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Bed bugs in book, please help

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  1. Bugged at the library

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Tue Jan 1 2013 12:28:44
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    On the 23rd Dec I borrowed three books from the library, carried one up to my bed to read in the morning (put it on floor next to bed)

    Christmas Eve morning I opened the book in bed and three bed bugs ran out (caught them) i leapt off the bed and dropped the book in the empty bath to inspect it. It had at least three splatted bugs in it.

    I removed the sheets and curtain to wash in hot water and found another bug under the curtain (they drape on the floor) i vacuumed the floor and mattress and have done several times since then. I inspected the other library books (no bugs), put them all in ziplock bags and so far no bites or other spottings.

    Either I have got rid of them or there are a very tiny number of them in my bedroom. What should I do? Please advise.

  2. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Tue Jan 1 2013 12:50:55
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    Dear bugged,

    There's a bunch of questions that come to mind regarding your situation; some questions and comments for your consideration:

    > Bites - did you notice any bites?

    > Location - where are you located/what city?

    > Books - Yes, unfortunately it is possible for bed bugs to get into books, and libraires too, for various reasons. As you've demonstrated, people tend to read in bed and, if they do have bed bugs it's possible for bed bgs to get into the books "inadvertantly". Note that I state inadvertantly because imo, except for the the fact that the book may offer a suitable harborage site, texture, size, etc, for the bed bugs, we know that bed bugs would prefer, that is if they were actually capable of making a cognitive choice rather than an insinctual reaction, to hide in or near your bed.

    This said, it was great that you sealed these books in a zip lock bag and inspected them and also laundered your bedding as well.

    Due to the overall "downside risk" of bed bugs, it's wise to utilize some efforts now rather than "wait to see what happens" and possibly subject yourself to a bed bug horror story later.

    My overall concern on your behalf includes the presence of undetected eggs and other crawler stage bed bugs.

    Here's some things you can do:

    > Remain vigilant.
    > Educate yourself about bed bugs, how to inspect & what too look for. (use the Resource Tab on this site to help you)
    > Continue to inspect for signs of bed bugs. Include your mattress, box spring, bed frame and night stand as a minimum in your inspection process. Use a decent flashlight and a magnifying glass to supplement your vision if needed.

    In the meanwhile, feel free to post additional questions and concerns.

    Good luck, I hope you got them all with your quick actions and hope this helps ! paul b.

  3. endless_nightmare

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Tue Jan 1 2013 21:07:02
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    Dear Paul

    I read in another post that you recommended treating possibly infested books in a Packtite, I own a closet Packtite and before I moved last July (carrying the bugs with me not from books I think) I treated several books in my closet

    I would do 10 to 15 books at onces hang then on clothes hangers right in the middle of the book

    would I have been better off just doing one at a time?

    I'm moving again in April (dear God) I still have bed bugs, but my downstairs neiboors are absolutely crazy, it's like noise from 7am to 4am, so I'm moving this time because of the noise (had to call the cops again tonite)

    So I'd like to get this move absolutely right

    Let me know what you think

    Thank you

    Andrea
    not a PCO
    Spinal Cord Injury Advocacy/Volunteer
  4. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Tue Jan 1 2013 21:57:02
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    Dear endless,

    The greatest issue of concern is delivering the heat in an efficacious manner. As long as you can position the books such that they remain "loosely open" which will allow the heat treatment to enter and sufficiently heat all possible areas where bed bugs & eggs may be located for a sufficient duration of time to produce 100% mortality then you should be OK.

    You also want to avoid over packing the unit with so much material to heat treat that the materials/items themselves provide insulated areas where the heat cannot reach.

    Please note that I do not know for sure if this means that you can place one, ten or any number of books within your unit and still be successful.

    Remember, you always have the inexpensive option of sealing books into plastic bags as a back up plan too.

    I hope this makes sense and helps you.

    Sorry your going through the situation at your place. Certainly noisy and discourteous neighbors suckdotcom so, hope you're able to get out and to a much better place asap !

    Best regards, paul b.

  5. endless_nightmare

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Jan 2 2013 0:45:47
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    thanks for your kind response Paul

    by placing the books in a ziplock, do you mean leaving them like that for 16 months?

  6. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Jan 2 2013 0:57:17
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    If using a Packtite, I believe David James suggests placing the temperature probe in the center of a stack or row of books. If temperatures are monitored, it would seem to be possible to be confident about treating multiple items.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  7. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Jan 2 2013 8:47:47
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    Dear folks,

    There are some issues/factors worthy of consideration that come into play:

    > Basically we don't want to "turn convection heat into conduction heat". Even though we may have a convection heat system in place, at the micro-environ level, if the substrate/surface/material/item being heated is not directly being hit/contacted by the heated air via convection then it is being heated via conduction where the heat energy is being transferred to it from the warmer item adjacent to it. While not an ideal situation, it still may work given sufficient time. However, the heat driven mortality data that we know kinda-sorta "goes out the window".

    > We need to know with certainty the amount of time necessary to reach the lethal temperature within all the books in all potential harborage areas. Have the books, or any other materials placed within the unit, stacked within the unit too densely will affect the exposure/treatment time necessary.

    > We also need to consider other logistical factors, including but not limited to: a) There's no need to "try to hurry" with bed bugs. We can keep suspect books sealed in plastic bags while we treat a suitable number of books at a time in the packtite unit. b) Plastic bags, and other suitable bed bug proof containers, offer a near "fool proof" methodology that is quick, painless and cost effective (dare I say cheap?).

