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Beauveria bassiana, BotaniGard, Mycotrol O

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  1. Jaffrey

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Mar 16 2013 6:44:08
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    We at BioWorks, Inc. have been getting numerous calls from homeowners, landlords and pest control operators requesting information about use of BotaniGard and Mycotrol O to control bedbugs. We feel it is necessary to communicate our stance on this issue here at Bedbugger.com:
    A recent laboratory study has shown some efficacy from Beauveria bassiana on bedbugs. BotaniGard and Mycotrol O, both containing Beauveria bassiana strain GHA, are registered with EPA for use on plants in greenhouses, other covered growing structures, and outdoors for labeled insects only. They are not registered for bedbugs. These products have not undergone the additional testing and scientific review to demonstrate the level of safety or efficacy that would allow their use inside homes. We do not support the application of BotaniGard or Mycotrol O inside homes for any purpose until appropriate “health and safety” testing is conducted and they are legally registered for use in human dwellings.
    John Francis, Technical Manager, BioWorks, Inc.

  2. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Mar 16 2013 7:16:48
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    Hi John,

    Thanks for this post and the clarification I hope it brings.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  3. theyareoutthere

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Mar 16 2013 7:20:31
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    Yes, thank you.

    They
    Are
    Out
    There
    = TAOT
  4. P Bello

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Mar 16 2013 21:46:47
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    There ya go !

  5. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Mar 17 2013 0:51:49
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    Jaffrey - 18 hours ago  » 
    We at BioWorks, Inc. have been getting numerous calls from homeowners, landlords and pest control operators requesting information about use of BotaniGard and Mycotrol O to control bedbugs. We feel it is necessary to communicate our stance on this issue here at Bedbugger.com:
    We do not support the application of BotaniGard or Mycotrol O inside homes for any purpose until appropriate “health and safety” testing is conducted and they are legally registered for use in human dwellings.

    Thanks for your post, John.

    This is also the message which has been conveyed here by the site's administration, multiple entomologists and PMPs, and most others.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  6. jimdavis

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Tue Jul 25 2017 14:56:39
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    I'm a little reluctant to ask this-- since the Bb topic has proven controversial here on this site-- for reasons I understand.

    As I understand it, 4 years later, Bb has apparently been approved for interior use ("Aprehend" recently approved by the EPA, though not actually registered for sale by state yet.)

    Does that mean the health and safety testing has in fact been conducted now, and has turned out OK?

  7. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Tue Jul 25 2017 15:38:29
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    Hi,

    From my perspective the data I have seen and the presentations I have attended mean that even if the EPA said yes it remains a no for me. To keep the spores stable and viable they have to use a petroleum distillate and while that remains the case I will always be against this product.

    There are safer ways to deal with bed bugs and frankly we need to waste less time chasing majic bullets and and put research efforts into what does help.

    David

  8. jimdavis

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Jul 26 2017 1:26:05
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    Thank you-- I appreciate your insights and experience. I'm wondering, it sounds like your main concern about its safety, is the use of petroleum distillates?

  9. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Jul 26 2017 5:55:11
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    Hi,

    As all hydrocarbons in this class are carcinogenic I feel its too significant a concern to not be the main one. There are of course others, its not a small list, however close to the top of the list is a piece I have not disclosed until now.

    In 2010 we collected a colony of 200+ bed bugs at a property in London. The infestation was substantial and the environmental conditions of the home were far from "normal" parameters. All the samples in sealed jars from this case died and produced a white growth which we now know to be related to the fungus BB. While it clearly killed them in the jar it had not managed to do so in the home because we were in there treating.

    We worked out quickly that even with an out of control bed bug situation and a high level of natural fungus present control was not feasible. The case had still reached a 9/10 on our scale driven by the fact that the conditions needed for this to be successful are narrow at best. I have concluded it could work in some settings but it is far from working in all settings.

    If it were feasible we would have pursued it. As you can see and read from my other posts I am a huge green advocate having gone chemical free in 2014 and retrained my team. Part of that move was to specifically step away from a spray / treat approach because of its fundamental concept flaws. This may not initially make sense but there is an inherent failure to establish and reinforce personal responsibility in anything that is applied as a "solution" because it only ever treats the symptoms rather than the cause.

    This is the usually the point where Darwin coughs from stage right and points out that repeatedly apply selective environmental pressures only drives evolution.

    Finally if we acknowledge the role that bed bugs play in anxiety and fear and the impact on rational behavior we must also open up consideration to a hybrid of gondii and white knight. Those driven to seek a cure for the good of man and I am sure you will find a few of those around with their "awesome inventions".

    Some days we only know it to be the matrix because we saw it being built, its long since passed the point where a red or blue pill would kick in.

    David

  10. Livingagain

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Jul 26 2017 9:51:00
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    Whatever product was used in 2010 would not have been the Apprehend product that was just approved by the EPA. We have no idea how it came to be in that property or the skills of whoever decided to use an untested "related" product.

    When you mention the selective pressures of evolution, I'd say that this product has a very different mechanism than any other pesticide available for bed bugs, so it may be beneficial to take the selective pressure off of the current similar pesticides.

    Obviously David's the expert here, but this is a new product researched by a well-respected university, with good results. It seems to deserve to be given a chance.

  11. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Jul 26 2017 11:23:05
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    Hi,

    No product was used in 2010, the fungus is naturally occurring and the home was "loaded" with spores.

    OK it we take your logic down its natural evolution path you realise the flaw is that things do develop resistance to new modes of action. The prime example would be neonicitinoids which bed bugs started to develop resistance to answer 6 months in the field.

    Yes it deserves a chance but I will always object to testing being done by consumers like so many other failed products. Sorry if that seems a blunt point out but my response is with consumers in mind and petroleum based products deserve questions not respect.

    David

  12. blainsbrains

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    Posted 12 months ago
    Mon Aug 20 2018 18:29:03
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    @ bed-bugscouk

    Just so you know, I have used one of those spore remedies and I can say they work. They are gruesomely effective. If any one of them walks through an area with viable spores-2 week latency (I was using a water based emulsion in filtered water) they will bring it back to the colony and infect the entire tribe.

    The only caveat is immune compromised persons such as AIDS or cancer. For the record, I have Fibro, CFS and severe mold allergy and it did not aggravate my symptoms. I had more stress when I was getting bitten!

    As for the bedbugs developing resistance to the spores, that logic is upside down. Simpler life forms adapt and evolve more quickly to stressors that higher life forms. That sort of reasoning sounds as silly as saying influenza is going to have to worry about us adapting to it quicker than it can find a work around. Things don't happen like that in biology, man. If anything, the fungus will be the one who adapts quicker than the bedbug and the bedbugs will feel out pain at fighting a losing battle.

    As for the petroleum distillates, I can tell you I spoke with a manufacturer with the same concerns. I was informed their product is approved for use on organic crops for human consumption, even medical marijuana.

    FYI, paraffin oil and mineral oil are considered petroleum distillates. Given this is an emulsion, I'm guessing it's a light weight oil and not some awful carcinogen.

    Don't hate on the dinosaur, man. If it weren't for oil, you'd be riding an ox-cart and burning coal to fire your steam engine.


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