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Any advice on how to pack uhaul for vikane treatment

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  1. IveBeenBugged

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Apr 16 2008 22:00:40
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    Yes I'm back and still on the mend. Been offline a few weeks for surgery. It went well.

    I have 6 weeks left on my lease and am just now able to get out and find a new place. I have yet to stay at my place since the surgery.

    I'm having my things vikane gassed in a uhaul and would appreciatte any advice on how to pack the truck for this.

    After the last 6 months of dueling with the landlord and being lied to time after time I find myself not trusting anyone (including the company that will be doing the treatment - not a good thing) and would like to hear what some of you familiar with vikane treatment suggest for packing.

    I tried finding this on my own but after reading endless pdf's online I have only come across how to prepare a house for the treatment.

    It's not that I don't trust them I would just like to hear from more than one source on how to pack the truck.

    Any suggestions would be much appreciatted.

    I'm using primarily pllastic bins that can be opened once at the treatment site. I'm wondering if boxes would be ok for the treatment. Money is getting tight and I don't think I can swing everything in the bins at this point.

    Any do's and don'ts?

  2. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Thu Apr 17 2008 11:53:24
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    Hi,

    Replying via forum rather than PM to share the thoughts.

    Vikane is not approved in the UK so I cant comment on its specifics. That having been said I would suggest that you look at several companies and go with the one that gives you the best advice on packing and preparation.

    I personally do not do commodity fumigation which is the correct term for this type of work. To avoid spread in high density living situations (i.e. adjoined properties) I no longer offer fumigation as part of treatment unless its a stand alone property or isolated area such as a vehicle and then only do it in combination with residual treatments.

    From my understand of the process you want to pack so that the fumigant can circulate into all the areas so as a good rule of thumb don't get the smallest vehicle you can, go for a medium sized one with room to let the gases penetrate.

    Hope that helps.

    David

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  3. IveBeenBugged

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Apr 19 2008 6:44:48
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    I would assume to pack lightly and loosely. I was also going to have the new place treated before I move in, Would that make more sense that having it treated once I have already moved in?

    When searching online for commodity fumigation the only thing I run accross deals mostly with grains ect (also referred to as commodity) or how to prepare a house for vikane treatment. I have yet to run accross info for preparing a truck for treatment.

    I hadn't thought of using a larger truck to spread things out more.

    Thank you David.

  4. paulaw0919

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Apr 19 2008 8:32:27
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    Remember when laundering? Loads were 1/2 full, not packed. Think of the same thing. If plastic bins need to be used, I would not even have the tops in the truck if I could help it.(that's just my own paranoia talking) Everything very very loosely packed, bins half full. You can Vikane pretty much anything but food and medicines. Toiletries such as shampoo's, body lotion is fine as long as not medicated. (no anti- itch creams, medications) When our home was structurally fumigated I went as far as dismantling all picture frames, cd's, dvd's, that could be dismantled. The company I used didn't give us much guidance on this either. I called then and other fumigation companies for advise. I took whatever advise I received and went went a bit further in precautions just to be sure. The only thing that made me nervous were our precious photo albums for the sleeves are plastic and I feared due to the fumigant not being able to penetrate plastic that there would be a problem. After the fumigation I took all but 3 albums that are currently in use and put them in XL Ziplocks for storage for 18 months. We have the three albums out and hasn't been a problem. Our fumigation was done early fall '07. I hope this helps a bit. (I'm going to try and PM you)If there is anything you think I may be of help with I'll try.

  5. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Apr 19 2008 9:22:08
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    You need to follow the instructions from the fumigator. He or she know the properties of
    the gas and how it will interact with various items and materials. It is important you get packing protocols and follow them for best results.

  6. IveBeenBugged

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Apr 19 2008 9:40:48
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    Winston I have talked with the company that will be doing it and will be going over the protocols with them again next week when I confirm the date with them in person.

    I seem to be having some serious trust issues and had hoped that some of you with knowledge on the subject might be able to confirm what I have already been told.

