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After 4 Months, I FINALLY Found Them! Not Where I Expected, Either!

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  1. bbugophobic

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Dec 1 2010 20:29:42
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    Longish post :-).

    Late last night, I was reading in bed. The light from my e-reader was shining on the open end of my pillowcase, and out of the corner of my eye, I saw movement. I sat up and slowly turned the device in that direction (using it as a makeshift flashlight), and then I saw the unmistakeable outline of a bug moving inside my pillowcase! Now, my pillows have been encased and the zippers taped up since we first found our infestation. I even ran our pillows through the PackTite last week for good measure.

    I slowly sat up in an effort not to scare the bug off - I wanted to catch it. I lightly tapped my sleeping hubby and whispered "wake up and turn on the light". Well, this behavior must have come as a result of his time in the Marine Corps, but whenever this man is awakened from a sound sleep, he jumps up gracelessly and on high alert saying "what's wrong, what's wrong?!". Anyway, we put the pillow into the bathtub, and stood by with alcohol ready to spray any critter that had the misfortune to get shaken out. Guess what? NOTHING! I'm thinking in all the commotion, that bug hightailed it out of there. Pillows were bagged and trashed for good measure.

    Fast forward to this evening. I'm perplexed as I've eliminated nearly every possible bug hiding place near the bed. Bed frame has been steamed multiple times, treated with a thin layer of DE, and all cracks, voids, and screws caulked for good measure. The baseboards were recently dusted with DE and caulked. The box spring and mattress have been double encased with zippers taped for months. No pictures above the bed. Factor in four PCO treatments, and the only signs I've ever had prior to last night were fecal stains on pillows and near head of bed on the sheets.

    I decided to remove and wash linens, and happened to press down on the top mattress encasement (vinyl) on my hubby's side of the bed. Looks like fecal stains EVERYWHERE between the top encasement and the bottom! How can this be? The zipper is taped! Are they still getting out somehow? Decided to take another look and the tape on the encasement zipper. Lo and behold, I think I see gaps! I can't believe they've been in bed with us the WHOLE TIME!!! Of course, no amount of pesticide will kill them if they don't cross it to get to us.

    Anyway, I'll be adding another 2-3 layers of duct tape to the encasement zippers tonight.

    I do have a question, though? Has anyone else discovered that they were living in the bed under the encasements? PCOs, have any of you ever seen this? Is it common?

  2. KillerQueen

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Dec 1 2010 21:22:57
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    You poor thing! Thats why they call them bed bugs! Why are you still going at this 4 treatments later?

    To answer the question, I have seen bugs trapped under encasements when they are put on before they are eliminated from the bed. If the mattress and box spring are not steamed and or treated correctly to exterminate them this will happen. As in all cases I see, the bed is always 70-80% of the problem ... the easy part if you know you have to bring the fight to the bed to knock off that much of the problem. The other 20 or 30% is the difficult part, and where most guys fail if they don't hunt down these areas and treat them accordingly to kill bugs on contact.

    Urban hunter, seek and destroy, I always say! What's next?

  3. scaredsilly

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Dec 1 2010 21:30:36
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    I can't say I have seen them do this, but I seriously suspect this is my issue. I steamed my bed frame twice and placed Drione, Phantom, and last month I was so upset I sprayed the frame with Propoxur (Don't do it!) I am getting more bites this month than last month, have blood stains in the sheets, had a black fecal stain, and this morning found a cast skin on my comforter (which was recently baked in a hot dryer.) My pillows are packtighted and encaseed and heat treated weekly.
    So... I ordered new encasements. I am thinking what you are thinking. My last effort this weekend will be to re-steam the metal frame, mattress, and boxspring then spray with Phantom and put the new encasements on the bed. If this doesn't work I'm tossing the freaking bed no matter what hubby says. Sorry you are dealing with this. I bought new Protect a Bed encasements. Maybe you might want to try those. You can see an interesting video that talks about leaking encasements on Youtube.

    [+] Embed the videoGet the Flash Videos

  4. bbugophobic

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Dec 1 2010 21:59:30
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    KQ - Still suffering because you are not my PCO :wink:. The landlord's PCO is officially awful! I've given him the benefit of the doubt, but he has yet to inspect anything. Only sprays around. Get this - this last time he claims he used gentrol and something called tempest (although I don't see any residual). Looked it up and tempest is listed as a termiticide. Have you had any experience with this as a treatment option? I'm skeptical. I have no idea what's next. I CANNOT personally open that encasement, and go after these things! Just don't have the right stuff. LOL!

    Look for a PM from me!

    scaresilly - I'm trying to avoid tossing the bed. Your case does sound a lot like mine. I actually had more expensive encasements on first (not Protect-a-Bed), but they ripped, so I put the cheap vinyl on top. Both zippers are taped. I hate these bugs!

  5. bbugophobic

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Dec 1 2010 22:02:13
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    Oh, and imagine my surprise KQ when I found them in the bed of all places. Must stop overthinking things :-).

  6. scared-girl

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Dec 1 2010 22:22:11
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    I have seen bugs trapped under encasements when they are put on before they are eliminated from the bed. If the mattress and box spring are not steamed and or treated correctly to exterminate them this will happen. As in all cases I see, the bed is always 70-80% of the problem.

    wait... i thought one of the benefits of encasing was to also trap any inside so they could die off. Is this not true? Is it bad to trap BBs inside encasements?

