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Bird Mites / Rat Mites !... thought we had Bed Bugs ...

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  1. bird_mite_survivor

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    Posted 7 months ago
    Mon Feb 18 2019 2:58:16
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    WARNING:
    First off, please be careful what you believe when you do a Google search for "Bird Mites." Despite having a degree in entomology, I had very little knowledge about mites and their relatives and I made the mistake of reading peoples' horror stories about bird mite infestations and thinking that mine would turn out the same way. There is a certain website that bears the name of the culprits, that I believe should be taken down altogether due to the fear-mongering it contains. I would have suffered much less mental anguish, had I dug deeper into scientific articles on the topic (they are much more difficult to locate online unless you enter scientific names).

    STORY:
    Our infestation started off with me getting bitten by some type of bug throughout my body while I slept on certain nights. Other family members were initially not affected, but over time, even my children were getting bitten. I sprang into action and went into bed bug detection mode, but I didn't come up with any specimens in the traps or in my thorough searches of the bedroom. Weeks passed and we were still being bitten. Sometimes we would feel a sharp "pin-prick" sensation when we were being bitten, but we never could find what was biting us. It wasn't until a family member discovered a very tiny (about the size of a period in this sentence) "bug" crawling on the kitchen table, that we had a suspect. At first I didn't believe the "dot" was even alive until it started moving. I used a piece of scotch tape to pick up the bug, and placed it under magnification (magnifying glass and microscope). To my surprise, I determined that it was a mite of some sort, but I wasn't certain of the exact species. I narrowed it down to either a rat or bird mite, and the university entomology department that accepted my specimens was unable to narrow it down any further, as they did not have an acarologist on staff. To our horror, we discovered there were hundreds of these nearly invisible mites crawling on the dark brown table and floor. By the end of the infestation, we would realize that there were tens of thousands of these mites. Once we figured out what they were, we had to determine where they were coming from. Over the next few days we confirmed that their highest concentration was on the kitchen table. Eventually we determined that new mites would appear out of nowhere as if they were dropping from the ceiling. It turns out that this is exactly what was happening. I got on a ladder and realized they were dropping down from the edge of a skylight that exists above the table. We called every single pest control company in a 100+ mile radius, and most of them didn't know what I was talking about, and those that did had no experience dealing with them.

    TREATMENT/SOLUTION:
    Once the mites and their apparent source were identified, I got on the roof to check for dead birds or rats, of which I found none. However, I did find a lot of leaf litter around the skylight and some rat droppings. I had the roof blown clean and had all of the shrubbery and trees trimmed far back from the roof line to reduce the likelihood that rats could make their way up there. I didn't identify any bird nests, which are another potential source. Since there is no attic space above the kitchen, this also could be ruled out.

    In hindsight, I would have temporarily moved my family into an apartment or another home for a few months until the infestation cleared on its own. However, at that point I was still under the impression that the mites would follow us wherever we went. This seemed to be confirmed by the fact that other family and acquaintances were being bitten by hitchhiking mites that I was taking to other locations on my clothing. The family suffered much mental anguish as we tried to isolate the young children and capture/kill as many of the mites as possible. We were up all night on many occasions steaming, bagging and laundering most of our belongings. The experience was a complete nightmare, mostly because the mites are so impossibly small and difficult to see or kill. They also move relatively fast for their size. This was the only time in my life where I've suffered from depression, but had I known the infestation was self-limiting, this would not have been the case. Our infestation lasted 3-4 months. It may have lasted a little longer had we not been proactive in reducing their numbers, but eventually they all died on their own.

