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Bedbug buzz

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  1. (deleted)

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 17:09:35
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    So, surprise, surprise, quite a number of bedbug (okay, bed bug) presentations at the Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America in San Diego this week:

    Board Certified Entomologists' Symposium: A Public Health Menace, The Resurgence and Mitigation of Cimex lectularius Linnaeus

    Molecular Insights into Bed Bug (Cimex lectularius) Biology

    New Developments in Bed Bug (Cimex sp.) Research and Control

    Bed bugs: A global resurgence of the bed bug, and challenges posed by insecticide resistance in effective bed bug management

    A lot of the researchers and scientists whose work has helped us understand our little friends--and a great many new names--and quite a lot of intriguing stuff. Awesome.

    To be a fly on the wall...

    (The thing I'm most intrigued by? Symbionts!)

  2. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 18:25:01
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    Yes!

    An entomologist and some-time commenter on the blog, is promising to report back on these. She's the friend of Bedbugger who works in public health in California.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  3. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 18:29:33
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    ps this is my favorite title:

    "Board Certified Entomologists' Symposium: A Public Health Menace, The Resurgence and Mitigation of Cimex lectularius Linnaeus"

    A PUBLIC HEALTH menace!!!

    Yo, is everyone listening?!?

  4. (deleted)

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 18:37:33
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    LOL!

    I'll see your public health menace and raise you:

    My bed bugs: From fascination to facilitation

    Bed bugs on top Down Under: Experiences from Australia

    U.S. Navy interest in bed bug resurgence

    Poor Dr. Harlan must get so many requests for bedbugs. And Stephen Doggett is speaking.

    And the Navy is interested, Nobugs.

    The Navy.

    Enough said.

  5. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 18:40:34
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    I like the Australian title. Except that it implies the bed bugs are winning.

  6. NotSoSnug

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 20:32:01
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    The 'symbiont' to BBz in the above article, a bacterium called Wolbachia, has been implicated as the human pathogen in Filariasis, which affects some 120 million persons worldwide, not the nematode it infects which was previously held responsible. "Wolbachia in the Inflammatory Pathogenesis of Human Filariasis"

    Some studies have focused on the Wolbachia as a symbiont with the worms that infect Filariasis victims and killing the bacteria kills the worms and hence ends the illness. But this paper indicates that the inflammatory filariasis is caused directly by the bacterial toxins.

    Interestingly the ubiquitous Wolbachia (infecting 20-75% of ALL insects) transmits to new individuals in insect, crustacean and worm species through inheritance and manipulates the genders of the individuals it infects for their own advantage. "Male-Targeting Bacterium's Genome is Deciphered"

    So, if some BBz are infected with Wolbachia is that bacterium the agent for the immune response so many BB sufferers experience and is there a long term health risk here? How would we know without more research?

  7. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 21:11:59
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    Great question, NotSoSnug.

  8. (deleted)

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 21:43:42
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    Oh no, and I was so happy.

    I thought the idea was that scientists could figure out ways to target the bacteria that bedbugs may depend on for vital functions, in order to mess with the bedbug, of course, and either kill it or sterilize it or otherwise mess with it (see this article, a PDF).

    That the bacteria could add to our worries is scary.

    As for the human immune response to bedbug bites, they actually know a bit more about this now and at least one responsible party, a bedbug salivary protein, nitrophorin, has been identified.

    PS: NSS, your second link is missing?

  9. NotSoSnug

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 23:25:42
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    Oops- Missing link article: Male-Targeting Bacterium's Genome is Deciphered
    http://www.tigr.org/news/pr_03_16_04.shtml

    Citation: Phylogenomics of the Reproductive Parasite Wolbachia pipientis
    http://biology.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371/journal.pbio.0020069&ct=1

  10. NotSoSnug

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 23:36:45
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    Hopelessnomo: I'm sure research will still focus on interrupting the symbiotic relationship and how that can kill or manipulate the host in ways that 'benefit us', but the ethics of infecting insects with Wolbachia ought to be re-examined if there's any doubt.

  11. NotSoSnug

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 23:45:05
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    Hopelessnomo: That paper on nitrophorin doesn't indicate if the experimenters did any control tests against infection by Wolbachia, which I would like to see to be conclusive.

  12. (deleted)

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 23:59:28
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    Hi NotSoSnug,

    Sakamoto and Rasgon described Wolbachia infections in existing natural populations of bedbugs as ubiquitous. (I don't think they even know what the Wolbachia are for yet.)

    The authors of the allergic hypersensitivity study found no antibodies for another protein, apyrase. And, indeed, I did not offer that as argument; I was just sharing. I don't claim any deep understanding of these questions. It's just that these are the studies that are actually available to us. (In other words, I'm afraid of being afraid, so don't want to worry about Wolbachia yet. There is enough to scare me otherwise in what is already known about bedbugs.)

    I appreciate the conversation.

  13. NotSoSnug

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 9 2007 0:28:29
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    Hopelessnomo: I don't have access to journals and I am untrained for rigorous debate, but I can comment that:

    a) Wolbachia is ubitquitous in insects, esp bedbugs (per your comment, no citation)

    b) that Wolbachia proteins exist in the salivary glands of other insects (notably mosquitoes and drosophila).

    c) that the nitorphorin article notes "immediate reactions to the salivary gland solution of C. lectularius"

    d) that while, the researchers noted immune response to Cimex nitrophorin, and the paper concludes that "bullous cimicosis may be the late-phase response of an allergic IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to C. lectularius nitrophorin", the presence of Wolbachia was not tested for nor confirmed and the immune response was not tested against other proteins.

    e) While there may be allergic repsonse in humans to nitrophorin, the entire scope of allergic response has not been examined regarding Wolbachia.

    PS I love this kind of conversation! I should add that I do so entirely to encourage public pressure on politicians for money to research Bedbugs as a Public Health risk, not to worry folks.

  14. (deleted)

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 9 2007 0:35:47
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    Sakamoto and Rasgon are the authors of the American Entomologist article I linked above, the PDF.

    (Also, re the proteins, I was editing my comment above probably, but they did test apyrase.)

    I can assure you that I'm only regurgitating what I read. And I don't have access to full journal articles either. And I didn't realize we were debating.

    Now I feel inadequate.

  15. NotSoSnug

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 9 2007 0:37:24
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    Oh sheesh! I'm so intimidating... It's my enthusiasm and single minded focus. As NoBugs can attest to with my Nocturnal Obsessions.

  16. (deleted)

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 9 2007 0:38:56
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    And you can sing, let's not forget that.

  17. NotSoSnug

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 9 2007 0:39:28
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    And carry a tune too!

  18. NotSoSnug

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 9 2007 0:45:15
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    cimexlectulariusticexpialidoceous,
    even tho the little bugs are something quite attrocious,
    if you hunt them long enough you'll always feel precocious,
    cimexlectulariusticexpialidoceous

  19. (deleted)

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 9 2007 0:54:16
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  20. NotSoSnug

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 9 2007 0:59:20
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    Hmm, better stop plagiarizing, don't want NoBugs to get any DMCA takedown notices. Or can it be considered satire?

  21. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Jan 6 2008 16:39:24
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    I think you're giving Weird Al a run for his money, Notsosnug.

  22. lil_bit_obsessed

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Jan 6 2008 17:55:58
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    notsosnug, HAHAHAHAHAHA!

    and that's all.


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