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Allergic Reaction to Mites? Beetles? Bed Bugs?

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  1. smx9842

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Fri Nov 30 2018 1:17:28
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    Hi,

    I am reaching out in desperation after several weeks of torture not knowing what is going on. Every 2-3 weeks starting from early October, I have suffering a few hive/itchy bites randomly on my body (sometimes I do not notice until midway through the day, so I'm not sure they are happening at night really). Went to nurse told it could be bed bugs. No visual signs at all on my mattress/couch... I check like every five seconds at this point. I have found a few bugs, one of which was crawling on my bed. An inspector has now come three times to look and told me there is no signs of bed bugs, although they told me the bug found on my bed was a Saw Tooth Grain Beetle (I have seen multiple, although I don't keep many grains around).
    Went to doctors given it is still going on and they said I could be having an allergic reaction to mites given the welts although its rare. Given how spread out these bites have been, no visual signs of spots/casings, could I be allergic to the beetles? Mites? Or am I just being optimistic? I cannot shake the feeling I have bed bugs.

    Someone please help

  2. smx9842

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Fri Nov 30 2018 1:38:47
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    I must add the initial bites on my neck area (early October) were very noticeable. Thought I was having an allergic reaction to food or something at first. Went away, and about two weeks later got one or two more hives (that later turned into welts) on my elbow and back. Two weeks later, wrist. A bit later upper stomach. These seems like areas that bed bugs bite at which is why I am still so stuck on it despite the lack of physical evidence.

  3. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Fri Nov 30 2018 1:54:23
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    Hi,

    If you search for the “bite primer” you will see why symptoms are not the best direction to approach this from.

    The good news is the lack of signs during visual inspection and the fact that some of the reaction locations are highly unlikely for bed bugs.

    I would suggest you monitor for bed bugs but keep an open mind and seek alternative answers rather than focusing on invisible bed bugs because the chances are you will only delay getting to the actual cause.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  4. loubugs

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Fri Nov 30 2018 6:48:01
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    This year seems to be the one for saw-toothed grain beetle (in some cases merchant grain beetle). Both species of Oryzaephilus are stored product pests of various food items. Here's a little bit of information:

    O. surinamensis is one of the most commonly encountered insects in grain, pet foods, and seeds. The saw–toothed grain beetle is found all over the world. It is a pest of a variety of stored foods including cereals, cereal-based products, but also copra, spices, nuts and dried fruit. Both adults and larvae feed on externally on maize grains. They are unable to feed on undamaged grains. Both adults and larvae may feed on grain dust and larvae preferentially fed on the germ. Affects oats (beetle is most often found here), wheat, barley, animal feed, flax, sunflower. Affects milled and processed products, dried fruit, packaged foods. It doesn’t fly.

    O. mercator is one of the most commonly encounter pests in grain and grain products, and will feed on any foodstuffs of vegetable origin. Broken grain kernels are the principal food source but whole kernels may be penetrated and fed on. Prefers foods with high oil content such oatmeal, bran, rolled oats, brown rice. Will also feed on processed cereals, dried fruit, seeds. Feeds on flour, cake mixes, pasta, cookies, nuts, coconut, puffed rice, pet food. It has wings and is able to fly.

    In both species, feeding results in shrinkage of the dry mass of the infested product and in increased water content due to the metabolic activity of the insects which can result in mold growth. The resultant mold can be attractive to other insects as well.

    Rodent caches of food can be infested plus rodent baits are food with toxicant. These insect species feed on these items.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  5. smx9842

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Fri Nov 30 2018 10:56:27
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    Thank you both so much fro your response. Lou or David, to your knowledge, can a person be getting welt/hive-like marks from these beetles? And would you be able to confirm that what was crawling in my sheets is indeed one of these beetles and not a bed bug? Thanks again

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/166418136@N06/45393687274/in/dateposted-public/

    I have also seen a couple of what I think to be spider beetles hanging around. If I can find a photo I will upload that to confirm as well.

    It's a bit smushed but: https://www.flickr.com/photos/166418136@N06/45393810044/in/dateposted-public/

  6. BigDummy

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Fri Nov 30 2018 11:50:30
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    smx9842 - 53 minutes ago  »  And would you be able to confirm that what was crawling in my sheets is indeed one of these beetles and not a bed bug?

    Definitely not a bed bug.

  7. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Fri Nov 30 2018 12:19:05
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    Hi,

    Yes it’s a grain beetle.

    Second is a shiner spider beetle which although they are not normally associated with “biting” people have been associated with skin reactions in a similar fashion to carpet beetles , I.e. the dead body parts and almost certainly the hairs cause a puncture to the skin and thus an immune reaction that looks like a bit.

    I would look at the simple CB advice and follow that before assuming this is bed bug related.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

  8. loubugs

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    Posted 11 months ago
    Sat Dec 1 2018 16:17:15
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    bed-bugscouk - 1 day ago  » 
    Hi,
    Yes it’s a grain beetle.
    Second is a shiner spider beetle which although they are not normally associated with “biting” people have been associated with skin reactions in a similar fashion to carpet beetles , I.e. the dead body parts and almost certainly the hairs cause a puncture to the skin and thus an immune reaction that looks like a bit.
    I would look at the simple CB advice and follow that before assuming this is bed bug related.
    Hope that helps.
    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    First, very small beetle, might be a minute brown scavenger beetle (family Latridiidae), one associated with moisture and damp conditions and mold. These conditions can be within walls so you are only seeing those individuals that come out into the open. You should set your phone/camera to largest picture size and highest resolution in order to get a good picture. The image breaks up too soon to get a good look at it. It could be a grain pest, but the relative length of the elytra is long compared to that of the stored food product beetle such Oryzaephilus species (family Silvanidae). The other beetle (member of family Ptinidae) is a species of Gibbium, the actual species depends on the collection place such as country. There are 2 most commonly encountered: New world would be G. aequinoctiale and old world would be G. psylloides. Common names include shiny spider beetle, smooth spider beetle or hump beetle.
    David and I have had conversations about the urticating qualities of spider beetles, spider beetle larvae. There are urticating issues with immature (larvae) individuals of species of the Dermestidae family, some commonly called carpet beetles. There are different hairs (hastisetae and spicisetae) present on their bodies. Hastisetae are defensive and are spear-headed; spicisetae are elongate and can break easily. Most cases are urticaria occur with the hastisetae. Spider beetle larvae don't have these setae, so there are no hairs that puncture our skin. There can be some reaction to broken down (dusts), dried bodies of these beetles or of others that occur in the home, but you have not yet found. Carpet beetles can be very common in homes, but somewhat elusive, so dusts and setae can be blown about by air currents and land on the skin.


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