    Here are some of the most effective methods of reducing and monitoring their numbers:
    1) We made CO2 traps (designed for bed bugs) using yeast to create CO2 which is piped into a cup with unscented talcum powder at the bottom and up the walls. We followed instructions on YouTube for CO2 bedbug traps using the "Williams Method." We placed multiple traps throughout the kitchen and in one bedroom. While these traps were somewhat effective at reducing their numbers, they were more of a monitor of how extensive the infestation was at any given time.
    2) We purchased an expensive steam cleaner to steam the area around the skylight and the kitchen floor. We also used it on some of the carpet in a nearby room. We were cautious not to over-saturate any areas with moisture so as to avoid issues with mold developing.
    3) We frequently laundered, dried and bagged all of our clean clothes in large clear garbage bags or extra large zip lock bags so we could reduce our chance of being bitten or carrying the bugs out of the house.

    Some things we did that were minimally effective, or not effective at all:
    1) We used double-stick duct tape to create a border around the kitchen floor to prevent the bugs from migrating to other rooms once they fell from the skylight. While this may have reduced their numbers in the other rooms, I personally tested the bugs and witnessed them walk, albeit at a much slower pace, across the sticky double-stick duct tape!
    2) We placed the disk shaped talcum powder bed bug traps under each bed post, but I tested the bugs with this trap and witnessed them climb out of the talcum powder, up the talcum coated walls and out to freedom. A couple even escaped our taller CO2 traps with talc coating the walls of a tall glass. What made the CO2 traps more effective is that most of the mites would be asphyxiated before they managed to climb out of the trap.
    3) We wrapped the bed posts with the slick side of the scotch tape facing out. This was completely ineffective, as I tested the mites and watched them climb a completely smooth scotch tape, plastic or glass surface, unhindered.
    4) We wrapped many of our personal belongings thinking they would lay eggs or take up residence in them. This was completely unnecessary, as the mite infestation was self-limiting.

    TAKE-AWAY MESSAGES:
    1) Do not lose hope. Bird and rat mite infestations are usually self-limiting, and will eventually end as long as the source of the infestation (rats, birds) are identified and removed. They did not become human parasites like scabies
    2) If it is feasible to move out of the infested location for a few months, this may be the best option.
    3) The mites are extremely small, relatively fast-moving and some people will have difficulty seeing them at all. Their bites feel like tiny "pin-pricks." Using CO2 bedbug traps ("Williams Method") can be effective at catching the mites and assessing the scope of the infestation.
    4) If you have children, try to avoid using toxic pesticides or other materials such as diatomaceous earth which can be hazardous to your health. I considered using bug spray on the exterior of the skylight, but in the end it wasn't needed.
    5) Just like with anything else, do not believe everything you read on the internet. Make sure you find reputable sources, especially scientific articles on the topic.
    6) Scientific names of some rat and bird mite species: Ornithonyssus bacoti, Ornithonyssus bursa, Ornithonyssus sylviarum, Dermanyssus gallinae

    If you have any questions, please feel free to post replies. I will check back on occasion and try to answer them to the best of my abilities. Good luck and have faith.

  2. bird_mite_survivor

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    Posted 7 months ago
    Mon Feb 18 2019 3:00:52
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    TREATMENT/SOLUTION:
    Once the mites and their apparent source were identified, I got on the roof to check for dead birds or rats, of which I found none. However, I did find a lot of leaf litter around the skylight and some rat droppings. I had the roof blown clean and had all of the shrubbery and trees trimmed far back from the roof line to reduce the likelihood that rats could make their way up there. I didn't identify any bird nests, which are another potential source. Since there is no attic space above the kitchen, this also could be ruled out.

    In hindsight, I would have temporarily moved my family into an apartment or another home for a few months until the infestation cleared on its own. However, at that point I was still under the impression that the mites would follow us wherever we went. This seemed to be confirmed by the fact that other family and acquaintances were being bitten by hitchhiking mites that I was taking to other locations on my clothing. The family suffered much mental anguish as we tried to isolate the young children and capture/kill as many of the mites as possible. We were up all night on many occasions steaming, bagging and laundering most of our belongings. The experience was a complete nightmare, mostly because the mites are so impossibly small and difficult to see or kill. They also move relatively fast for their size. This was the only time in my life where I've suffered from depression, but had I known the infestation was self-limiting, this would not have been the case. Our infestation lasted 3-4 months. It may have lasted a little longer had we not been proactive in reducing their numbers, but eventually they all died on their own.

