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Bedbugs in Low Income Housing

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  1. stuffedanimal

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue May 20 2014 10:50:44
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    Is there anybody else here who lives in Kansas City, Missouri? There is a bad bedbug problem in the low income housing projects and the homeless shelters, which feed into each other. The Section 8 (low income) apartment managers don't want to exterminate. They send people in to inspect your apartment, and they look for a roach or rat-type infestation. They don't understand that bedbugs aren't usually visible, and they don't know what to look for. So they don't see anything, and they refuse to exterminate, despite numerous bite scars on your body. They tell you (and this happened to me) to go visit a dermatologist.

  2. BigDummy

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue May 20 2014 11:04:46
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    Some section 8 housing is held to higher standards than regular rentals. In Florida the state programs that fund the housing do inspections on the properties and make sure that conditions are kept up. I would check your state's tenant's rights and see how you're covered.
    Be sure and keep samples of the bed bugs so that they can be properly identified.

  3. stuffedanimal

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue May 20 2014 11:14:52
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    I've seen one adult bedbug in my apartment. It moved so fast, I couldn't possibly have caught it. I suppose I could scrape together some eggs (or what I think are eggs), but you can't believe the ignorance: My manager wouldn't know what I was showing her. In Kansas City, it seems they know nothing from bedbugs.

    However, bedbugs are explicitly addressed in my rental contract. It says that management is responsible for treatment. The contract also implies that I can be compelled to trash my belongings if a bedbug infestation is found. It also recommends vacuuming with flea powder, which tells me that they don't know much about handling this pest.

  4. BigDummy

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Tue May 20 2014 12:36:58
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    Nymphs are hard to catch but I've never had problems catching a mature bed bug. The sample would be for a PCO to confirm, not for your manager. You need to be able to back up your claim with evidence if they're unwilling to do anything helpful at this point.

    I'm not one to believe in the validity of something just because it's in a contract. If it's unreasonable than it can't really be enforced; there are plenty of pros who will confirm that throwing your possessions away is not necessary, and in some cases may spread the infestation.
    I wouldn't go by your rental contract, I'd check and see what your rights are as governed by the state.

    I could put in a clause about claiming your firstborn in a lease contract, and if you're anything like my you'd just skip to the bottom line and sign without checking every sentence. Doesn't exactly make it enforceable just because its a signed document.

  5. cilecto

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed May 21 2014 7:09:16
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    As BD noted, adult bed bugs tend not to run fast. I'd have to guess that bed bug control in professionally managed complexes is as good as the management. If you suspect bed bugs in your home, you can help make your case by looking for not only bugs (in the right place), but the evidence they leave behind; fecal traces. From experience on the board, eggs and shells are hard to spot and easy to mis-identify. Gather physical or photo evidence of what you find. You can post pictures to the forum and we can usually confirm what it is. You can learn more about how/where to look for bed bugs by reading a good guide from our Resources page, like this one. Best of luck.

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  6. heebeejeebeez

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed May 21 2014 8:57:23
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    I live in a HUD multi-unit family dwelling under Section 8 that for the last year has had an active bed bug infestation.

    Last year it came to light that 2 apartments in the building, which has over 50 apartments in total, were infested with bedbugs. One unit had possibly been infested for 6 months prior to this, but the resident was afraid to say anything about it. Management had told the people who lived in them not to tell anyone else in the building, but one of the residents let the bug out of the bag, so to speak.

    When it became known there was an active infestation in the building the Administrator was posed with the questions of what they planned to do about it. If they were going to follow HUD recommendations about doing the effected units in a cloverleaf manner (the apartment on each side, above, below, and across). What they planned to do to keep the infestation from spreading throughout the building, and why they hadn't told the other tenants about the infestation.

    To say this did not go over well would be an understatement. Admin sent out a directive stating they knew what they were doing, that all these questions weren't helping, and, in so many words, to be quiet and let them do their jobs.