    They come highly recommended by a professor at the University of Florida who teaches the course on how to do this.

    I guess I need to reign in my paranoia a bit on this and follow their instructions.

    Any thoughts would still be much appreciatted though.

  7. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Apr 19 2008 10:59:24
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    Florida is a state with a good deal of fumigation experience both in terms of food pests
    but more important to you because of residential termite fumigations. Actually the Bed Bug & Beyond folks in NY are actually from FL. If the company you are going to use was recommended by someone from the academic side it sounds like you are in good hands.
    Good luck and try not to freak.

  8. LindseyNicole

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Apr 19 2008 22:24:02
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    On the subject of vikane... my family has been helping me in contacting local PCO's because of my furniture that is being moved out of my apartment. I'm putting it in storage but I had considered having everything treated while it was in the storage facility. The person my father talked to said that it would have to be tented with plastic (I figured as much) and then left for 3 days with someone guarding it. Does that sound like something normal? I know this stuff is powerful and deadly but wow.

  9. paulaw0919

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Apr 19 2008 22:34:42
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    Sounds like Vikane fumigation. (could be methal bromide or something like that, but from what I hear, vikane is the poison of choice these days.)Yes, powerful and very toxic. Only done by licensed professionals. Good news is that the gas dissipates very quickly and leaves no residue. So, if you are going this route, don't worry.

  10. LindseyNicole

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sat Apr 19 2008 23:37:04
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    Oh, I'm not concerned about the after-effects or anything like that. Rather, my concern is for the potential cost, particularly if I have to pay to have a guard posted by my couch for 3 days! haha

  11. IveBeenBugged

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Apr 20 2008 9:46:28
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    Lindsey 3 days sounds like a long time. The procedure when done to a house or uhaul truck takes 24 hours. Mind you this does not include the setting up of the tenting (yes the tent the truck much like a structuresetting up the monitors or the removing of the tenting once done.

    After everything is ready and all the monitors (to make sure the gas levels are at the right place) are in place they then seal the structure to be gassed.

    From what I was told it's 16 hours of gas and 8 hours of airing out. I was told this by more than one company.

    As far as I know no company would treat things in a storage facility. You would have to tent the whole building or seal your unit somehow from the inside to make it airtight. It would be much harder to do at a storage facility. You would need to move the things into a storage truck and then take it to their facility to be tented and treated.

    Any PCO's out there let us know if I have that right.

    Thanks for the input guys.

  12. fightorflight

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Mon Apr 21 2008 1:13:43
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    IBB - I've been thinking about this. (Why do I spend my free time thinking about bedbugs???) Anyway, I remember a comment a while back that said they packed their stuff loosely in boxes, nothing sealed, and then poked or cut holes in the boxes. Which got me thinking that those stackable, open plastic crates would be perfect for this, except that you're starting to run out of money for more plastic crates. Can you get a home improvement crate loan from Home Depot?

  13. IveBeenBugged

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Thu Apr 24 2008 16:49:18
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    fightorflight I just happen to have some of the plastic crates you are talking about. I had used them previously for vinyl records storage. Unfortunately the records were on a shelf right next to my bed during the ongoing bb infestation in my building. Needless to say I have pitched a large amount of records the ones I saved (and even the ones pitched) are now in sealed plastic bags for another year.

    I had thougth that banana boxes might be a good idea for packing things but was unsure if I should use cardboard or not. I would think that with the treatment it would be ok. I will find out tomorrow when I meet and confirm the date for the vikane treatment.

    I hadn't thought about poking holes in boxes that may not be a bad idea. I'll check with them on that.

    Thanks for the tip.

  14. buggery

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Thu Apr 24 2008 21:37:34
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    Hi Bugged. I just had Vikane treatment done and I'm still seeing bb's in my new place. Here's what went wrong (i think). The truck was just big enough for my belongings. (If you are playing tetris to get your stuff into the truck you need a bigger truck.) I had plastic bins stacked on top of each other. I trusted the movers (recommended by the Vikane company) to know how to handle the packing part. The Vikane company and the movers were not on the same page even though they'd said they'd worked together before. They should've known not stack plastic bins on top of each other, creating a seal i think.

