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can short-term residuals be used on clothing, shoes if you wait before wearing t

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  1. twitchyscratchy

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Dec 14 2009 13:50:15
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    myself 3 months ago would have balked at the notion of spraying chemicals anywhere, letalone on shoes & clothing. but not the new me!

    so.. any thoughts? i know pyrethrins are not a long-acting residual. some military/hunting clothing is impregnated with permethrin to stem malaria, etc. so what if i sprayed down some items (shoes, mainly) with a fine spray of wilson PRO aerosol (piperonyl butoxide, pyrethrins) and waited several months before wearing them.

    is this sheer stupidity?

    thoughts?

  2. wchicago

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Dec 14 2009 14:02:53
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    hi twitchy

    i know nothing about wilson pro. . .BUT it occurs to me if you're willing to give up these clothes and shoes for a few months before wearing - why not buy a hot shot pest strip and pop them in a sealed XL ziploc with the pest strip for a few months instead? store the sealed bag somewhere that is not in a consistently occupied part of your house, if you can, so just in case there are escaping fumes it won't hurt you <like a garage would be fine, or a closed storage closet -the label says it should NOT be used anyplace where there is human occupancy more than 4 hours per day>.

    you can find the strips at home depot and ace hardware and online. they kill bedbugs, and when the eggs hatch, they kill the baby bedbugs. you leave stuff in the sealed bags with the strip for 2 months (which is overkill, but better safe/paranoid than sorry). air out the bags (NOT IN YOUR HOUSE) and no harmful residue will remain on the items.

    look for DDVP or pest strip in the search box - or wait, here is a video about their use

    http://tv.bedbugcentral.com/index.php/2008/10/bbctv-episode-5-product-review-hot-shot-no-pest-strips/

    i have used the hot shot strips for books and knick knacks -then i got a packtite which is a godsend. which is what i now use to treat clothes/shoes/books/pretty much everything that can fit in there that can't be put in a dryer if you have the money <or have been a very good person and ask for one from santa>, packtites rock.
    best of luck to you!

  3. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Dec 14 2009 20:16:02
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    I wouldn't try to treat your own clothes or shoes with pesticides.

    Remember, that there is only one pesticide labeled for use on mattresses and furniture. Many more pesticides are labeled for use on, say, baseboards.

    The difference between mattresses/furniture and baseboards is that one of these objects is something we come into contact with for as much as 8 hours a day.

    The toxicity of chemical pesticides is something that is well outside my area of expertise. However, I know enough to know that good PCOs, as well as the companies that manufacture the clothes you're talking about, know the science of how concentrated a particular chemical is and how much of it to apply to the surface in question.

    As a layperson, you don't know that, and if you start experimenting with chemicals and get it wrong, you're risking pretty serious consequences.

    Also keep in mind that plenty of experts in the field of bed bugs believe that pyrethrin resistance is a real problem in at least some bed bug populations. Treating your clothes with a pyrethrin, therefore, may not even be effective. Worst case scenario is that even if you did it safely in terms of exposure levels, you might end up not killing the bugs or maybe even repelling them, causing the infestation to scatter and get more entrenched.

    The Packtite is an option that costs $ up front but may be cost effective in the long run.

    Storing them in airtight containers with DDVP is also a much safer off label use if you must do so PROVIDED you do not store or open the bags in inhabited structures.

  4. twitchyscratchy

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Dec 15 2009 8:05:31
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    thanks for your replies folks.

    i'll give a more detailed reply later, but for now suffice to say that i live in canada, where packtites aren't available (not even shippable) and where pyrethrins are the only available pesticide due to more rigid chemical regulations than the states. (but i go have the one i have is intended for use on mattresses.)

    i haven't done enough research on the availability of DDVP in canada. however, as most of us, i'm an apartment dweller with no garage, storage, space, basement, etc.

    can you just stick the bags outside? does temperature affect the efficacy of DDVP?

    thanks again for your thoughtful replies.

  5. twitchyscratchy

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Dec 15 2009 8:06:53
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    i meant i "do" have, not i go have!


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