    Here are some of the most effective methods of reducing and monitoring their numbers:
    1) We made CO2 traps (designed for bed bugs) using yeast to create CO2 which is piped into a cup with unscented talcum powder at the bottom and up the walls. We followed instructions on YouTube for CO2 bedbug traps using the "Williams Method." We placed multiple traps throughout the kitchen and in one bedroom. While these traps were somewhat effective at reducing their numbers, they were more of a monitor of how extensive the infestation was at any given time.
    2) We purchased an expensive steam cleaner to steam the area around the skylight and the kitchen floor. We also used it on some of the carpet in a nearby room. We were cautious not to over-saturate any areas with moisture so as to avoid issues with mold developing.
    3) We frequently laundered, dried and bagged all of our clean clothes in large clear garbage bags or extra large zip lock bags so we could reduce our chance of being bitten or carrying the bugs out of the house.

    Some things we did that were minimally effective, or not effective at all:
    1) We used double-stick duct tape to create a border around the kitchen floor to prevent the bugs from migrating to other rooms once they fell from the skylight. While this may have reduced their numbers in the other rooms, I personally tested the bugs and witnessed them walk, albeit at a much slower pace, across the sticky double-stick duct tape!
    2) We placed the disk shaped talcum powder bed bug traps under each bed post, but I tested the bugs with this trap and witnessed them climb out of the talcum powder, up the talcum coated walls and out to freedom. A couple even escaped our taller CO2 traps with talc coating the walls of a tall glass. What made the CO2 traps more effective is that most of the mites would be asphyxiated before they managed to climb out of the trap.
    3) We wrapped the bed posts with the slick side of the scotch tape facing out. This was completely ineffective, as I tested the mites and watched them climb a completely smooth scotch tape, plastic or glass surface, unhindered.
    4) We wrapped many of our personal belongings thinking they would lay eggs or take up residence in them. This was completely unnecessary, as the mite infestation was self-limiting.

    TAKE-AWAY MESSAGES:
    1) Do not lose hope. Bird and rat mite infestations are usually self-limiting, and will eventually end as long as the source of the infestation (rats, birds) are identified and removed. They did not become human parasites like scabies
    2) If it is feasible to move out of the infested location for a few months, this may be the best option.
    3) The mites are extremely small, relatively fast-moving and some people will have difficulty seeing them at all. Their bites feel like tiny "pin-pricks." Using CO2 bedbug traps ("Williams Method") can be effective at catching the mites and assessing the scope of the infestation.
    4) If you have children, try to avoid using toxic pesticides or other materials such as diatomaceous earth which can be hazardous to your health. I considered using bug spray on the exterior of the skylight, but in the end it wasn't needed.
    5) Just like with anything else, do not believe everything you read on the internet. Make sure you find reputable sources, especially scientific articles on the topic.
    6) Scientific names of some rat and bird mite species: Ornithonyssus bacoti, Ornithonyssus bursa, Ornithonyssus sylviarum, Dermanyssus gallinae

    If you have any questions, please feel free to post replies. I will check back on occasion and try to answer them to the best of my abilities. Good luck and have faith.

    Survivor of a mite infestation.
    B.S. Biology & Entomology
  3. loubugs

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    Posted 7 months ago
    Mon Feb 18 2019 7:53:09
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    Thanks for the posting. As it turns out, sticky surfaces aren't so sticky after all. If there's not much weight to the arthropods, they don't necessarily get stuck on certain tapes. Sometimes glue in glue boards work better. I receive many calls after people read the bird mite websites. Adult mites are bigger and more visible than nymphs. The adult stage is also much more useful for species identification. Dermanyssus is clearly distinct from Ornithonyssus; O. species require good magnification and often slide mounted specimens for species determinations. Scabies mites have a different life style and live under a few layers of epidermis while the species mentioned in your post are surface feeders pushing stylets in for taking blood.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  4. bird_mite_survivor

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    Posted 7 months ago
    Mon Feb 18 2019 15:02:50
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    Thank you loubugs. Yes, I recall barely seeing the nymphs walking around the table as well. They were so tiny and light in color that they looked like pieces of dust walking around. It was an unbelievable experience that I wouldn't wish on anyone. Thank you for offering your expertise on this forum for those in desperate need.

