Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Detection / Identification of bed bugs

Can bedbugs disappear then reappear every few months?

(10 posts)
  1. Kbwj

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Mon Nov 12 2018 22:51:16
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    Is it possible for bedbugs to disappear for a few months then reappear 3-4 months later? This has happened to us 3 times now. Only finding them in one room, which we don’t sleep in and frankly never go in except to check for bugs or when one of us is sick. We won’t see any for months, thinking we beat the problem, then will randomly find one on the bed.

    Getting the most recent bug identified tomorrow in case we’re maybe dealing with bat bugs (we don’t know that we have bats but we do live in a historic house.). Would this type of behavior be more consistent with bat bugs?

    So confused and frustrated. We’ve been dealing with these bugs for year! No signs of bites etc just finding these live bugs.

  2. keephopealive

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Nov 13 2018 5:04:03
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    2 things I can think of; either they are coming from attached neighbors and you're seeing the odd straggler, or you're not finding every bug/egg and they are hibernating rather than making their way to other rooms, possibly due to a lack of CO2/human scent in the affected room which would entice them to feed?

    Has the affected room been treated and if so do you know which treatments were used?

  3. Kbwj

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Nov 13 2018 6:39:47
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    We live in a single family home so it’s unlikely they’re coming from a meijbor.

    Is it really likely they are still hibernating from a year ago when we startted to treat? I’ve thought the same thing as well but it just seems strange. For example, the one I found yesterday was a teenager not a full adult. My husband did sleep in that room about 2 weeks ago when he was sick. No bites or signs of activity. Prior to that it had been probably 2 months since anyone has slept in that room. I’d imagine a teenager wouldn’t be able to hibernate as long as an adult and wouldn’t they be more active in general so they can move on in their life cycle (needing to feed)?

    Ohhh I’ve lost track of the treatments. We’ve worked with a pco for the year we’ve done various chemical sprays, steam, everything short of heat treatments. We may do a heat treatment at this point because we’ve just had if. It’s just SO EXPENSIVE and

  4. Kbwj

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Nov 13 2018 6:40:30
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    And I worry about our house structurally since it’s 200 years old.

  5. keephopealive

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Nov 13 2018 7:31:34
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    The way I see it, the best approach is via a process of elimination.

    You can check bugs from neighboring units off the list which does simplify things a bit.

    The bugs can hibernate for long periods of time; I believe that if a potential host is nearby they will normally seek harborage as close as possible to save on energy. The fact that this isn't happening in your case seems slightly more unusual, but it is possible that the late stage nymph you found was either hibernating OR has been bought in from another source, which could be why you're only finding the odd bug.

    The way I would approach this is as follows:

    1. Ask an expert on this forum, such as Lou to ID a specimen. You're correct that there is a chance it could be something else.

    2. Get an experienced PCO inspection. Alternatively you could avail yourself with as much info as possible regarding how to look for signs and do a fingertip search of every single area in the affected room as well as other potential harborages in other rooms such as the sofa/beds etc.

    3. Purchase some suitable monitors to help narrow down the source/affected areas. Especially pertinent if you don't react to the bites.

    4. Get the appropriate treatment and continue to monitor.

    Bear in mind that changing where you sleep and how often the room is used will complicate matters somewhat. The ideal is to consistently use the affected space and keep the bugs in one place while you kill the little blighters.

  6. bugged-cdn

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Nov 13 2018 18:51:50
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    Bed bugs won't hibernate in a dwelling when there's a host present. They will seek out the host and feed.

  7. keephopealive

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Nov 13 2018 19:18:19
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    bugged-cdn - 21 minutes ago  » 
    Bed bugs won't hibernate in a dwelling when there's a host present. They will seek out the host and feed.

    Hi Bugged-cdn,

    So is that to say that even when a room is not occupied for extended periods of time (such as in the OPs case) and no CO2 or human scent is present in the direct vicinity of the bugs, their host seeking behavior is such that they will always (and without exception) move rooms in search of a host? If so, which stimulus (or lack thereof) causes them to hibernate? Is it temperature or something else?

  8. Kbwj

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Nov 13 2018 22:56:56
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    Hi all,

    Dilemma in part solved. The bug was ID’d as a bat bug. Now we need to figure out where we have bats since we have no attic and the exterior of our house is brick covered with stucco. Hm.

    Wildlife expert coming out tomorrow morning.

    Found another bug (a baby) considering having this one identified as well, just to make sure we aren’t dealing with bed bugs AND bat bugs.

  9. keephopealive

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Wed Nov 14 2018 5:21:45
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    Kbwj - 6 hours ago  » 
    Hi all,
    Dilemma in part solved. The bug was ID’d as a bat bug. Now we need to figure out where we have bats since we have no attic and the exterior of our house is brick covered with stucco. Hm.
    Wildlife expert coming out tomorrow morning.
    Found another bug (a baby) considering having this one identified as well, just to make sure we aren’t dealing with bed bugs AND bat bugs.

    That's fascinating; I understand that it's a fairly unusual occurrence so I'm really interested to hear how this pans out and how you get it resolved.

    Out of interest, who did you get to identify the specimen?

  10. loubugs

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Wed Nov 14 2018 7:13:22
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    Kbwj - 8 hours ago  » 
    Hi all,
    Dilemma in part solved. The bug was ID’d as a bat bug. Now we need to figure out where we have bats since we have no attic and the exterior of our house is brick covered with stucco. Hm.
    Wildlife expert coming out tomorrow morning.
    Found another bug (a baby) considering having this one identified as well, just to make sure we aren’t dealing with bed bugs AND bat bugs.

    The scenario sounded like a bat bug issue to have them appear and re-appear. Adult bug is better for identification: ID is fairly easy. Bed bugs and bat bugs can go for long periods of time if they can't get a blood meal, but it's not that they hibernate. They will hunt for hosts if they are hungry, too.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.

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