    That was over a year ago and they're still treating apartments to try to get control of the infestation at approximately $2500 a pop. They have had a local exterminator in to treat affected apartments but the original 2 apartments have spread to as many as 8, with some needing to be heat treated more than once. I assume they didn't want to do the original 2 apartments in a cloverleaf manner in an effort to save money and can only speculate how much money they might have saved in the long run by doing so.

    They have inspected all apartments on occasion and one bed bug was found on the frame of my bed last summer, which they sprayed down with a chemical that did kill it. I immediately washed all my bedding and clothes (which I now keep sealed in plastic totes), showered upon returning, put on clean clothes, and the ones I had on into tied trash bags for my next trip to the laundromat.

    I periodically spray down the mattress with a product that is supposed to be non-toxic and do my own inspections. I haven't seen any since, or any signs of my apartment being infested, but I don't know how many cans of Raid Bud Bug spray I've purchased in the last year to spray in the entrance of my apartment and treat other possibly effected areas.

    The exterminator laughed and said that won't kill them. Well, when you live in a building with an active infestation I feel like I need to at least do what I can to try to keep them out, and after a year of them working to clear the building, they aren't doing such a bang-up job either IMO.

    I'd move if I could afford it but nothing is to say the next place I moved wouldn't be infested and the landlord not take as much action as the people who run this building have, to their credit. I isolate myself from the rest of the people in the building and only leave my apartment to check my mail and go to my car. They've started to ask people who have had to have their apartments done more than once to move, but the same people sit in the lobby of the building every day, even while their apartments are being heat treated, so I'm dubious they'll ever get rid of them totally.

  7. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed May 21 2014 9:27:11
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    Hi,

    I had a long chat with a US professional yesterday about HUD housing and how band aiding solutions were not the answer. One of my main clients is the largest UK HUD in London with over 27,500 properties spread throughout the city.

    The huge difference in approaches is that they do not ask us to follow the central policy for bedbugs they engage us to provide the solution for each case and to advise them on best policies. As such we do not have a HUD protocol but draw from the various different tools available to get effective control.

    It is our job to tell them when a building needs screening due to dispersal and on what projects it is better to go ProActive and monitor in advance of the introduction of bedbugs because of either heavy undetected infestations or due to excessive "local source" introductions apparent because there is a higher than average level of bedbug activity.

    To put this into perspective the company that do the general pest control have 30 technicians working on the account and we have 3 people available to them. The other company used to do the bedbug work but when they realised about 5 years ago that this was specialist work and that the central policies were extremely out of date they stared working in partnership with us.

    The crazy thing is that some of the cases that caused them to make this change had already cost them in excess of $50,000 and it was not just the one cases. In some situations we treat and have the occupants follow a clear and simple workbook to deal with the infestation while in other cases (such as bedbug hoarders) we literally clear the whole property and decontaminate the assets and possessions off site to streamline the job. Such cases are costly as they are extremely labor intensive but its cheaper than band aiding.

    However one of the key aspects with social housing is helping people to understand that bedbugs don't fly in through the window and while we are amazing at getting rid of them only the occupants can assist with not bringing more of them into the location. If you fail to address this side of things you fail to treat correctly in my mind.

    The end of the conversation was when we both agreed that the best way to deal with bedbugs in HUD was to through out the existing rule book and to look at a $30 per bed and $30 per sofa strategy as an annual cost and provide the standard treatments for free alongside a program of tenant education and co-operation.

    Even if that cost was passed on to the occupants it would in reality be a lot cheaper than what you have most likley spent on cans of things that only work when sprayed directly at a bedbug and in which case you will get an equal result with hair spray, alcohol or a detergent solution.

    The amazing thing is that once correctly implemented most bedbug problems can be resolved by a single technician on the back of a scooter with a box or back pack of tools and yes I do mean that the problem is resolved by the time they leave site on that first visit.