    The PCO told me that cardboard boxes (and solid wood for that matter) are fully permeated by the Vikane (and plastic isn't) so I think it's actually better (only in this case of course) to have cardboard boxes, not plastic. if you do use plastic bins, they need to not be covered/stacked.

    I also had only two days to prepare for the treatment and moving (thanks landlord!) and so I think if I did it again i would really go through and toss the stuff I could part with beforehand. Just easier to deal with only the necessary stuff. The main thing though, is to maintain a healthy skepticism (if not mistrust) and choose a PCO based on how ORGANIZED they are and how thoroughly they answer each and every question you have. Good luck and please PM me if you want to talk a bit more about the company i used for the Vikane.

  15. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Thu Apr 24 2008 22:33:44
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    IBB,
    If the folks doing the treatment are giving you a guarantee or warranty of any kind, then they MUST give you comprehensive instruction and you MUST follow it to a "t."

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  16. theprey

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Thu Apr 24 2008 23:25:20
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    If you're using the same company my husband and I did -- and if you're in New York City, you probably are -- you'll want to leave at least 20% free space in the truck. We also cut holes in our boxes, as I believe someone else suggested doing above.

    We had the Vikane treatment as we left our infested Greenpoint apartment. (It was a classic situation: landlord shoddily exterminated someone else's apartment above ours and drove them into our unit. We were only there for a month after this happened -- I saw our first bug the day after the upstairs apartment was exterminated, and I've been so paranoid about bedbugs for so long that I knew exactly what the thing was when I saw it marching in broad daylight across our bed. We immediately wrapped our mattress in plastic, labeled it, and threw it out. We took apart our bed frame, wrapped it in plastic and threw it out. We had the landlord's crap exterminator in, and I did laundry for days. But we were still, I believe, being bitten. My face, arms, back, and sometimes legs had clumps of red itchy spots. We disposed of the things we did because we knew we were moving and didn't initially know about Vikane. It sounded like a dream come true when we were told it was an option....)

    We also had our new apartment treated by a very reputable PCO in New York City. And we dipped our two cats and only wore completely new clothes into the new place, and we had the bulk of our laundry fumigated in the Ryder.

    Despite all of these precautions, I'm not entirely sure that we left the bugs behind. I have sensitive skin in general, so I can't be sure, but I think I'm still being bitten intermittently.

    I spray every four or five days with Bedlam and recently have been using Kleen Green rather than Sterifab. Sometimes I think there's no problem; then once or twice a week I'll wake up with a strange itch or pair of itches somewhere, and I'll decide that we're not rid of them, after all. Last month I had a particularly gross pair of itches at the crease of each arm, right where a nurse would draw blood -- I say gross because they developed into large, fungal-like patches as I slept with short sleeves over the course of that week -- and both went away after I slept in long-sleeve shirts for a couple of weeks.

    But I digress. I guess my point is: The Vikane treatment is a great option, but even if you're completely anal, there's always some little bit of risk. After the Vikane treatment, I suggest investing in a bed bug dog not long after you move, if you suspect there may be any continuing problem. Take it from me: you want to know if you've brought bed bugs with you. We're nearing the end of our 90-day warranty with both the Vikane company and the PCO (our PCO doesn't do inspections, only treats, and seems skeptical that we're still having a problem), and it's frustrating that I'm still not satisfied that there are no bugs. It's very hard to prove a negative, but I think we're going to have the K9 in as soon as possible to see if there's an identifiable problem.

  17. fightorflight

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Fri Apr 25 2008 2:22:30
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    theprey - good info. I think a BB dog would be a good idea for you because I have extensively chronicled here my problems with lingering sensations, old bites that itch again months later and flare-ups. At this point, I don't want to jinx myself, but I do believe it is possible to have what seem like fresh bites that aren't.

    These damn predators are so confounding in every possible way!

