Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Detection / Identification of bed bugs

Bug ID needed please [a: bat bug; Cimex adjunctus]

(14 posts)
  1. hansen

    newbite
    Joined: Jun '14
    Posts: 3

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Jun 25 2014 22:53:28
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I've looked through several posts on this forum, and these images seem to match the photos of bedbugs that are available. Can someone more experienced please confirm? Thank you!

    Bug-view2 by hansenjob, on Flickr

    Bug-view1 by hansenjob, on Flickr

  2. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,265

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Jun 25 2014 23:38:21
    #



    Login to Send PM

    It looks like a bed bug or closely related species (bat or bird bugs). It's important to rule out the latter.

    Do you see any fecal stains? Where did you find the bug? Are there any bats or birds nesting in or on your home?

    An expert will no doubt weigh in tomorrow.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  3. KillerQueen

    oldtimer
    Joined: Mar '08
    Posts: 4,271

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jun 26 2014 0:46:21
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Sorry, it's an adult male bed bug.

  4. hansen

    newbite
    Joined: Jun '14
    Posts: 3

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jun 26 2014 8:43:25
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Yes, bats are nesting in the eaves of my house.

    No, we have not noticed any fecal stains. We have not noticed any blood stains or any bites on us.

    Also, there aren't very many of these bugs --- after getting a little panicked last night, we searched the house for a couple of hours, and only managed to find five more bugs (two live, three dead). They were all this same size -- I didn't find any bugs that seemed to be in a different 'stage' of the life cycle, nor have we yet found anything resembling eggs.

    If it is bat bugs instead of bed bugs, what are the implications of that? Is it "better" for it to be bat bugs instead of bed bugs? Are the control measures we should take the same? As a starting point, we were planning a thorough vacuuming of the baseboards and carpet, attempting to remove clutter, and perhaps purchasing a dry steam unit.

    Thanks for your assistance, I truly appreciate it.

  5. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 18,192

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jun 26 2014 8:50:08
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    Good call NoBugs, its a little too hairy and the colour is slightly off. The presence of bats and lack of faecal is pointing towards the fact that it may be bat bugs not bedbugs (Lou careful for you job - someones coming up fast, LOL).

    What I would suggest that you do is start calling around and asking people about experience with dealing with bat or bird bug issues. Once you have someone you are comfortable with ask them to come and confirm the ID which they should do before they start. They will then be focusing on excluding the primary host and then treating the area from the harbourage back into where they are ingressing.

    I have written a primer on this which can be found at:

    http://www.BatBugs.com

    The treatment method is very different and as such the usual steam and DE and declutter does not always help. The good news on the clutter side is that bat bugs return to the primary harbourage after feeding so will not get into your things.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  6. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,265

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jun 26 2014 9:41:42
    #



    Login to Send PM

    bed-bugscouk - 50 minutes ago  » 
    Hi,
    Good call NoBugs, its a little too hairy and the colour is slightly off. The presence of bats and lack of faecal is pointing towards the fact that it may be bat bugs not bedbugs

    Yes, I thought he looked a bit hairy.

  7. loubugs

    old timer
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 12,286

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jun 26 2014 9:56:18
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Yes, it is a bit hairy for a Cimex lectularius, but it is a male. Color is off for the adult of the common bed bug as well. There are some other structural characters that would not place it in Cimex lectularius. As David pointed out, treatment is different for this species compared to the common bed bug because their major host is different and their behavior is very different. BTW, where do you live?

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  8. AbsolutelyFreaking

    oldtimer
    Joined: Sep '12
    Posts: 1,720

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jun 26 2014 10:16:54
    #



    Login to Send PM

    hansen,

    Your photos are really clear and crisp! May I ask how you took them? Were they by scanner?

  9. loubugs

    old timer
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 12,286

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jun 26 2014 12:34:08
    #



    Login to Send PM

    They're 600 dpi resolution but small images size.

  10. hansen

    newbite
    Joined: Jun '14
    Posts: 3

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jun 26 2014 12:34:40
    #



    Login to Send PM

    loubugs - 2 hours ago  » 
    BTW, where do you live?

    I live in western West Virginia, near the border with Ohio.

    According to this Ohio State fact-sheet, "In Ohio, most of the specimens from homes are bat bugs (Cimex adjunctus) rather than bed bugs (Cimex lectularius)." So, I would presume that the situation here in WV is likely similar.

    AbsolutelyFreaking - 2 hours ago  » 
    hansen,
    Your photos are really clear and crisp! May I ask how you took them? Were they by scanner?

    Yes, I scanned them using a fairly low-end Canon scanner/printer, at 600 dpi. Wish I had access to a better scanner, because I'd like to compare the length of the pronotum to the bug's eye, which the Ohio State fact-sheet indicates is a way to distinguish between bed- and bat-bug. Maybe I'll try to hunt down a microscope...

