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Are the bedbugs feeding on birds?

(23 posts)
  1. ohno4321

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun Apr 3 2011 15:14:19
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    Its been about a month since i have had confirmation of bedbugs. I am suspicious of one spot that is a built in cabinet area. Items removed from this are were put in a storage bin in which I subsequently found bedbugs. I just caught a live bedbug in this area with nightwatch although its so small its difficult to positively identify.

    This cabinet area runs against the ceiling and is adjacent to an outside will. On the outside there are birds nesting in the eaves. This is shoddy construction. There is very little separation between the cabinets and the nesting area.

    My theory is that the bedbugs are in the cabinets and are feeding on the nesting birds. Is this a reasonable hypothesis?

  2. ohno4321

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Apr 4 2011 23:22:15
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    Sorry if I am bumping this thread. I'm still looking for any information if bedbugs will feed on non-human hosts.

    My current plan is to have the birds removed, apply steam and then bedlam, seal the nesting area, and then continue monitoring.

  3. buggybattler

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Apr 5 2011 10:17:26
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    Hi Ohno,
    I'm no expert, but it seems that a bedbug, even eggs and immature stages, are never too small to identify. I would suggest you try to get whatever you found identified. Bird nests often harbor mites (bird mites?) that may go looking for another food source once the nestlings leave the nest.
    Just curious, any idea what species of birds you have?

  4. ohno4321

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Apr 5 2011 22:45:44
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    The birds are common sparrows.

    I'll post what photos I have but the quality doesn't seem sufficient for identification. The subject of my photos is about 1/15th the size of an adult bedbug. I have had previous confirmation of adults.

    The birds will be removed in the next few days. It seems like a good starting place with any infestation, remove other creatures which are in the building or in my case immediately adjacent to my living space.

    I am prepared for them to look for another host (me) and that's fine. I just can't have them multiplying next to a ready food source.

  5. ohno4321

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Apr 5 2011 23:04:02
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  6. lilmary12585

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Apr 6 2011 0:14:12
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    Can you put it on a different surface to change the contrast?

  7. lilmary12585

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Apr 6 2011 0:16:30
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    I do recall a couple of post from posters concerned that their dogs were being affected. One finding blood stains around their animals.

  8. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Apr 6 2011 4:20:44
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    The nymph photos do not look like bed bugs or bat bugs.

    You said 1/15... Are the nymph specimens are less than 1mm?

    Can you try scanning the specimens to produce a better resolution?

  9. KillerQueen

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Apr 6 2011 10:19:28
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    The picture of the adult "could" be a bat bug. I need a more clear picture of the pronotum (section just below the eye) to be sure. I'm also looking at it on a 3 inch screen, my pc at home may give me a better view.

    But for now .... From what I can see, I'll say it's a bat bug.

  10. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Apr 6 2011 11:14:56
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    I just alerted Lou Sorkin to this thread.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  11. EffeCi

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Apr 6 2011 13:53:07
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    Looks like a Cimex sp, but not like a Cimex lectularius....
    Probably batbug (Cimex adjunctus)

  12. ohno4321

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Apr 6 2011 18:54:31
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    Thanks All,

    >>You said 1/15... Are the nymph specimens are less than 1mm?

    I am not sure how to answer this. All the photos were at the same magnification so if I knew the size of an adult bed/bat bug I could extrapolate down.

    I got rid of the specimens (bad move on my part) so I won't have additional photos.

    I haven't seen any bats just birds.

    Whether bat or bedbug should I do anything differently?

    My current plan is to apply steam from the inside, apply bedlam from the inside after its dry (i am will be acquiring a respirator. Next day working from the outside, expose the nesting area, remove the nesting material, apply bedlam and then reseal the nesting area so that it is inaccessible. Then continue to monitor.

    Thanks again and I am much appreciative of all your replies.

  13. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Apr 6 2011 20:17:58
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    An adult is roughly 5mm long... a bed bug nymph is about 1 mm long.

    Bat bugs are roughly the same size.

    One reason I didn't think the specimen was a bat bug was the description of the size... 1/15 would be too small for a bat bug nymph.

    I highly recommend that you do not treat anything yet.

    The birds and nests need to be removed before the roosting area is treated.

    If this is not done correctly... you may drive more bat bugs in the occupied space.

    The occupied space should be treated last.

    Consider hiring a professional for this work.

  14. ohno4321

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Apr 6 2011 20:46:12
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    I appreciate your advice. The bird are being removed tomorrow by my landlord. My professional who has treated the entire home previously will not be available until next week. The roosting area are eaves directly adjacent and separated by an exterior wall to a row of ceiling high built-in cabinets. My pro previously use bedlam in the cabinets. My plan was to treat the cabinets from the inside so that on removal of the nests any infiltrators would be attempting to move into a treated space. After nesting removal from the exterior I would treat the roosting space. So my plan was to treat the immediate interior space and then the exterior after removal. Hopefully this sounds more correct.