    We can all agree that people don't want to have bedbugs. If people just learned to be professional to bring all parties together with that common goal and to create solutions that work there would be less of a spread of bedbugs.

    Sadly I have already made so many offers to work with academics on HUD solutions that I am reluctant to waste my voice again as even the ones to claim to have HUD as their priority fail to reply to the email offering support.

    I am not sure what else I can do other than to say if you are in HUD by all means suggest they email me if they want to create a solution that works.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  8. heebeejeebeez

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed May 21 2014 10:28:37
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    Hi David,

    I realize that getting rid of an infestation takes co-operation from everyone involved. The problem is, incredible as it sounds, some people don't seem to care or aren't willing to do what it takes on their part to get rid of them.

    The exterminator company that has been treating the building has a contract to spray for roaches on a monthly basis. They did give a seminar on bed bugs but IMO were in the pocket of Administration and tried to downplay the problem, making it seem like the possibility of them spreading throughout the building was remote.

    When I queried the speaker about the likelihood of them traveling through the wall from one electric outlet to another when they started to heat treat the apartment, he replied "What's the odds of that happening?" Well, what were the odds of them still treating the problem over 1 year later?

    I actually overheard one tenant at that meeting make a comment indicating that she wasn't that worried about it. People who were having their apartments treated were asked to quarantine themselves, but didn't seem willing or able to stay in their apartments, sitting in the lobby for hours or visiting other people in their apartments and possibly spreading them as they did.

    My family is scared to death of their home becoming infested and I can understand why. Therefore, I don't go there for holidays and haven't been there since the infestation became known. Other people in the building are aware of this and think they're overreacting, that it isn't that big a deal and you can get bed bugs from anywhere.

    Maintenance isn't so aloof (ignorant) and have brought clothes to work with them so they can shower and change before they go home for the night.

    It's been a year long nightmare and the only good part about it is that my apartment hasn't become infested to the point I've seen others on TV. I do care if I have them and am doing everything within my power to prevent it from getting any worse.

    Sadly, I don't believe being able to refer them to you for advise or assistance is among them.

  9. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed May 21 2014 10:51:57
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    Hi heebeejeebeez,

    Hmm, lack of co-operation, is that like the bedbug sources that we eventually had to gain forcible access to in order to deal with the problem using extreme measures and then stayed on top of the case once a week till it was resolved, yeah, as I said 27,500 properties does mean the full spectrum of responses to bedbugs from the reluctant to do anything about their 6 year infestation through to the "think I have seen one".

    This is again why developing a protocol approach to an issue where you have to sometimes create bespoke solutions is aiming to fail from the start.

    I was not present so cant comment on downplaying but I do know from what you have said they failed to create a solution which is a partnership between the three sides of the equation.

    With regards the issue of the heating. The answer is simple, if the correct heat is used (i.e. convective) the bedbugs will run towards the heat only turning after they have passed the point of no return. If the incorrect heating is used (conductive) then the risk of dispersal is a factor of the extent of the infestation with the heavier cases being more likley to disperse.

    Yes failure to contain and not disperse can be a factor in a large project which is why such jobs take more planning than anything else. In some of the most extreme cases where someone has been feeding a colony for 3+ years we actually request co-ordination with their GP and medical team because the sudden shock from not having support yourself and 50,000+ six legged friends needs to be factored in.

    Now with regards your family and the risk of them being infested it is zero until some time as you have an issue yourself and again the risk only builds as your infestation does. A small infestation will not hitchhike unless the infested item is moved. Even if after that you are still worried please immediately read the FAQ on how not to spread bedbugs to others and reconnect with your family as soon as you can. Its important for moral support if nothing else.

    If as well as reading that FAQ you read some of the others and the useful tools section you will see a lot of the information I advocate as a ProActive strategy. Your home is not in essence all that different to a hotel room, in that its a location with a high risk of bedbugs either because of the building or the people staying there. As such the steps you take in advance of bedbugs getting into the location in terms of optimisation and monitoring can make the difference between you dealing with the problem in 30 minutes or you having weeks and weeks of treatment.