  18. theprey

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Fri Apr 25 2008 7:08:58
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    fightorflight, I've been lurking for a while, and believe me, I think I've read every single post about bites versus phantom bites! It's just so hard to tell, especially since we dealt with the bugs for such a short time in our old place and I consequently have very little to compare these bites (or "bites) to.

    The only other symptom I've had are occasional black spots, but they alway smear. If they're bed bug fecal matter, they shouldn't smear, right? Not unless I've just happened to come upon them very soon after a bug left them and darted off to hide? And I wouldn't always be doing that? But then, if not from a bed bug, where are they coming from?

    Yes, the psychological effects of the bugs are almost worse than the bugs themselves.

  19. IveBeenBugged

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Apr 27 2008 11:01:51
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    theprey where are you finding these black spots that smear? I have found similar spots when I first found out about the bed bugs and they did indeed smear. I noticed them on the sheets at first and then when I moved my bed I noticed them on the floor right by the wall at the head of the bed. I believe they came through that wall after I had moved my bed against it.

    I was going to pack the truck about half full (no more) I am already going through things and pitching a lot of stuff (bagged and labeled). I was thinking of the plastic bins but not to stack them merely to have one layer so they could be opened once at the treatment site. I am not taking the bed with - sorry to many bad memories and it's an older bed I was getting ready to replace anyway. I will label the bed & boxspring (already encased in the good bed bug encasements) and put them out the night of bulk pick up. I think the banana boxes may be a good alternative as they are not completely closed and have openings in the sides.

    I am taking very little with as I don't want to bring them with. I have actually thought of just having the TV (I just bought it) electronics clothing the computer and a futon (that for some reason has yet to become infested) and pitching everything else. Except for pots pans and that sort of thing.

    While I realize this may be over kill I'm tired of not wanting to sleep in my own place for fear of getting bitten again.

    Just to let you all know it's been a month since I have stayed at my place for other reasons (the bugs just kind of added to my not wanting to stay after surgery). While most of my bites are now gone I still have a few that keep popping up in the same place. This seems to happen when I exert myself and sweat. It also seems to be affected by things like deodorant soap and certain detergents and fabric softeners.

    I only noticed this as the person I have been staying with uses different household items like soap then I do. After switching to the things I normally use the bites are now fading. I no longer use dryer sheets - something in them seems to make the old bites reactivate. For some reason the liquid does not.

  20. theprey

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Mon Apr 28 2008 0:51:52
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    IveBeenBugged, thanks so much for checking in. I described the spots I'm (infrequently) seeing here:
    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/smeary-bed-bug-feces-on-sheets

    I know you're in the midst of packing to move, so no rush, but when you have a chance can you tell me a little more about what you found and how things developed?

    The single layer of uncovered plastic boxes sounds reasonable, although I agree that the banana crates are probably safer. As someone who may very well have brought bugs with me despite having vikane treatment -- and the new place exterminated! -- I'd advocate taking the safest possible route.

    Thanks, too, for the info about what causes your flare-ups.

  21. fightorflight

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Mon Apr 28 2008 2:25:55
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    IBB - speaking of "taking the safest possible route," you might want to reconsider taking that futon. You can find something to sit on while you save the money for a new one and, let's face it, futon couches aren't exactly a featured item in the Design Within Reach catalogue. Just because you're getting your things Vikaned is no absolute guarantee of success. I would still want to minimize my chances (of taking bugs). Just keep asking yourself, is it worth risking everything for this (whatever "this" is)?

  22. IveBeenBugged

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Apr 30 2008 9:56:12
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    fightorflight as strange as this seems the futon is the only place (besides the computer area) of my apartment I have not been bitten. I know it can take a while for the bites to show up but when I sleep on the futon (and yes I know that is not a wise thing to do) I never have any new bites the next day. I have been leery of sleeping on it to much so as to keep it bb free.

    I had posted about this a few months ago as I am confused as to why it is the only piece of furniture I have that I have not been bitten on. The bed & chairs yes the futon no.