    With the removal scheduled for tomorrow and the unlikelihood that I can get a pro here at the same time my options are not great. I agree that getting a pro to coordinate with the removal would be best but that does not seem possible. I'm somewhat forced into DIY by this timing.

    Thanks again.

  15. loubugs

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Apr 7 2011 6:21:26
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    Wish I could actually see the specimens under a microscope. Doesn't look like the common bed bug. I suggest searching for alternative host sites. You might have a bat roost somewhere. I'd be interested in seeing any actual specimens.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  16. loubugs

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Apr 7 2011 6:31:30
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    It's also possible that it's bird related. I have been rereading your posts. There's something about your bugs that look different and I can't make it out from the images.

  17. EffeCi

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Apr 7 2011 17:13:42
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    There's something about your bugs that look different and I can't make it out from the images.

    Yeah... hairs too long, wingpads too big, eye's shape very different... that's enough to say that it's not a Cimex lectularius, but not to exactly identify the species.

  18. ohno4321

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Apr 7 2011 18:39:47
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    I regret not saving the specimens, I would gladly send to anyone who would want them or attempt to get better mugshots since this additional conversation has definitely piqued my curiosity. If I do get any more samples I hope they are dead!

    I'm using this to get the photos.

    http://www.amazon.com/Veho-VMS004DELUXE-USB-Powered-Microscope/dp/B0025U0L8Y

    Its pretty limited.

  19. spideyjg

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Apr 7 2011 21:04:05
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    That appears to only be on the 20X scale. At full zoom all needed details could be seen but you have to take it out of any container

    That scope is similar to the one I have and at ESA Lou had some BB samples and full zoom the wingpads alone would fill the screen.

    If you get another sample kill it and get a high mag shot of the head, eyes, and the pronotum. The pronotum is the U shaped "horse collar" that is on either side of the head.

    Jim

  20. ohno4321

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Apr 8 2011 19:09:46
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    I found this in the cabinets after bird removal.

    http://i1202.photobucket.com/albums/bb379/ohno4321/bat.jpg

    The software I have only allows zooming at the lowest resolution. I think this is the best shot I an get.

    Batbug?

    I'm somehow happy that I am now the only food source.

  21. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Apr 8 2011 22:02:08
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    Bat bug

    The hairs on the protonum are long compared to a bed bug.

    Compare the length of the hair with the width of the eyes... The bat bug hair will be more than 100% of the width of the eyes... A bed bug's hair is 50% of the width of the eyes or less.

    The shape of the head and the protonum is much more clear in this photograph.

    Here is a link for an identification key from The University of Minnesota
    http://www.ipmctoc.umn.edu/Bed_bug_versus_Bat_Bug.pdf

  22. ohno4321

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Apr 8 2011 23:14:15
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    http://www.journal-news.net/page/content.detail/id/551677/Confusion-between-bed-and-bat-bugs.html?nav=5067

    "Fortunately, although they will feed on human blood, they cannot reproduce on that food source."

    Nice if it was true but I find this hard to believe. Any comments?

  23. Louise

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Apr 9 2011 0:07:29
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    Maybe?

    We had bat bugs in our cabin. We had excluded the bats the previous fall, and when we came out the following spring, we found our first bug (in June).

    Once we became aware of them (not through bug bites of any sort...well, perhaps one on one of our kids), we started bagging clothes and leaving the bagged clothes in plastic storage bins in the front room, and also encased all mattresses and boxsprings. We also caulked every seam and crevice in the "bat bug room"...except - in retrospect - the cracks under the lino, which is under the carpet, on the floor.

    We never treated.

    We never brought any home with us.

    It was still really stressful, although not nearly what a bed bug infestation (or possibly a different type of bat bug infestation) would be like, I'm sure.

    We closed up for the winter in September, having never seen any further sign of the critters. In all, we found four bugs (two of which were alive, one drowned, and one dead in the vacuum storage compartment), one casing on the windowsill, and one *possible* fecal mark on a sheet.

    When we returned last spring, we neither saw nor experienced any further sign of bat bugs. The cold winter must have done them in, if there were any still around. Perhaps these bat bugs *couldn't* reproduce on our blood. Heck, they didn't seem too interested in us, at any rate. Um...except for the one we found hanging out in the middle of a mattress, perhaps. Ick.

    Had we not found the first one, dead, we *may* have never known we had them. In fact, it seems that they must have been there for the previous three summers when we were out there (as were the bats, apparently), as well as for some time with the previous owners of the cabin.

    That's been our experience so far. We'll see what this summer brings.

    Apparently people in Ohio have a different, more...invasive?...type of bat bug?

    I have no idea why/how we got off so easy.


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