Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Bed Bug Treatment

Baking Papers

(26 posts)
  1. pleasehelp

    member
    Joined: Oct '07
    Posts: 299

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Fri Dec 7 2007 15:51:32
    #



    Login to Send PM

    <<I posted this originally on the "one of the most amazing things" thread, but am reposting here to start a more appropriate thread.>>

    RE baking: My oven only goes down to 175, but I'm baking my papers. I put them into a big metal covered roasting pan for 1 hour. No fire danger, and the roaster will keep any bugs from escaping out of the oven's ventilation. Thoughts?

  2. (deleted)

    Unregistered

    Posts: 1,453

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Fri Dec 7 2007 15:55:41
    #



    Login to Send PM

  3. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,255

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Fri Dec 7 2007 19:51:03
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks hopelessnomo. You have a great memory!

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  4. bugobsessed

    junior member
    Joined: Nov '07
    Posts: 108

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Fri Dec 7 2007 21:11:08
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Pleasehelp,

    Have you tried this yet? How did it go?

  5. stamps

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '07
    Posts: 106

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Fri Dec 7 2007 23:06:09
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Yes, please do let us know . . . I have recently convinced my boyfriend to invest in a thermal treatment business here in Denver. It is VERY much in infancy/planning stages, but he has lots of experience in construction and can navigate the complicated red tape associated with city/state licensing, insurance, training, etc. He's been looking for a new business venture for some time now and after seeing my hell with bedbugs and how big of a problem they're becoming in this area (and the demand for "green" technology) he's pretty excited about it.

    (I am too, even if it is mostly because I'll have thermal treatment available should this problem rear its ugly head again -- no bites for 7 weeks at this point, think good thoughts for me).

    We're thinking about starting with a chamber treatment setup and building the business from there -- we were actually wondering about treating papers, so please let us know the outcome of your experiment!

  6. pleasehelp

    member
    Joined: Oct '07
    Posts: 299

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 19:10:36
    #



    Login to Send PM

    All I can say is the papers came out nice & toasty & they (the papers) survived. I didn't inspect for live nymphs before or dead ones after - don't have the time right now. But will report back if/when I get more data...

  7. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,255

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 19:13:19
    #



    Login to Send PM

    stamps,

    You're the first Bedbugger who's told us they were going into the bed bug eradication business, though many have mused on doing so.

    Good luck to you!

  8. NotSoSnug

    member
    Joined: Nov '07
    Posts: 155

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 20:35:57
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I'm in the BB eradication business too. One Bug At A Time!

  9. jennifer09

    junior member
    Joined: Nov '07
    Posts: 66

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 21:28:28
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,
    I have decided to start a small consultation service here in L.A.! I will refer PCO's and entomologists. I'm planning to help people out in the first month. Provide info and support etc. Starting my website in January. I have to beat mine completely first, though.

  10. NotSoSnug

    member
    Joined: Nov '07
    Posts: 155

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 23:40:21
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Jennifer: If successfully beating BBs is a prerequisite to doing your consulting business I encourage you not to connect the two if possible. Insects will do what they do and if anything this blog/forum shows that our best efforts regarding BBs aren't predictable in their outcomes. You can still accomplish a lot while you're battling the bug.

  11. dinner

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '07
    Posts: 37

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 9 2007 19:03:10
    #



    Login to Send PM

    what about plastic windows on mail? will those melt? staples? do i put a pan of water in there for to make sure the bugs can jump into the oven (little bastards) or mineral oil? can they SWIM?

  12. pleasehelp

    member
    Joined: Oct '07
    Posts: 299

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 9 2007 21:38:39
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I haven't tried the plastic windows on mail. Staples should be fine. I didn't use any water. Since water motes are recommended for isolating beds, I presume bb's can't swim. But I read about an experiment somewhere where they were found to survive under water for long periods of time.

  13. nyjammin

    senior member
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 664

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 9 2007 21:57:49
    #



    Login to Send PM

    This is just my opinion and I'm not an expert, but I believe anything that has to do w/breathing or anything with the mouth, bbs can survive. bbs do not have mouths and do not need air. If they don't need air then they can survive water 'cause they don't need to breathe. Living in plastic for 18 months w/o air is amazing. I think the bbs eventually die, not of lack of air, but lack of starvation from no blood. Anything that kills them has to do with breaking down their waxy shell. They need that shell and w/o it they are doomed. Heat kills them because they are cooked. Cold kills them because they freeze to death. Murphy's kills them because their shell is damaged. bbs have beaks only used for numbing their victims and for obtaining blood. Nothing else.

  14. dinner

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '07
    Posts: 37

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Dec 9 2007 22:38:25
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Yeesh.

  15. NotSoSnug

    member
    Joined: Nov '07
    Posts: 155

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Mon Dec 10 2007 0:55:46
    #



    Login to Send PM

    The library protocol recommends putting some water in a separate bowl in the oven along with the papers so the paper doesn't dry out too much.

  16. NotSoSnug

    member
    Joined: Nov '07
    Posts: 155

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Mon Dec 10 2007 1:30:51
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Bedbugs like other insects have little valves called spiracles along their body which diffuse oxygen and CO2. They need oxygen the same as we do to facilitate cell function. But the release of CO2 and uptake of oxygen can vary depending on metabolic requirements and environmental conditions. So they can keep their spiracles close for hours or even days if conditions permit and when they open them they do so in variable bursts. Hence the ability to withstand water. But eventually they do require oxygen. Under conditions of dormancy oxygen requirements would be further reduced.