    Now to leave on a high point if you can work with your adjoining and close neighbours to all get on board with the same program and in turn they spread the word through to theirs you are doing something very powerful at a grass roots level to reduce that risk.

    It may take a while for the building management and possibly longer for the PCO to see the logic and value in what you are doing but it will give you the results and protection you need to get your life back to "normal" again.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

  10. heebeejeebeez

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed May 21 2014 11:19:15
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    Thanks for the reassuring words, David.

    I haven't had the opportunity to read through all the FAQ but will do so ASAP. I've ran out of the stuff I was spraying on my mattress, Fabriclear, but the "pleasant citrus smell" was so strong I slept in the recliner for several days after using it. I haven't seen any signs of a bed bug since last summer, so it's all good, but they treated another apartment this month.

    My family is OCD about it. They're afraid of having to have their house tented for several thousand dollars and everything it involves. I can't blame them. I'd go ballistic if after a year I had to have my apartment heat treated as I've played a major part in pushing to get the problem eradicated, much to my own detriment.

  11. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed May 21 2014 11:34:21
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    Hi,

    Yeah, good understanding always starts with the FAQs.

    What you have been doing is using a contact killer with the hope that it has a residual effect. Nothing bad about doing it other than if you expect it to do any good.

    The good news is you can share the FAQ with your family and also to explain what you have now learned about bedbugs to ensure that they can also take the steps to avoid needing to tent the home and all that goes with that. Hopefully then they can help others to understand the risks and sensible steps.

    Questions are always good to ask because it helps people to frame things to their situation but the real gold around here is the condensed information that has built up over the year in the form of the FAQs.

    I have a gut feeling that armed with all this new knowledge you will be able to start steering things in your location towards a more logical solution and as I said before if they are willing to listen I will make some time available to chat with them.

    David

  12. heebeejeebeez

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed May 21 2014 19:56:35
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    bed-bugscouk - 7 hours ago  » 
    What you have been doing is using a contact killer with the hope that it has a residual effect. Nothing bad about doing it other than if you expect it to do any good.

    TBH, yes, I have been hoping for some residual/preventive effect.

    The company that is doing the heat treatment has a tow-behind trailer to provide the heat source and twice they're ran the heat hose up the side of the building, right beside my window, to the apartment a couple floors above me. I have reason to believe they recently treated one of the common areas, and the infestation is spreading further through the building, as I observed them hauling in what looked like an upright portable heating unit into the downstairs area.

    This is when I go into combat mode in a effort to keep them from migrating into my apartment and have laid countless lines of spray across my doorway, around the floor molding, electric outlets, etc. It may well have been a fruitless effort but felt like I have to do something.

    I vacuum regularly, keep my bedding washed, and do frequent inspections of my bed so I'm trying to do everything possible within reason. I did order some food grade DE and an applicator tonight, so while I've been, if nothing else, lucky enough to keep them out, this may have more potential to kill them if they do find their way in.

  13. stuffedanimal

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu May 22 2014 11:10:35
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    Heebeejeebeez,

    This sounds so similar to my situation. People in other units are constantly throwing out bedding, beds, furniture, etc. Only to my knowledge, there has been no extermination done specifically for bedbugs.

    What's been said here about adult bedbugs moving slow . . . that doesn't jibe with the research I've done. They are reputed to be fast-moving critters, and the one I believe I saw was very fast. I was trying to catch it so I could show the management, but it leapt out of sight before I could hardly blink an eye.

