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Bites after first treatment, is this normal?

(9 posts)
  1. Cmarie32

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Sat Jul 1 2017 14:40:32
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    My bed bug nightmare started a few weeks ago with me getting bites (no other evidence), to finding a few live bugs later in the week. Landlord had a pco come in on Monday, who told me I didn't need to wash everything (aside from what I had already bagged up) and that it wasn't likely that the bugs were in my closet/dressers. Also asked if he was checking/treating the apartments that adjoined mine and he said no. He said the stuff he was spraying would kill them when they walked through it and that one treatment would be plenty.

    I only had to be out of the house for a few hours, he put some sort of powder all over the apartment and that was that. Had no bites from mon-fri, woke up today (Saturday) with new ones. Have yet to find any other evidence though.

    I'm assuming they were never truly gone, or these bites could be from a new crop that just hatched from eggs?

    From everything I've been reading on here, it doesn't seem like enough was done. One treatment without having the wash/dry all of my belongings seems too good do he true.

  2. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Sun Jul 2 2017 0:19:25
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    Bed bugs have to cross poison to die. They only feed once every 3-7 days or so, depending on various factors including environmental conditions (temperature, humidity, etc.) So they're not going to be instantly dead once treatment is done. And if it isn't time for that bug to feed, it's not going to cross the poison, because it's not coming out. That's one issue here.

    Another issue is bed bug bites are typically delayed reactions. You probably react hours, days or even a week or more after you're bitten. Most people don't know how long it takes for them to react. So it's hard to know if you are being bitten now or if you're reacting to bites from five days ago.

    As such, bed bug bite reactions are a poor measure of whether you still have bed bugs.

    The presence of new fecal stains is one good way to judge, if you know how to look for them, or the pro searches.

    Obviously, bed bugs are also a sign, but they're not as easily spotted in most cases, especially when there are few.

    You're right that more than one treatment may be needed, spaced about two weeks apart. I recommend learning to look for new fecal stains and maybe using bed bug monitors to help you spot signs.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  3. Cmarie32

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Sun Jul 2 2017 13:49:04
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    Thank you NoBugsOnMe! I've been scouring the bed like a mad person, and haven't found anything yet. Have even been checking in the later hours (2am-5am) which is when I found the live ones last time and nothing yet. The PCO did say that it could take up to three weeks to stop seeing signs of them. I just got super hopeful during those 3-4 days that I wasn't waking up with itchy welts.
    Definitely going to invest in monitors though. Other than the climb ups (i still don't have a bedfram, asked pco and he said it wasn't a necessity), what would you recommend? I know there's the big beacon, are you familiar with these: https://www.bedbugsupply.com/Bed-Bug-Alert-Pheromone-Monitor-And-Trap-By-Bird-X-_p_169.html at all?

    Thanks so much for your help :).

  4. Cmarie32

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Sun Jul 2 2017 20:32:54
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    Update: There are definitely still live bugs in the apartment, I found one (maybe 2nd-3rd stage) crawling on the sheet this afternoon which prompted me to do a full bed check. Found 5-6 fecal stains right near the head of the bed as well.

    I know I shouldn't be expecting instant results from a treatment. and the PCO did say give it up to three weeks. But, it's already been a week and still waking up with bites/seeing bugs. How early is too early to give them a follow up call?

    Also, what happens if you have go out of town after a treatment leaving no one home to be "bait" for these things? If there's nothing to attract them to the powder/to cross the powder, how's it going to work?

  5. BattleoftheBug

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Sun Jul 2 2017 22:24:58
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    If it were me, there is no way I would try to do this without a bed frame. A head board is not necessary. Even though I recall you put sticky tape around the bed, you've got to get it off the floor unless you want sheets and blankets to be falling over the edge where bugs can crawl up on them. The less you let any survivors bite you, the quicker they will die off.

  6. Cmarie32

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Sun Jul 2 2017 23:32:28
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    Thanks BedBugger :). Just set the bed up on a futon frame, and have double sided duct tape wrapped around the legs right where they touch the floor. Also got a better look at the box spring/underneath and didn't see any better evidence. This does bring up another couple of questions though:
    - adding the frame to the bed also added more crevices for bb's to hide, what are the chances of them taking up residence in the metal tubing of the futon frame? The futon was in the apartment when it was dusted, so there is still a dusting of cimexa on it.
    - Now that I've (hopefully) stopped any bb's from crawling into bed from the floor, what about any that may already be in the bed? I'm guessing they're kind of trapped up here now. The PCO dusted cimexa around the bed, but I'm not sure if it's actually in it.

    Thanks again for all of your help :). Definitely taking all suggestions to heart. At this point, I'll do pretty much anything to end this nonsense.

  7. Cmarie32

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Sun Jul 2 2017 23:33:58
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    *edit* That meant to say BattleoftheBug. Tellin' ya, these things have got me scatterbrained 😬

  8. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Sun Jul 2 2017 23:54:21
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    Cmarie32 - 10 hours ago  » 
    Other than the climb ups (i still don't have a bedfram, asked pco and he said it wasn't a necessity), what would you recommend? I know there's the big beacon, are you familiar with these [link to Bird X monitor] at all?

    A lot of people here use David Cain's Packtite Passive monitors or Climbups. The Packtite Passive monitors will work without a bed frame. I don't know much about the brand you linked to -- the various pros here haven't specifically recommended them as far as I can recall.

  9. BattleoftheBug

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Mon Jul 3 2017 13:26:50
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    I don't see why the double-sided tape around the legs wouldn't act as a monitor, as any bugs trying to climp up would be stuck there for viewing. I do have ClimbUp brand interceptors under the feet of my bed but never found anything in them--which is good. But a couple of other flying bugs [not BBs] got stuck in the tape I put around the legs for extra protection--so that works.

    I thought I was being bitten on my sofa over a month ago, so got rid of it and replaced it with a futon. I just think it's easier to inspect than a couch. However, a metal bed frame would have been even easier than a futon frame to use for your bed. My futon is only used as a couch in the living room. But, since a futon frame was what you had handy, it's still better than having your box spring directly on the floor, IMO. Ordinarily, a futon frame doesn't even need a box spring, but okay, if you want it there. I think that an encased mattress on the frame would be easiest to inspect in your circumstances. An encasement is all white and shows everything that might be on it better than anything colorful. It also keeps whatever might be inside your mattress trapped and unfed and no more bugs from invading the mattress. If something hatches inside the encasement, it's also trapped and will soon die. I know what you're going through and how hard it is.


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