  5. loubugs

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    Posted 7 months ago
    Mon Feb 18 2019 16:15:35
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    loubugs: Scabies mites have a different life style and live under a few layers of epidermis while the species mentioned in your post are surface feeders pushing stylets in for taking blood.

    ---I just wanted to clarify that the stylets are not like those in bed bugs, but are actually elongate chelicerae. So a very different morphology in mites compared to bed bugs.

  6. Leila

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    Posted 7 months ago
    Mon Feb 18 2019 23:32:47
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    Thanks for posting. I saw those horror stories on birdmite site and thought its crazy too.
    Anyhows. One question did you have blood stains in your bed? Little pinprick ones and bigger ones? Always considering 5 differnet dogs that alerted on bedbugs could be wrong.
    And as i only squished one with blood inisde. And saw only one other bedbug in 9 months. Will allways be open to possibility that we also have something else.
    One of the pco came here treated birdmites also and said the bites dont look the same.
    Anyhow grate to know you can actually see them.
    And how big they are.
    Got rid of all birdnests and trees touching house. as rentokill suggested it was a good idea to do that too. There only one tree left a italien ceder touching house /upper room.
    If i get more bites then once every 3 days will consider your trap.
    Did you ever have bites 2/3/4 in rows or zizag mostly in face / neck area. That looked like moscito welts? Where were your bites?
    Pco said they were different because small pin prick bites not welts ...
    can you tell us how bites looked and where they were ? Thank you

  7. bird_mite_survivor

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    Posted 7 months ago
    Tue Feb 19 2019 2:21:55
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    We didn't find any blood or fecal stains on the bed. The mites were incredibly difficult to see. You really need magnification to make out any detail... otherwise they just look like moving dots that are less than or equal to the size of a period in this sentence. The bites looked more like flea bites and did not welt as much as a mosquito bite. They were extremely itchy, though, and there was no pattern to them. The mites would bite us all over the place at random. We would have bites on our face, neck, trunk, extremities and anywhere else they happened to be.

  8. bird_mite_survivor

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    Posted 7 months ago
    Tue Feb 19 2019 2:28:07
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    The other important thing to note that differentiates mites from bed bugs, is that the mites would bite us throughout the day. I was even bitten by hitchhiking mites while I was outside of the infested house. I could often feel the moment they would bite me as a distinctive "pin prick."

  9. Leila

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    Posted 7 months ago
    Wed Feb 20 2019 1:41:12
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    Thank you for the valuable information. Bb pco who treated those to said rhe same

  10. miteneedhelp

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    Posted 6 months ago
    Fri Feb 22 2019 11:47:17
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    I PMed you with a question.

  11. Worrybug

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    Posted 6 months ago
    Fri Feb 22 2019 21:54:08
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    I find this thread sooo interesting. After an odd rash on my son, suspected as possibly insect related, I went full on bed bug crazy. Inspecting, etc. I put encasements on all the mattresses and interceptors on the bed. A few weeks in (back in November) we caught 1 mite, identified in here by Lou. Likely a bird mite. It was red, an adult. Very small. I've not caught anything since and am 4 months of having interceptors and searching like a maniac.

    Skin reactions have continued here and there but it's not clear if they are even insect bites. This experience and the wondering has been so exhausting, anxiety causing and depressing.

    Is it possible there would only be one random mite in my house. I have a dog and live in a rural setting so lots of opportunities of pests to get in.