    There are dark stains on my bedding that I can't explain. What I see on my bed are tiny white specks that disappear when I wash my bed in the morning. By nighttime, they are back in my bed. I also see a pasty white film that periodically embeds itself into the fabric of my cot. If I spray it with alcohol or ammonia, it turns into little white squiggles and spreads in one direction or another. It's just weird. When I sit at my desk, I feel something (I can't see it), leaping at my legs and stinging me. I also feel stings on my bottom. Occasionally, something will bite my hand and the pain and itching won't stop until a sizable vertical scar has appeared. It's frightening to see these scars just appear, seemingly out of nowhere. I have them on my hands and my legs. I've also had them on my face.

    I work in a public library, and am exposed to bedbugs, scabies, etcetera, every day. There is constant need for cleaning and disinfecting (what gets done is far from adequate), but the administration doesn't care. I've told them about the problem, and all I got was a hostile response. It was implied that I could be replaced very easily! But at any rate, I'm exposed at home and at work. I can't get away from the pain and the itching!

  14. stuffedanimal

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu May 22 2014 12:45:47
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    There is a lot of conflicting information out there about bedbugs ("they love heat"/"they can't stand heat"/"you can kill them by freezing"/"Freezing can't hurt them"/"Mattress protectors can/can't stop them"), as well as some outright lies ("men can't feel bedbug bites, but women can")! What my research has taught me: Unless it's applied by a professional, bedbug pesticides are a waste of time and money. Also, over time the bugs tend to become resistant to all pesticide sprays used against them. If there's going to be a solution to the bedbug problem, it will need to come in the form of a low-cost powder that can be spread around. Quiet as its kept, many of us cannot afford Packtites, dry heating devices and the like. Yes, incomes can sometimes be that meager! This is why food pantries and homeless shelters exist (which, BTW, are often infested with bedbugs).

  15. heebeejeebeez

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu May 22 2014 15:38:45
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    stuffedanimal - 2 hours ago  » 
    If there's going to be a solution to the bedbug problem, it will need to come in the form of a low-cost powder that can be spread around. Quiet as its kept, many of us cannot afford Packtites, dry heating devices and the like.

    Hi,

    I got a 2lb pack of SafeDe food grade DE and a Pest Pistol applicator on ebay for approx $26 total last night. The applicator has already been shipped and I expect the DE to soon follow. I was buying a can of Raid Bud Bug spray every other month at $9 a pop, and probably for naught, so this seemed like a good deal to me.

    I made my own interceptors out of a couple different sized plastic containers for each leg of the bed, the outer one filled with mineral oil, but have never seen one in them. I've never seen any signs of blood spotting on the bed so that's something.

    The exterminator left glue traps that could be folded up into the shape of a box. I set one up in the space between my box springs and headboard last night but nothing got stuck. I have double sided tape on the legs of my bedroom chair but have never seen anything on them either.

    My LL is at least trying to get control of the situation, but what could probably have been treated successfully early on has dragged out over a year now due to the way it's been handled.

    Good luck.

  16. stuffedanimal

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu May 22 2014 17:16:11
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    I used DE dust before, but I can't see how it helped much. The infestation still spiraled out of control. If you sprinkle DE directly on their bodies, the bugs will burst; but otherwise, they seem to just stroll right through it. I just spoke to a man with roots in the Deep South, and he said his grandparents used Boric Acid to stop bedbugs. It's cheap, and worth a try, I guess. I have managed to slow down the bites over the past couple of days with Gold Bond powder. My bed is a military cot with slanted legs, so the sticking-the-legs-in-oil method won't work for me.

  17. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu May 22 2014 17:42:18
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    Hi,

    Boric acid only works on insects that can eat it or ingest it through grooming.

    Please read the FAQs for more explanation of what does and does not work.

    David

  18. P Bello

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri May 23 2014 7:31:42
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    Some clarification:

    Above is posted:

    "With regards the issue of the heating. The answer is simple, if the correct heat is used (i.e. convective) the bedbugs will run towards the heat only turning after they have passed the point of no return. If the incorrect heating is used (conductive) then the risk of dispersal is a factor of the extent of the infestation with the heavier cases being more likley to disperse."

