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Bug ID [a: not bed bug; likely psocid/book louse]

(12 posts)
  1. scarlet87

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Oct 9 2013 11:29:31
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    sorry, first link didnt work!here it is:
    http://flic.kr/ps/2AAPWe

  2. Nemo

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Oct 9 2013 12:00:34
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    <- non-expert

    I think that's a book louse and a tiny spider. Second specimen is very poor, though.

  3. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Oct 9 2013 12:05:04
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    Hi,

    100% not bedbug.

    Most likley a Pscocid.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  4. scarlet87

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Oct 9 2013 12:10:56
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    thank you for your response! yes im sorry about the poor resolution but this is the best i could get with my camera. just to clarify because i didnt mention this but both these bugs are about as big as a speck. I have been getting bitten for the past month and actually found an adult bed bug last week. but there are no other signs. i had an exterminator come in and check and all he found was what he said were fecal stains (like 3 black dots. thats it). and he said its a mild infestation and that its possible that the adult bed bug was the only one i had but he could not rule out the possibility of that bed bug having laid eggs. he did not find any evidence of eggs though. so i guess there r two possibilities: the bed bug i found was a male (i never got to find out because i got rid of it before taking a picture), or it was a female and has laid eggs. I havent gotten bitten since i killed the one bed bug last week. i put catchmaster traps under my bed and after a couple days this is what i found (in the photos i uploaded). ive been paranoid all week and really would like to have these bugs identified as soon as possible. if anyone can ID them for sure that would be a great help! THANK YOU!

  5. scarlet87

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Oct 9 2013 12:16:02
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    thank you bed-bugscouk! i really hope that is all i have right now. i have been having such bad anxiety this past week. i know that it is always most likely that bed bug hitchhikers are pregnant females but what is the likelihood that it is a male hitchhiker? does it really not happen all that often?

  6. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Oct 9 2013 12:20:32
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    Hi,

    I know I am right that its not a bedbug.

    The only slight doubt (maybe as high as 5%) is on the confirmation of Pscocid. If you go to http://www.bed-bugs.co.uk/pscocids.html the PDF document should give you high resolution clear images to compare and contrast with.

    Hopefully you can then come back and post to confirm.

    David

  7. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Oct 9 2013 12:26:30
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    Hi,

    There is a 50:50 chance on the sex of a bedbug so I am going to have to ask for your source that it's "always most likely that bed bug hitchhikers are pregnant females but what is the likelihood that it is a male hitchhiker".

    I would agree with the dumb statement that "infestation most commonly start with a pregnant female" but only on the grounds that males can't lay eggs.

    I hope your PCO tested the suspect marks with bedbug blue or all they can technically say its that may be faecal.

    I would suggest you look into the "Treatment by Passive Monitor replacement" protocol I have made available if its a light case its an easy way to resolve it and also an easy way to make sure its all clear at the end of the process.

    Hope that makes sense.

    David

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor.

  8. scarlet87

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Oct 9 2013 12:41:13
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    The exterminator that came told me that female bed bugs hitchhike more often than males because they try to escape the area they are in once the male impregnates her. i have also read the same thing. so basically i have felt that it's pretty much unlikely that it was a male that hitchhiked to our house. the exterminator did not test the "fecal stains". he just looked at them and declared that they were fecal stains caused by bed bugs.
    here it says: "Female bed bugs disperse more than any other stage, so it is likely that the bed bugs that “hitchhike” on people’s belongings are mostly females."(http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ig083). so u can see where i got the idea. but you are saying that it's a 50:50 chance? well that would honestly make me feel a lot better. i was not 100% convinced that it could not have been a male. thank you for your help!

  9. Nemo

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Oct 9 2013 13:24:09
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    If it helps, I brought home one male nymph, and on a separate occasion another male nymph tried to ride home on my shoe. My feeling is hitchhikers usually come from overcrowded situations where all life stages and both sexes may be roaming.

  10. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Oct 9 2013 13:46:47
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    Hi,

    Your PCO's knowledge is wrong.

    A US academic first declared that females bedbugs disperse to avoid the males based on what data I am not sure. In 2007 we studied a circa 150,000 live sample infestation as part of a project we conducted with Sheffield University in the UK.

    The data was the largest of its kind and proved that entomologists should not apply human emotions onto insects because the data disproved the theory. Since then academics have no longer taught that misguided belief.

    There was no sex biased distribution, lets face it bedbugs mate in a different way to humans so the theory of dispersal flies in the face of the basic needs for food, safe harbourage and a mate.

    Mathematically is 50:50 and you may want to introduce your PCO to Bedbug Blue as a more accurate way to diagnosing unless he wants to be put in touch with the people to supply the bedbug frogs.

    It does not mean your PCO is an idiot and no good, it just confirms they are not working from the latest accurate information.

    David

  11. loubugs

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Oct 9 2013 14:14:05
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    The exterminator that came told me that female bed bugs hitchhike more often than males because they try to escape the area they are in once the male impregnates her. i have also read the same thing. so basically i have felt that it's pretty much unlikely that it was a male that hitchhiked to our house. the exterminator did not test the "fecal stains". he just looked at them and declared that they were fecal stains caused by bed bugs.

    I've always wondered why people think that. The females mate more than once, so why escape? The females also do not mate every time mating begins; she contorts her abdomen and curves it under to not mate. If she has eaten, this action is more difficult to perform. If bed bugs mate and the female always wanted to leave, why are there so many bed bug infestations?
    Granted you will find lone females away from the group and staying on their own and soon with their eggs, hatchlings, etc.

    If it helps, I brought home one male nymph, and on a separate occasion another male nymph tried to ride home on my shoe.

    How did you know it was a male, if it was a nymph?

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  12. Nemo

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Oct 10 2013 17:27:55
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    loubugs - 6 hours ago  » 

    If it helps, I brought home one male nymph, and on a separate occasion another male nymph tried to ride home on my shoe.

    How did you know it was a male, if it was a nymph?

    I karyotyped it! Actually I read the males have asymmetric abdomen tips, and the one I found in my house did, though now that I think back I don't remember for sure if the one I found on my shoe did or not, and unfortunately do not have a good photo. I'm guessing the nymphs are not distinguishable? The one in my house had just shed and may have molted to an adult, though it seemed a little small still to me.


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