedBedBugs in that heat can be a better option for infested couches but in my experiences, it still doesn't always work. Some couches are so plush and fluffy that heat has a hard time penetrating all cracks due to the excessive fabric and stuffing. One again though I will reiterate the Tony is working with a heat system that tends to provide much higher temperatures than the system I'm working with so maybe he sees 100% results while I see 95-98%.

  15. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 20 2009 16:16:57
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    Bugologist

    Would DDVP strips be a viable option to treat the couch?

    I spoke to a Amvac rep at the FPMA conference a couple of weeks ago that said their DDVP strips will be relabeled for bed bugs in the near future.

    Otherwise, I agree that thermal treatment should be effective.... if the couch can be heated uniformly to the core above the lethal temp range. A thermal IR camera can be useful to evaluate the penetration of the heat into insulated areas.

  16. Bugologist

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 20 2009 16:41:27
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    I don't think DDVP is a trustworthy options for couches but at the same point I'm not saying it wouldn't work. One thing we don't know about DDVP is how well it penetrates into cracks and crevices and some preliminary thoughts are that it might not penetrate very well at all. Therefore, I'm not sure I would trust it to get rid of the bugs.

    Also, DDVP does have a distinct odor associated with it. It probably would work out of the couch eventually but if it didn't, it may ruin the couch. It's one thing to treat a piece of luggage and then it smells a little compared to a couch you sit on constantly.

  17. BrooklynNurse

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 20 2009 19:30:31
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    I threw out my 3 couches cause it wasn't worth the hassle and they weren't even infested. I just wanted to have less hiding places for them to go in.

  18. parakeets

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 20 2009 20:41:00
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    I stayed at some beach houses in Cape Cod last summer. The Boston area has a huge problem with bedbugs, and rental housing where there is frequent turnover has similar problems to hotels. I found that in several of the weekly rental cottages there no longer were **any** couches or stuffed chairs in the living room. They were replaced with things like a fouton on a frame, a webbed cloth sling-type couch, or by several wooden or plastic chairs. I guessed what was going on. I've seen hotels that used to have a stuffed chair with ottoman in the room. No more. Now you have to sit on the bed or at the desk. I rarely see a hotel with a stuffed chair anymore. There are subtle changes going on everywhere that you only catch if you have bedbugs.

  19. eatenalivenh

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Jan 20 2009 23:19:57
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    Wow looks like most got rid of the sofa! My sofa is actually brand spanking new got it for X mas from my mom before I knew I had bed bugs at that time I thought I was getting spider bites. Tossing the sofa for me is not an option but luckily I have not seen anything there.

  20. bugbasher

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Wed Jan 21 2009 9:37:54
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    Eatenalive,
    Don't even sit down on it until your treatment is comeplete,then the bugs should have no reason to go there.If you use it there's a good chance they will too.

  21. Inflictious

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu Jan 22 2009 5:13:47
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    Yes they can be removed from couch's , i have done my fair share oh heat treatments to several homes and i personaly have managed to save all of ppls belongings.. as long as the thermal company knows how hot to get it everything should be fine. If the company is new i am sorry to say for you that your home for them is trial and error. But yes they can be killed!!!!!

  22. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Jan 23 2009 2:25:19
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    Inflictious - 21 hours ago  » 
    Yes they can be removed from couch's , i have done my fair share oh heat treatments to several homes and i personaly have managed to save all of ppls belongings.. as long as the thermal company knows how hot to get it everything should be fine. If the company is new i am sorry to say for you that your home for them is trial and error. But yes they can be killed!!!!!

    Inflictious, most people here probably don't have access to thermal. I think it is a lot harder to eliminate bed bugs from a sofa with sprays and dusts. I have heard of people doing it, but it is not easy. One guy here sprayed his sofa for 6 months...

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  23. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Fri Jan 23 2009 2:27:27
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    bugbasher - 1 day ago  » 
    Eatenalive,
    Don't even sit down on it until your treatment is comeplete,then the bugs should have no reason to go there.If you use it there's a good chance they will too.

    Yes, if they have not taken hold yet, then this may be very good advice.

  24. bbgirl

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Mar 15 2011 9:16:39
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    Purchase a sofa encasement.....if it's a good sofa it's worthwhile - you can use it encased for a year or so and they should all be dead and then no heavy chemicals have been applied. Otherwise where are you going to sit?


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