    Hope this helps ! paul b.

  8. endless_nightmare

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Jan 2 2013 13:48:47
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    OK oh now I get it

    the ziplocks actually would cut down on the work and I would have time to treat everything slowly and carefully

    you did loose me on the heat theory a bit there, but that's OK

    much appreciated

  9. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Jan 2 2013 15:13:42
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    Yes, you can use the bags in a number of ways:

    a) To seal suspect books in for a length of time that would assure no bed bug survival. This would take many months to be 100% sure so, this is not the most "time efficient" method but, if you don't need the books, it is the least labor intensive.

    b) To hold the books until such time that you can treat them. Doing so provides a level of convenience to you.

    c) To store books as a prevention option.

    Hope this helps ! paul b.

  10. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Jan 2 2013 15:24:45
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    @PB: Mr. Bello, if someone doesn't have a PackTite, could books also be treated with Nuvan strips in plastic bags? If yes, (1) how long is the recommended time period that it would take; and (2) would you theoretically run into the same problem with Nuvan strips and books as you potentially could with a PackTite and books . . . meaning how would you be sure the "gases" get all the way through the book due to their density? (I just want to make sure I understand what you are saying.)

  11. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Jan 2 2013 17:20:20
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    Dear abs,

    Yes, and, yes.

    I'd set the books such that they were fanned open to assure that the treatment (either heat or ddvp vapor) could effectively get into the books in an efficacious manner.

    But, that's me; just sayin.

    Hope this helps ! paul b.

  12. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Jan 2 2013 18:37:36
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    Thanks Paul Bello! (I love it when a man says yes to me, and look, you did it TWICE!! You're the best!!!)

    Seriously, good to know. Thanks!

  13. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Jan 2 2013 20:21:55
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    Well, remember, we're men, so:

    > if you talk real slow

    > don't use big words

    > ask simple questions

    and

    > questions that are easy to answer yes to . . .

    then, you can hear "Yes" virtually all the time.

    In an effort to help you out, here's examples of some "easy" questions to ask us men/husbands:

    Q: Hey, are you gonna sit in that chair and watch football all day?
    A: Yes !

    Q: Hey, are you going hunting instead of cleaning the garage this weekend?
    A: Yes !

    Q: Hey, are you bring your golf clubs on this "business trip"?
    A: Yes !

    See, it's really easy. In fact, I bet you can come up with dozens of "Yes type questions" if you put just a little bit of effort into it !

    Have a nice day ! pjb

  14. theyareoutthere

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Jan 2 2013 20:47:12
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    I've done the plastic bag thing-with a cable tie-ith books that I don't use often (in the spare room closet since I'm allergic to dust mites and was finding spiders and book lice in them). That makes sense that it would decrease your work...never thought of that.

    Another example of answering simple questions that has happened to me personally:

    Q: Did you check a map before leaving work so you aren't two hours late getting to my mother's place? (He always gets lost and never asks for help AND ignores his GPS)
    A: Yes!

    Q: You like my parents, right?
    A: Yes!

    Meanwhile, since I got off work at noon and he got off work at 6, I was sitting with my parents at 9 p.m. when he walked in. Three ?##/# hours late to my mother's place because he got lost in the "big city". He was lost right, not at a watering hole?

    Note: No read for answering rhetorical question..don't want to hijack real thread but had some examples for Mr. Bello and AF.

    They
    Are
    Out
    There
    = TAOT
  15. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Jan 3 2013 0:14:43
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    Directions?

    We don't need no stinking directions !

    : )

  16. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Jan 3 2013 0:25:01
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    I did not see anyone mention this (may have missed it) but if you found bed bugs in a book the day after getting it from a library, and you did not see other signs of bed bugs, there is a good chance the bed bugs came home with the book. You need to return it in a sealed zipper bag and tell the librarians what you found. They need to have the library professionally inspected.

  17. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Jan 3 2013 6:15:24
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    Hi,

    As bedbugs in libraries is becoming an increasingly discussed topic it may be time to get a FAQ out there.

    I would strongly suggest that it focus on the following:

    • If you find of suspect bedbugs in a library book seal the book immediately in a zip lock bag and keep any samples / ID material separate for confirmation either through posting pictures or for the library. Once isolated the offending book can not add to the issue.
    • The facts of the issue should then be reported to the library system in a clear and sensible manner without too much stress and shouting.
    • The home should then be monitored at least in the areas where the book was read to ensure there were no other rogue bedbugs about. The treatment by Passive Monitor replacement protocol would work well in such cases.
    • I do have a best practice specification for libraries which I compiled following the recent news articles but they still appear to be playing the "Ostrich bug" game.

    In terms of PackTite and books yes they are the hardest items to process due to the density and insulating properties of paper, however they can be done at a reasonable throughput if you are sensible and make sure there are appropriate safe guards in place. In our case that means extra probes and log tags to monitor and QC.

    Its not uncommon for us to process about 200 litres of books per run but the more books you do the longer the process will take, this is mainly due to the need to overcome the moisture content of the books which cause an evaporative cooling effect at the start of the run. If in doubt small volumes on long runs, if you are in a hurry then fanning the pages open such as standing the books upright with the covers open 2 or more inches will overcome this issue.

    At the end of the day its still the fastest and most reliable way to deal with bedbugs in books and possessions in general.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro

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