    I'm probably cursing myself by posting this and will probably get bitten now but I do find this perplexing that they don't seem to like the futon.

  23. (deleted)

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Wed Apr 30 2008 10:34:43
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    IBB, best of luck with the move!

  24. Adele

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    Sun Jun 8 2008 15:02:13
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    CAn someone PLEASE help me?

    I am getting a vikane fumigation at the end of the month and I am very very scared that I will not leave these horrible things behind me - they are in a lot of my stuff - clothes and shoes and such - everywhere.

    At the end of the month I am moving into a new apartment in a very nice building and ALL of my stuff is going into an extra large U-Haul for Vikane fumigation. I will just be leaving with the clothes on my back and my dogs who will go straight to the groomers

    The company doing the Vikane is not packing me - a different company - Pest Away - is coming to pack my stuff

    here are the specifics-

    1) my heavy furniture is gone - the only large peice of furniture is my armoire and I am taking a couple of chest of drawers and some chairs but mostly my clothes, towels and sheets and shoes and papers are being fumed.

    Even at that - there is a lot of stuff - I estimate all of the boxes would fit into a 20 ft U-haul - so I actually rented a 24' U-haul

    2) the fumigation company told me to pack stuff loosely in thin boxes and leave the tops open and cut holes in the sides

    3) they told me nothing wrapped in plastic - or if it is wrapped in plastic then it needs to be cut open

    4) they told me to use a truck larger than one I would normally need so they can fit in fans on each side and not stack stuff too tightly

    5) i have some plastic boxes for papers and some luggage that I will leave open and unsealed

    6) since I threw out most of my furniture - the bulk of my problem with BB has been in my clothes and shoes

    7) about a month ago I brought ALL of my clothes to the dry cleaner and even though I told the them about the BB - the clothes STILL came back infested - so I already had most of my clothes & shoes fumigated 2 weeks ago so I can have clean clothes to wear to work

    this will be a 2nd fumigation for some of that stuff

    the fumigation will be shot for 24 hours and the truck will sit for 2 weeks - the truck will sit in the mid July hot sun outside under a black tarp so there will be considerably heat built up in the truck

    PLEASE, PLEASE BedBuggers - PLEASE tell me if there is anything else that I need to know or to do for this treatment to be successful

    I need to ask the company doing the fumigation about food, cleaning supplies, maekup and other stuff that could melt - does anyone have any advice?

    I need to rid myself of these things in my life

    Adele

    PS - I am trying to cover all of my bases - so my car, which was also infested - i had that fumigated as well so it is ok.

    My office is currently infested and the company I work for is exterminating it - but they are telling me that there is nothing there. Yesterday I saw one crawl out of my phone but I could not catch it and I am very concerned about reinfesting myself after all of these arrangements. I am thinking about buying some Suspend and starting to spray myself - would that work?

    please advise I need help!!!!

  25. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Jun 8 2008 20:11:40
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    Adele,

    Sorry you're having a difficult time.

    As far as the prep for vikane gas fumigation, the only ones who can advise with any authority are those doing the treatment. You must ask their advice and follow their prep instructions.

    As far as work, I would not recommend treating your workplace. There are surely liability issues in doing so. Try and get a sample to show someone at work.

  26. Scarafaggio

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Jun 8 2008 20:16:48
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    Adele, I hope when you say you are thinking about "spraying yourself" with suspend, you don't mean spraying it on your body. Don't do that.

    As far as treating your surroundings, a friend of mine who's still in the pest control business was telling me last week that they're not having such great success with Suspend anymore. (This is purely anecdotal, of course.) Also, treating for bedbugs is more of a skill game than strictly a chemical one. Of course, that could be said for most pest control jobs, really. In any case, it's not a good idea to treat an area that is already being treated by someone else.

    As for the office, are you sure it's infested? Have you considered using traps or sticky tape to try to catch specimens? Again, it's a bad idea to treat an area that already is being treated by someone else.