    Some background: Discontinuous Respiration in Insects: Role of the Spiracles
    http://www.biolbull.org/cgi/reprint/119/3/494.pdf

  17. johndoe

    newbite
    Joined: Jun '08
    Posts: 8

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Thu Jun 26 2008 0:42:51
    #



    Login to Send PM

    qoute:

    <<<Bedbugs like other insects have little valves called spiracles along their body which diffuse oxygen and CO2. They need oxygen the same as we do to facilitate cell function. But the release of CO2 and uptake of oxygen can vary depending on metabolic requirements and environmental conditions. So they can keep their spiracles close for hours or even days if conditions permit and when they open them they do so in variable bursts. Hence the ability to withstand water. But eventually they do require oxygen. Under conditions of dormancy oxygen requirements would be further reduced.>>>

    NotSoSnug's qoute above is just the answer that I'm looking for.

    Hi, folks, I'm new to the forum and found this thread from a Yahoo search(altough I already knew about the forum). But I'm glad that I finally registered and I look forward to many discussion about this worldwide "plague" that has beset mankind.

    But in NotSoSnug's qoute, he or she said, "But eventually they do require oxygen" and what I would like to know is approximately *how long* is "eventually"? And the reason why I asked is because the exterminator is coming to my apartment complex Thursday morning(06/27/08) and the last time that he was here, he told me that I needed to wash ALL my clothes. Well, unfortunately, that didn't get done, however, I put just about all my clothes in air tight plastic bags(with the exception of some clothing that I have been currently wearing). But I was looking to get an idea of how long any bedbugs or their eggs could last in those closed plastic bags.

  18. buggyinsocal

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jun '08
    Posts: 2,431

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Thu Jun 26 2008 2:56:11
    #



    Login to Send PM

    to johndoe:

    I've only been dealing with BB for about a week now, but while the PCO (the term that professionals who control pests prefer, also easier to type) told me that BB can live for up to 6 months, many people here say that if you're putting items into storage in sealed bags, you should plan to leave them there for a minimum of 18 months, because it is quite possible for BB to live over a year without feeding.

    I think there's info on that in this FAQ. Look at the section under "Don't Bag Everything You Own."

  19. fightorflight

    senior member
    Joined: Jan '08
    Posts: 704

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Thu Jun 26 2008 3:15:18
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Yes, the 18 months target is somewhat anecdotal and uncorroborated, I believe. In other words, it's probably overkill in 99% of situations. But bedbugs are a little bit like nuclear reactor meltdown - you don't want there to be even a .01% chance.

  20. johndoe

    newbite
    Joined: Jun '08
    Posts: 8

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Jul 9 2008 3:09:38
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks for the info, buggyinsocal and fightorflight. I will keep my clothing items sealed in the bag that they're in until I'm ready to wash them. But actually though, I took about 10 of my shirts out the bag to wash them and I hope there weren't any nymphs in the bag that espaced...although the exterminator will be treating my apartment again until there's evidence that they're all gone.

  21. johndoe

    newbite
    Joined: Jun '08
    Posts: 8

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Jul 9 2008 3:21:20
    #



    Login to Send PM

    BTW, I have a couple of questions. I have neck ties and sweaters in my sealed bag that normally don't get machine washed or shouldn't be machine washed and I would like to know how I should go about cleaning them to get rid of any possible bbs or nymphs that may on them. Also, should I have my coats and jackets sealed in a bag too?(I really don't think there are any in my coats and jackets.) And if so, how should I go about cleaning them, like the suede ones?

  22. johndoe

    newbite
    Joined: Jun '08
    Posts: 8

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Jul 9 2008 22:10:11
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I'm guessing that there's a limit on how many questions a person can ask before people stop answering their questions.

  23. buggyinsocal

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jun '08
    Posts: 2,431

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Jul 9 2008 22:30:42
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I would search the messages here for info on dry cleaning. My PCO said that dry cleaning would kill BB. Somewhere, and I can't find it, people here said that some dry cleaning processes did and others didn't. I would say dry clean everything that you can't launder, even if you think that they aren't in there.

  24. johndoe

    newbite
    Joined: Jun '08
    Posts: 8

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Thu Jul 10 2008 4:52:52
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks, buggyinsocal. Also, I heard that dry cleaning suede is very expensive.

  25. johndoe

    newbite
    Joined: Jun '08
    Posts: 8

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Thu Jul 10 2008 5:11:45
    #



    Login to Send PM

    By the way, to comment on the main topic of this thread, I had never thought about baking papers before, although it sounds like a very valid idea since a person wouldn't know whether or not bbs had laid eggs in one's papers and letters, etc. Also, I recently cleaned out a box of old letters and bills, etc., and I had noticed that after I had piled all the papers, letters and magazines onto my desk to decipher through them so that I could keep what I needed and either throw away or shred all the other stuff, I had noticed that I had started to receive quite a few bites on my arms.

  26. mangycur

    senior member
    Joined: Sep '07
    Posts: 423

    offline

    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Jul 16 2008 21:16:36
    #



    Login to Send PM

    My oven only goes down to 300 or so--So can I leave papers in for only 1 hour?


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

294,657 posts in 49,519 topics over 153 months by 21,698 of 22,141 members. Latest: carterscott, ohkayiguess, shawnpayne1982