  12. bird_mite_survivor

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    Posted 6 months ago
    Mon Feb 25 2019 1:58:40
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    Worrybug- This sounds a lot like how our infestation started. It was slow at first... only occasionally affecting one member of the household. I also spoke with my spouse regarding the timeline, and it turns out that our infestation from the very beginning to zero bites was around 5 months long. I highly doubt that a single mite can be causing all of the "bites" you are describing. If you are still getting bitten, and they are bird or rodent mites, there must be a source.

    Traditional bed bug interceptors are not very effective for rodent/bird mites. I put tons of the bed post interceptors and sticky traps out during our infestation and caught zero mites in them. The moment I started using CO2 trap/monitors, I started catching them by the dozens. This was the ONLY trap that worked for us. Please search out the "Williams Method" bed bug trap on YouTube. We made a variation of his trap using a tall mug with vertical sides. We coated placed unscented talcum powder at the bottom of the mug and coated the inside walls as well. I suggest using a metal wire to support/stiffen the plastic tubing and prevent it from touching the bottom or sides of the mug so that the mites don't use it as an escape route. One of the reasons this trap is so effective, is that the mites are eventually asphyxiated by the CO2. Without the CO2, I have seen mites crawl their way all the way out of the trap. Like I mentioned before, I experimented with them and found that they can crawl across double-stick duct tape and escape from the edges of most sticky traps.

  13. Worrybug

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    Posted 6 months ago
    Mon Feb 25 2019 8:21:51
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    Thank you for the tips. I'm about 6 months into this paranoia. Our carpet was removed 3 months ago as we did discover a carpet beetle issue and had wanted to replace it anyway. I've also been vacuuming and steaming the floors like crazy for months.

    Question, you said the mites are self limiting and went away on thier own without a suitable food source. It sounds like you suggest the issue would have resolved on it's own. Can you clarify? Or do you feel it was a combination of this fact and your own efforts to remove them.

  14. Worrybug

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    Mon Feb 25 2019 8:21:52
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    Thank you for the tips. I'm about 6 months into this paranoia. Our carpet was removed 3 months ago as we did discover a carpet beetle issue and had wanted to replace it anyway. I've also been vacuuming and steaming the floors like crazy for months.

    Question, you said the mites are self limiting and went away on thier own without a suitable food source. It sounds like you suggest the issue would have resolved on it's own. Can you clarify? Or do you feel it was a combination of this fact and your own efforts to remove them.

  15. bird_mite_survivor

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    Posted 6 months ago
    Mon Feb 25 2019 13:35:09
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    Worrybug- According to numerous professionals and scientific articles, the mites we had would not be able to continue reproduction without a suitable host (bird or rat). I'm making the assumption that my thorough search and cleaning of the roof, eves, trees and attic spaces excluded and eliminated any potential host animals. Therefore, the infestation should have come to an end regardless of our actions. I don't doubt that the measures we took hastened their demise, though. Honestly, had the mites been able to reproduce on humans, our efforts would have be vastly inadequate.

  16. desperado

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    Posted 2 months ago
    Sat Jul 6 2019 19:22:58
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    Dear Bird_mite_survivor,
    I’ve been dealing with this rat or bird mite issue for over 1 year now. I moved and they followed me and are now infesting the new house! They obviously are not coming in from the outside/source other than me. They apparently hitched a ride on my clothes/belongings. How do you suggest I eradicate them? I’ve spent so much money already on exterminators, hotels (staying away from my house), and lost so much -left my job, moved, I’m desperate more than 1 year later, please HELP!

    Will the CO2 traps work to kill them all? Do I buy another expensive thing (steamer) now that I’m jobless? I need your advice as this has not ended.