    This comment is not 100% correct for the following reasons:

    > While some bed bugs may travel toward the heat source during a heat treatment application not all of them will. Some will, some won't and some won't move at all. While we see this occur during heat treatments at infested locations, currently there are no published studies conducted under controlled conditions regarding this phenomenon. (In fact, check out one of my published videos taken during such a heat treatment. In this video you will see: a) Bed bugs crawling toward the heat source, b) Bed bugs crawling away from the heat source and c) Bed bugs not moving at all. It is also visually apparent that the crawling bed bugs are running in just about every direction. By the way, the heat source is located to the right off camera.)

    > While convection heat is the desirable heating method, technically speaking there can be no convection heat in the absence of conduction or conductive heat transfer. This is so by definition, due to logistics and physics as well.

    > Note that dispersal is not an issue when an entire building is remediated as "a project" all at the same time. Piece meal type work can be counter productive and problematic for obvious reasons. Of course, such facilities suffer from limited resources and the massive amount of work to be done can be cost prohibitive for some locations.

    > Public housing facilities, such as "Section 8" facilities, which are partially funded by state and federal agencies, are regulated by such agencies and required to keep their properties in compliance with certain published parameters. Such facilities are usually regulated by the local Housing Authority. This Authority oversees the compliance and may also be the entity that awards contracts to service vendors such as pest professionals. However, the Authority may also be the entity that inspects property locations which are managed by other entities to assure compliance with the published regulations. These regulations include utilities, condition of habitable abodes and pest control. As such, public housing residents who are enduring less than tolerable conditions due to pests such as bed bugs should consider attaining assistance from both the local Health Department and the local Housing Authority.

    Have a great bug free day and holiday weekend ! pjb

  19. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri May 23 2014 8:32:19
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    Paul,

    My statement is based on the facts of the published research of Stephen Kells from the University of Minnesota, you might want to consider reading it.

    David

  20. heebeejeebeez

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri May 23 2014 8:39:46
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    Hi P Bello,

    The facility in which I live is exactly like a hotel with approximately 10 units on each of multiple floors. It's directly under control of the Housing Authority and I have been in contact with them, HUD, and the Health Department in regard to this matter on more than one occasion over the past year, making me not one of the more popular tenants.

    What I have observed when the PCO treat a unit is they use a box trailer which provides convective heat through a hose they run through one of the windows, blocking any cracks. Treatment begins early in the morning, takes about 8 hours, and residents usually go into another part of the building while their apartment is treated. Heat sensors are placed inside the apartment and monitored by PCO personnel with wi-fi connected laptops from the hall.

    Residents having their apartment treated are asked to wash all their clothes (which they usually do in the facility laundry room), empty out drawers into the middle of the floor, and remove anything like candles and medication that may be effected by the high heat.

    The only thing separating units is a wall which evidently isn't all that thick. Residents who are having their apartments treated either go into the lobby or another apartment to visit, and at least one unit was found to have BB after the visit. More than one unit has had to be treated more than once and more than one tenant refused to confine themselves to their own apartment after it had been found to be infested. Those people have now been asked to leave or have left. Initially, items that were thrown away by one tenant have been retrieved by another and items that weren't wanted by tenants not known to be effected laid out in the common area for other residents who wanted them, until directed not to do so to prevent spreading.

    My initial attempt to assist Management in getting control of the situation was rejected. Nobody else in the building seemed to modify their behavior when the situation became known, at this point it's not in my best interest to attempt to get them to do so, and from past experience would be to no avail if I did.

    It's to the point I don't leave my apartment except to check my mail or go to my car, and can only do what I can to try to keep my own apartment from becoming infested. I go to the laundromat to do my clothes, don't frequent the common areas, and keep moving when I have to pass through them. As previously stated, I haven't seen a BB since the one found on my bed frame last year, but it's like waiting for the hammer to drop when you know they're in the building.