    So, my treatment plan is to attempt to eliminate the bat roosting area (i.e., attic vent passage) through improved screening, then thoroughly vacuum the area and kill any visible bugs with 91% isopropyl alcohol, and then spray that area and surrounding area using either or both of (a) prallethrin & gamma-cyhalothrin (i.e., 'Hot Shot Bedbug & Flea'), and/or (b) 3-phenoxybenzyl-2-dimethyl-3-cyclopropanecarboxylate & N-octyl bicycloheptene dicarboximide (i.e., 'Raid Max Bed Bug & Flea'. Any feedback on this plan or these chemicals?

    Thanks again to everyone for their useful advice and input. I really appreciate your kind assistance in sharing your expertise with strangers.

  11. loubugs

    old timer
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 12,286

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jun 26 2014 14:02:26
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Yes, I scanned them using a fairly low-end Canon scanner/printer, at 600 dpi. Wish I had access to a better scanner, because I'd like to compare the length of the pronotum to the bug's eye, which the Ohio State fact-sheet indicates is a way to distinguish between bed- and bat-bug. Maybe I'll try to hunt down a microscope...

    600 dpi was good. Picture -- must have cropped it -- is just small. That said, you don't have to bother comparing setal length, etc. It's evident in your pictures. It's a bat bug. I was going to suggest C. adjunctus after reading where you live.

  12. P Bello

    oldtimer
    Joined: Nov '11
    Posts: 4,863

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jun 26 2014 15:42:14
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Dear Hansen,

    Sorry you have a bug situation !

    In the recent past I was called to inspect an apartment complex near there due to a "reported" bed bug problem.

    However, I could tell that it was likely bat bugs rather than bed bugs prior to entering the building and apartment in question due to the characteristic "rub marks" present on the building soffit, fascia and trim boards created by bats as they enter and exit their various entry points of the building. Of course, closer inspection revealed the presence of several live bats within the attic and that the insects were bat bugs.

    Experienced and competent pest pros know that correct pest identification can be critical to success which is so when considering remediation work for bat bugs vs. bed bugs. However, specimen color alone can be subjective and unreliable for a variety of reasons. Note that photo color, clarity and overall presentation may vary from pc to pc as well so, there's that.

    In advanced and long established infestations we've seen bat bugs present in nearly every room of a home. Such was the case in a log cabin inspected and treated just months ago. In fact, this infestation was very much like a typical bed bug situation with a bed bug infestation thrown in as a bonus so, it had to be addressed accordingly.

    Remember that "the bugs do what the bugs do" and that one of the things they don't do is read the books and adjust their behavior to conform with what's written 100% of the time in 100% of the cases. We know what we read, what we expect, what's typical and what we actually see in the field based upon our experience and observation.

    With bat bugs we expect that they will be located in close proximity to where the bats are found. Usually, bats enter attics, soffits, vents and other areas where they can find suitable acceptable harborage. They can enter structures via surprisingly small entry points.

    Of course, here you have a compound/complex pest issue: a) You need to eliminate the bat bugs, b) You need to remove the bats, c) You need to eliminate any other pests present due to the bat infestation, d) You need to eliminate remove the bat feces and e) You need to disinfect the areas affected. Note that the attic insulation may be contaminated with bat excrement to the point that it must be removed and replaced as well. Additionally, know that bat excrement may contain certain pathogens which can be harmful if contacted, inhaled or ingested by humans. As such, you are best served to do additional research such that you are suitably informed and adequately protected !

    While it would be ideal, it is difficult and impractical to attempt to eliminate 100% of the bat bugs without eliminating the bats as well. However, when the bats have been eliminated the bat bugs then may become more problematic to you since their primary & preferred host is absent. Further note that bats are protected and should not be killed. They can be eliminated from buildings successfully using appropriate methodologies.

    Depending upon the duration and state of the bat and bat bug infestation, there may be a significant amount of work to be done.

    Please advise if any additional questions or concerns.

    Hope this helps you ! pjb

  13. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,265

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Jun 27 2014 0:06:48
    #



    Login to Send PM

    hansen - 11 hours ago  » 

    loubugs - 2 hours ago  » 
    BTW, where do you live?

    I live in western West Virginia, near the border with Ohio.
    According to this Ohio State fact-sheet, "In Ohio, most of the specimens from homes are bat bugs (Cimex adjunctus) rather than bed bugs (Cimex lectularius)." So, I would presume that the situation here in WV is likely similar.

    The PDF version of this fact sheet includes "12/2004" at the bottom, suggesting it was published or last updated ten years ago, when bed bugs were just starting to come back.

    These days, bed bugs are a huge problem in Ohio, and I think it's safe to say most cases in Ohio are not bat bugs these days, but bed bugs.

    That said, it does seem likely that bat bugs are common enough in Ohio or WV.

  14. KillerQueen

    oldtimer
    Joined: Mar '08
    Posts: 4,271

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Jun 27 2014 13:55:02
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Sorry I jumped the gun and said bed bug. I didn't enlarge the photo (looking on my phone) because it was so clear I just looked at it and shot from the hip.

    Best of luck!


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

297,396 posts in 50,186 topics over 156 months by 21,933 of 22,434 members. Latest: Kimmmie46, esedndwi, Help123