    Thanks,
    Desperado

  17. KillerQueen

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    Posted 2 months ago
    Sat Jul 6 2019 23:35:31
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    desperado - 4 hours ago  » 
    Dear Bird_mite_survivor,
    I’ve been dealing with this rat or bird mite issue for over 1 year now. I moved and they followed me and are now infesting the new house! They obviously are not coming in from the outside/source other than me. They apparently hitched a ride on my clothes/belongings. How do you suggest I eradicate them? I’ve spent so much money already on exterminators, hotels (staying away from my house), and lost so much -left my job, moved, I’m desperate more than 1 year later, please HELP!
    Will the CO2 traps work to kill them all? Do I buy another expensive thing (steamer) now that I’m jobless? I need your advice as this has not ended.
    Thanks,
    Desperado

    Doesn't sound like you have a mite problem. They can't complete their life cycle on humans so you're probably not dealing with a mite issue. Have you ever had a specimen sample ID'ed by a pro?

  18. desperado

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    Posted 2 months ago
    Tue Jul 9 2019 9:55:28
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    They were positively identified by Orkin as mites. I came to this forum because bird_mite_survivor seems to be the only person with a solution and since he’s an entomologist, I trust his methods.

  19. bird_mite_survivor

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Fri Aug 2 2019 1:27:06
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    Desperado,

    I'm sorry to hear about your situation. I'd agree that the most important first step would be to have the mites identified down to species to see exactly what you're dealing with. I'd suggest capturing specimens using the CO2 trap like we did. You may be able to find a university entomology department that would accept them... preferably one with an acarologist on staff. Is it possible you are dealing with scabies mites (Sarcoptes scabiei)? Were you bitten a lot when you stayed at hotels or other places? I remember taking a 1 week vacation (for a friend's wedding) in the midst of our infestation and during that time I was not bitten at all. Granted, I dried all of my clothes on high heat and isolated the suitcase in a plastic garbage bag prior to departing. I don't think the CO2 traps would have eradicated all of the mites unless we vacated the home and kept replenishing a large number of traps over a 1+ month period. Even then, I'm not sure if it would have done the job. The traps made good monitors to see what their population was like at any given time. When carefully constructed, they were effective at killing quite a few individuals. Over the several month period, I would guess they killed between several hundred to 1000 mites. I estimate that the infestation was in the thousands of individuals... possibly 10,000 or maybe even more. While it wouldn't hurt to have a steam cleaner, without knowing where they are coming from (in our case the skylight) I don't think it would be very effective at targeting their populations. You need to try to focus on determining the source of the infestation, and determining the species could give you important clues. I hope this helps.

  20. loubugs

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Fri Aug 2 2019 5:13:29
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    desperado - 3 weeks ago  » 
    They were positively identified by Orkin as mites. I came to this forum because bird_mite_survivor seems to be the only person with a solution and since he’s an entomologist, I trust his methods.

    Did Orkin just ID as mites or as parasitic mites such as rodent or bird mites?

  21. Argh_bugs

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Sat Aug 17 2019 10:47:37
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    We have had the summer of bugs here at our house. I think we had 4-5 different infestations in our home and three cars at the same time making identification and treatment very challenging. 1) Fleas (probably from a picnic at a rural house with dogs) 2) Scabies (probably from our college-aged daughter sharing clothes with a friend who works at a daycare) 3) Bed bugs (probably from two different Southern colleges and/or two NY bus trips and/or hotels) 4) Bird mites (probably from debris falling in from the four skylights that were replaced during our getting a new roof).

    We found that multiple courses of vacuuming, steaming, and spraying pesticide (Ortho and Harris) were most effective.

    We also washed used bedding and clothes daily. We did NOT find that either hot water or extended drying (up to 60 minutes) was effective against bugs - but it did shrink and ruin all of our clothes!

    What has been effective is washing with 20 Mule Team Borax and drying as regular (or maybe adding an extra 15 minutes if I have time or if I know that the item might have bugs). Bleach works with whites.

  22. Argh_bugs

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Sat Aug 17 2019 10:49:36
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    P.S. The Harris sprayer is difficult to use and makes a huge mess.


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