  21. P Bello

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri May 23 2014 11:01:29
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    Dear heebee,

    I'm sorry you're going through this situation.

    It seems that you've already contacted the folks in the Housing Authority and you've "made some friends there" already.

    However, these are the folks that can work to eliminate the bed bug problem within your building.

    While it's likely to get worse ins some regards before it gets better, it appears that you're going to have to keep after them until such time that they implement a successful remediation program.

    Having worked with many such HAs as well at such facilities I am well familiar with the challenges therein, some of which include:

    > Limited resources.
    > Lack of suitable knowledge and training.
    > Lack of cooperation from residents.
    > Resident turnover.
    > Transient residents within t the same and neighboring complexes.
    > Individuals who work against the greater good of the entire program either purposefully or not.

    In your situation it appears that you are "up against it" with many of these factors.

    I totally appreciate the situation you are in and applaud your efforts thus far. As it may be that you are not planning on moving from this place for a period of time, you are likely best served to do what you can to avoid being bitten and keeping bed bugs "at bay" from your own unit. This can be done successfully given suitable effort and techniques. And, if you have questions I'll be happy to provide viable answers thereof. Note that isolation of your unit cannot provide 100% assurance that no bed bugs will ever find their way into your unit, given suitable methodologies you should be able to avoid a significant infestation and numerous bites from occurring.

    As for total remediation building wide, there is likely more politics at play than any other one factor. Overcoming that obstacle will take some doing but I've seen it done in the past by folks in a similar situation as yours. I know that it takes persistence and a decent plan to do so.

    Below is the link to:

    "How to Prevent Bed Bugs From Entering Your Home"

    By Dr. Stephen Kells and others at the University of MN Dept of Entomology.

    http://www.bedbugs.umn.edu/files/2012/10/how-to-prevent-bed-bugs-from-entering-your-home.pdf

    Note that there is other useful information also available on their website which is all available for free as well.

    On another subject:
    Note that I am familiar with Dr. Kells, his published work and have worked alongside him in the past at industry conferences. In fact, both Stephen and I were interviewed by the NY television news media about bed bugs together at the Rutgers Clambake conference.

    We need to be careful how we characterize certain comments or observations about bed bug behavior and avoid the implication that all or a significant portion of the wild bed bug population crawls toward the heat source during a heat application treatment or not. Simply stated, some do, others do not and there is no published study under controlled conditions which measures the percentage or portion of the wild bed bug population that does whatever during a heat treatment.

    Have a great day folks ! pjb

  22. heebeejeebeez

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri May 23 2014 12:09:15
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    Thanks to the link to the .pdf and the site. You were spot on with the challenges and politics involved.

    I might have been on the high side of the $2500 I quoted they were spending on heat treating one unit, but after having to do several throughout the building Management has taken a more active interest in trying to bring the situation under control. They have tried to educate people in what is and is not appropriate but the turnover is constant and getting people to comply has been piecemeal work at best.

    I found out the hard way about the politics involved and that I have no power whatsoever to influence anyone at any level to do anything. Trying to do so has only been to my own detriment in more ways than one. At one time I was perfectly happy living here, the apartment I have is nice and within my budget, but things have gone to Hades in a handbag since I took an active interest in the overall situation.

    My DE has already been shipped and should arrive within the next few days. I already practice the measures outlined in the .pdf and will continue to do what I can to prevent them moving into my apartment.

  23. P Bello

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri May 23 2014 12:50:44
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    Dear heebee,

    That sounds good so far.

    I can share some strategies and methodologies with you that others have found successful in dealing with the politics. However, I'm hesitant to post all that information on a public forum because it may adversely affect the efforts of others as well as your future efforts in that regard.

    Again, I'm sorry you're dealing with this situation.

    Best wishes for success and keep up the good work !

    pjb

  24. heebeejeebeez

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat May 24 2014 20:23:45
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    The Pest Pistol and DE I ordered a couple days ago arrived this morning.