    Regarding your other specific questions:

    Food: Vikane is not labeled for use on foods. In fact, it is specifically forbidden to use it on food products other than food in cans, tightly-sealed glass bottles, etc. Frankly, I suggest you consume the food prior to fumigation, and discard anything that's not in cans or tightly-sealed jars or bottles.

    If that's impossible, you can store foods packaged in boxes in heavy-duty Ziplock-type bags and not bother fumigating them. Before using them, examine them (through the bags) and see if there are any signs of infestation. If so, deep six it while still sealed in the bag.

    Just as an aside, I routinely take all newly-purchased, non-canned or bottled foods and place them in Ziplock bags before storing them in my cupboards. My concern isn;t bedbugs, specifically, but stored-product pests (beetles, weevils, moths, etc.). It's amazing how much stuff comes from the supermarket infested with grain beetles and so forth. It's a bit of an inconvenience to bag everything, but worthwhile in my opinion.

    Cleaning supplies: How much stuff are we talking about? Wouldn't it be easier to replace it? Nonetheless, if the jars are tightly sealed, it should be okay to gas these items; but I would be concerned about the effects of heat upon them.

    Cosmetics: This one is tricky. Cosmetics are chemicals, and some of them are proprietary and based on "trade secrets." I wouldn't want to be in the position of trying to figure out what possible reactions might occur. Also, some of them might melt. Better to toss them or store them in Ziplock-type bags if they are expensive or irreplaceable.

    Clothes and shoes: Can be fumigated or treated with heat. If fumigated, be sure to allow plenty of extra time for desorption on shoes and other leather items. Especially shoes. You don't want to put the shoes on while the gas is still desorbing.

    I know you've been through a lot, Adele, and the temptation is to throw caution to the wind and launch an all-out chemical offensive. But pesticides are poisons by nature, and we have to be careful with them. Better to throw stuff out than to risk hurting yourself by contaminating things that will be going into or onto your body.

    -Scarafaggio

  27. Adele

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Sun Jun 8 2008 21:19:56
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    Scarafaggio & Nobugs

    Thank you for your thorough responses - I will also circle back to the fumigation comapny and ask them what to do as well

    I forgot to ask about the electronics - i know my computer and TV can be fumed but what about the heat? will the heat damage them? I suspect so

    and no i did not meant that I would be spraying myself with Suspend for my office - i meant that I would buy Suspend and spray it around my office area

    i am very fustrated with the management company of my office - they know about my infestation and are really not taking this seriously.

    I am going through so much expense and trouble with the vikane and the move that I REALLY need to make sure they are gone. I suspected that I was being bitten during the day because I normally react right wway to bites and i know when i leave in the morning that i'm wearing clean clothes - they've already been dry cleaned and/or fumed plus they are sealed in plastic. no more bugs in that stuff

    Also I am not being bitten in my bed anymore - i have it sealed in mattress protectors and on a metal frame and separated from the wall

    so the bites have slowed down considerably at home but at work as the day wore on at work I FELT them crawling on my feet and legs and I FELT them biting on my back & neck . Sure enough I go home and there are bites - they must be at work

    on friday i saw one crawl out of of my phone in mid-day!!! it was a small one but still I think there are many more there. I could not cath it

    i've suggested to them that they get a dog up there to check the area - i even offered to pay for it!! the dog was the only way I knew how extensive my infestation was - the BB were in all of my clothes and shoes - which were in a storage locker

    at work they have some sticky traps down and so far no catches - but I don't think those things are all that accurate

    I know - Nobugs - there may be liabilities with me spraying at my office - but what can i do? i can't go through the expense and trouble of moving and vikane all my stuff just to be reinfested from work?

    very fustrating

    please advise

    Adele

  28. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Mon Jun 9 2008 15:58:11
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    Adele,

    I understand that you're using vikane and don't want to risk reinfesting yourself. I can't support self-treating a workplace. You could get in trouble or even cause someone health problems. (Just as an example, I understand people with compromised immune systems such as those undergoing cancer treatment, might have problems if exposed to pesticides. Do you want to be responsible for this? Can you be certain no one is in those circumstances?)

