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Bug ID Pretty Please - [a: gnats or midges, possibly fungus gnats]

(7 posts)
  1. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 10 2012 8:23:06
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    Hi,

    I know these bugs are not bed bugs, but I was wondering if some of the wonderful, handsome, all-knowing entomoligsts would help me Pretty Please! Whenever I stand or sit still for a while I feel like something is crawling/biting feet, ankles, and lower legs. I am 99.99 % sure there are no fleas present. Are they gnats, noseeums? Do they bite/sting?

    I have six Ultimate Flea Traps set up through-out my house. They are catching these teeny tiny bugs everywhere. In one room in the basement, which I am guessing is Ground Zero, after one day there were so many in one of the traps, I couldn't even count them. I had a fruit fly/vinegar fly problem this summer but these things are different.


    picture1 by picture account2012, on Flickr


    picture2 by picture account2012, on Flickr

    For Scale:

    scale by picture account2012, on Flickr

    1. What the heck are they?

    2. Do they bite/sting? If yes, why only feet, etc since they have wings?

    2. Where the heck are they coming from?

    3. How the heck do I get rid of them?

    Any help and/or assistance would be GREATLY appreciated!

  2. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 10 2012 9:13:30
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    Hi,

    I would have said gnats or midges, and yes they can bite although not all seem to be affected.

    They generally fly in from the outside so netting on the window is the best exclusion.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  3. loubugs

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 10 2012 10:02:09
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    Could be dark-winged fungus gnats, family Sciaridae. I'll see if I can look them over a bit later. They can breed in moist, potted plants, decaying plant matter, condensation and organic matter, etc. and can, of course, breed indoors; something is going on in your basement? They don't bite. As a matter of fact, many tiny, frail, mosquito-like flies are called gnats or midges and not all species bite. BTW, you shouldn't say noseeums right away because those flies are ceratopogonids and they are not invisible, but are very small. Unfortunately, whenever people experience unexplained "bite-like" reactions, the noseeum word pops up as a catchall. It's very much like saying that unknown lesions on the skin are always "spider bites". True spider bites are not very common.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  4. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 10 2012 10:54:18
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    Thank you so so soooo much handsome, wonderful, SUPER HEROS David Cain and Lou Sorkin!

    Regarding the basement. . . I'm assuming that's where they are coming from since the trap caught so many in such a short period of time. I had long term "guests" living down there until recently. They had trash in gargage cans that they weren't very diligent about taking out. And since we semi-recently finished a bedroom and bathroom down there we had an ejector pump installed. Lots of houses have ejector pumps, I don't have to worry about that, do I?!

  5. loubugs

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 10 2012 11:48:51
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    Explain about the ejector pump and make sure it doesn't have a cracked line. Often phorid flies are culprits in sewer lines, but can be psychodids, too. There are many species of Drosophila that are attracted to fermenting materials. These flies are unfortunately known as fruit flies, but a better choice is vinegar flies (has to do with fermentation byproducts that attract females to deposit eggs). There are true fruit flies that attack growing fruit.

  6. Bughatin

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Dec 10 2012 21:40:32
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    Funny cause have the same exact tiny "flies" that have shown up in our place in the last month (odd, being winter and all). At first I chalked them up to fruit flies and was more careful with disposing of uneaten fruit in our fruitbowl (especially bananas). But then I was still getting them, and it seems they are hanging out in the bathroom...long after I've stopped leaving fruit out. I have caught a couple and am wondering if they are drain flies instead, since my shower has a little drip that needs to be tightened. I poured bleach down the drain and kept it covered for the last 4 days and haven't seen any. If I catch another one I will def post a pic since you guys are so knowledgeable.

  7. loubugs

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Dec 12 2012 13:55:43
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    Drain flies typically belong to species in the families Phoridae or Psychodidae; specimens pictured in this post are neither, but yours could be. You should post a picture. Bleach probably has no effect on larvae developing in the organic ooze (if that's what's going on in your situation). The drain cleaners that are organic and bacteria-based will clean out the material and remove the nutrients used by the developing larvae.


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