    I did a thorough vacuuming of my whole apartment first, then took the bed apart and sprayed the frame down with isopropyl alcohol and changed the bedding. I used DE all around the baseboards, furniture, cracks and cervices, pulled the covers off the wall sockets and dusted inside them, etc.

    I still didn't see any signs of BB and am hoping to keep it that way.

  25. stuffedanimal

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri May 30 2014 17:55:45
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    I would appreciate people who are administrators of this forum, or who have been on it awhile, not to post messages telling people to read the FAQs. Either provide a link to the specific FAQ that you're talking about, or cut and paste it into your message. Nobody who's desperate for help likes to be told to run over here and run over there, online or in person. Too many of us have been given the runaround. Just be considerate, and realize that you may be coming across as haughty.

  26. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat May 31 2014 14:11:10
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    Hi stuffedanimal,

    Its not always possible to provide a link if you are accessing on a mobile platform. Often making sure people know the information is present and hoping that if needed someone will add a follow up link is all that is possible.

    It may be that others could help by providing some of those links when needed.

    However there are many times when starting reading and understanding from scratch is needed because understanding things from the basics up is what is needed to get an effective solution. After all non of us want to see people suffer from bedbugs for longer than is needed.

    David

  27. stuffedanimal

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Jun 18 2014 13:09:57
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    If you can't provide a link, then please don't post to this topic. As I stated before, low income people dealing with bedbug infestations are desperate. They are often given the runaround when seeking a remedy, and "go read the FAQs" without a link is quite inconsiderate. Nobody who needs a needle wants to have to go through a haystack to find it. Those FAQ postings are long and involved. Also, if you don't have patience to explain things to people who are desperate and have specific questions, then why even take part in a forum like this? Just post the FAQs and close the forum down. Directing someone to the FAQs without a link just isn't right.

  28. stuffedanimal

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Jun 18 2014 13:12:30
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    The situation in Kansas City: None of the city agencies want to take responsibility for eradicating bedbugs. So if you live in low income housing and can't afford to exterminate, you will be directed to federal agencies for help. I'm at that point now, but I won't be surprised if they refer me back to the local agencies. It's a nightmarish runaround, and the officials you contact are extremely snippy. They have the attitude: "Fool with a bedbug problem! How dare you intrude on my busy day?"

  29. BigDummy

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Jun 18 2014 13:16:02
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    I just added the FAQ for posting FAQs if anyone is interested...

  30. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Jun 18 2014 13:18:47
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    BigDummy - 1 minute ago  » 
    I just added the FAQ for posting FAQs if anyone is interested...

    LOL! . . . And that was VERY generous of you and MUCH nicer than what I was going to do!!!

  31. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Jun 18 2014 13:26:47
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    Hi,

    I am sorry you feel that it is necessary of appropriate to post in that way. I am actually in front of the computer at the second so can illustrate some of the links that I feel are worth reading.

    http://bedbugger.com/faqs/legalissues/ - who pays for pest control and legal issues

    It would certainly be a more effective way to help people to encourage them to understand the legal responsibilities and to ensure that the HUD admin are following them.

    http://bedbugger.com/faqs/pestcontrol/ - the whole section applies to most people in most situations

    Again its a lot of information but as people in a difficult situation generally appreciate understanding the problem and knowing what the options are will help people to work out their options.

    http://www.bed-bugs.co.uk/tbypmr.pdf - a link to a cost effective way for people to deal with bedbugs using basic resources provided as a 27 page protocol.

    As for your advice as to when I should and should not post I will take that into consideration but as a general rule I have always felt it is best to post something that helps people in the right direction sooner rather than later. As you may have seen from some of the other threads the more technical aspects of bedbugs and confirming signs and what to do can actually take a few conversations to build up.

    However generally the posts around here are positive in tone and I am fairly certain if I was doing something wrong or offensive it would have been pointed out by the admin of the forum.

    Regards,

    David


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