    I would recommend two FAQs:

    One, here, tells you how to catch a bed bug sample:
    http://bedbugger.com/2008/02/18/how-to-catch-a-bed-bug-how-to-detect-bed-bugs/

    The trap recommended by Sean (with a handwarmer in the center of a glue trap) works for 11 hours and is something you could set up every night as you leave work, and eventually you may catch a sample.

    Another, in the travel section: http://bedbugger.com/faqs/travel
    explains how to avoid spreading bed bugs. I would take precautions at work to avoid bringing bed bugs to car (if relevant) or home, just until you are able to find a sample at work or otherwise convince your boss to treat.

    Are you positive you saw a bed bug at work? I ask because people often mistake other insects for bed bugs. It is normal to be hyperaware of insects when you're going through this, and many have made this mistake. It would, of course, be a good thing if you did.

    Thankfully, though we all worry about it, most people seem to avoid infesting cars and workplaces.

  29. Adele

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    Posted 11 years ago
    Mon Jun 9 2008 21:33:42
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    Nobugs - thank you for continuing to take the time to respond

    to answer your question - yes I am certain - they were all over my mouse pad several weeks ago - unfortunately I was so freaked out that I threw it out - big mistake because now the maintanence company is skeptical.

    I met with the manager of the comapny yesterday to let them know that I am not a kook - but someone who was unfortunately very severely affected by these things. I moved out of my condo in January - which I sold and put ALL of my belongings into a storgae locker - pretty much unsealed. but i did not know better - I did not know about bedbugs - those were things that happened to "other" people - not to me. Very very wrong

    long story short - i pulled my stuff out of storage about a month later and nearly EVERYTHING i owned came back infested wiht these miserable creatures.

    of course I knew it right away - the hundred bites i got in the first week did told me all I needed to know

    the problem was that since I was in a new apartment that was fairly new there were no traditional signs of them. So the exterminators kept on telling me that there were no bugs there - even though I showed them the bites. that of course ompounded the problem

    I took my stuff in for drycleaning and it STILL came back infested (yes i did tell the dry cleaner) so it really was a comedy of errors that was truly not funny

    I think if I knew how dangerous these creatures were I would have vikaned immediatele but again the exterminators were telling me it was all in my head

    it wasn't until the dog came in and confirmed my suspicians that I knew that I was in serious trouble

    anyway - that's my story - I suppose we all have them - but I got the bugs from a storage locker and they hit me like a nuclear bomb and nearly ruined my life

    that's also how I infested my car - stuff went from the storage locker into my car and the bugs went with it

    that's also how I know that I infested my office - those things were in all of my clothes, shoes and bags. and as I mentioned - I saw them on my mousepad there

    in any case I understand that "most people" can avoid infesting their cars and offices but I could not. so there it is

    I also understand your point about not exposing other people to pesticides - but i don't want to expose them to bedbugs either

    And as you know those traps are notoriously ineffective - the only real way to know is the dog. ive suggested the dog before and they did not want to go with it - I think I shall press the management company on it and see what they say

    in the meantime i threw out the phone at work and sprinkled foodgrade DE powder by my desk (no pesticides in that stuff) and it was a bit better today

    I will ask them to exterminate again by my desk and see what they say

    i hope and pray for the best

    Adele

  30. crazyinsc

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Jul 11 2014 20:44:38
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    Hi as far as vikane and plastic. ...what about dvds? Should I get rid of the cases? Or just open them up?

  31. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Jul 11 2014 21:39:17
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    crazyinsc - 52 minutes ago  » 
    Hi as far as vikane and plastic. ...what about dvds? Should I get rid of the cases? Or just open them up?

    Hi crazyinsc,

    You should ask your Vikane provider. They should give detailed directions and if everything isn't covered, feel free to ask.

    Remember the warranty (if any) depends on you following their instructions, so even if someone here was told something else, that may not be appropriate in your case.


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