  7. bbugophobic

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Dec 1 2010 22:31:43
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    scared-girl, I think the idea is that they will eventually die off if left in the encasements and deprived of a food source for a very long time. The problem arises when there is even a tiny breach through which they can pass and breed *shivers* while going virtually undetected by a non-reactor like me.

  8. scared-girl

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Dec 1 2010 22:44:54
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    ohhh. hmm... i wasn't here when the PCO came over... god, i hope he checked everything closely. I don't ever want to take off the encasements!

  9. nycyn

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 2:47:59
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    Interesting, informative post. Thanks.

    And I'm sorry for the troubles you are having.

  10. so unsettling

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 3:26:11
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    To answer the question, I have seen bugs trapped under encasements when they are put on before they are eliminated from the bed. If the mattress and box spring are not steamed and or treated correctly to exterminate them this will happen.

    A lot of us can't exterminate them from the bed; the best we can do is keep them trapped up until they die. That is the reason we were admonished to put the encasements on in the first place. I appreciate the info you provide here, KQ, but your every post tells us that you are just about the only PCO in America who knows how to find and get rid of these things. The rest of us might as well hang it up. It makes me wish I lived in that infested bughole NYC so I could use your services.

  11. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 7:15:00
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    Hi,

    Sorry to say this but this is one of the reasons why I say treat don't encase.

    This is a clear case where the PCO should have been more thorough in their treatment and not rushed in with some add on sales.

    I would suggest that you show the building management the situation and have them seek more appropriate assistance in the issue.

    Encasements should encase and create a barrier where no bedbugs can get out. This has clearly not worked in this occasion. They will however have no preventative benefits on an infestation and bedbugs will happily live in the layer between the mattress and base of the bed.

    This area should always been inspected during treatment visits as to be frank it’s an obvious location of bedbugs to occupy.

    Sadly we are still a long way from having good consumer quality standards for bedbug control despite the fact that there is a clear need for them, I would also suggest that you check to see if the products used are legal and “on” label in your area.

    Sorry to hear of an ongoing case that should have been resolved.

    Best wishes.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    I am happy to answer questions in public but will not reply to message sent directly or via my company / social media. I am here to help everyone and not just one case at a time.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about pro
  12. toledo

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 8:35:33
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    I think this is a case where encasements didn't work, but I still hold out hope that they can work. What brand were you using, phobic?

  13. bugnut

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 8:56:09
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    I have 2 encasements on my boxspring - it was treated first then put them on - one on the mattress. No issues - guess I have been lucky. I did not see them in the box but treated anyway!

  14. bbugophobic

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 10:21:30
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    Hi,

    The original brand used on the mattress is the one sold by Bed, Bath & Beyond. Allerease, or something? I noticed some large seams in this after using it for a while, so I added another encasement on top of this one. The zippers on both were taped. Each time we have a treatment, we have to remove the mattress and box from the frame so the PCO can spray. Each time, I inspect the encasements for rips/holes and duct tape those.

    David, the dark stains can be seen on top of the mattress, between the two encasements. The outside one is translucent vinyl, and everything looks fine to the naked eye. It's only when you press down on the encasement, that the fecal staining underneath can be seen. I hope I'm explaining this correctly. The bugs are not between the mattress and the box spring, they are between the two mattress encasements, like they've been going in and out all along. The only way into the mattress encasement is through the zipper, which was duct taped. Mind you, the mattress itself showed no signs of bugs prior to original encasement. They must have gotten in there since then. This is the biggest concern for me. It must have been through the zipper.

    As for the pesticides used, I've asked and was only given the product literature booklets for gentrol and one other (can't remember which). I thought I should have received a report of exactly what was used after each treatment. I'll ask the LL if they have it. The PCO SAID that he's used gentrol, phantom, tri-di ?(dust), demand, bedlam, and tempest. Honestly, I don't know what's in that tank.

  15. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 10:24:19
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    Hi,

    Its not 100% clear where you mean. Please take a picture and post a link or if you don't want to post publically I can PM you an email address.

    David

  16. toledo

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 13:37:12
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    I think I understand the problem. You have two mattress encasements. The first one ripped, so you put a second over it. Even though both zippers were taped. You can see the fecal stains under the outer encasement, but suspect the bugs are still getting out through gaps in tape/zipper. I hope you have the box spring encased, too. If you really don't want to go out and get a new mattress, I think you've got to add a third encasement or get some new tape and try to get a better seal over the zipper.
    I'm using Allergy Luxe encasements from Bed Bath and Beyond and they seem a little thicker that most. My PCO has been moving my mattresses and boxsprings for treatment. I'm really worried about the way they "throw" it around.

  17. so unsettling

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 16:34:09
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    Oh, Killer Queen, I just reread this thread and my post. It came out all wrong--what I meant to write was that so many of the posts I read here indicate that you are highly successful in treating effectively, as evidenced by what many of your clients write. And it seems like many apartment PCOs are not able to really get rid of them, as evidenced by many other posts. When I reread my post, it sounded rude and obnoxious. It was 3 am. I hope I did not offend you! Didn't realize how it sounded until I looked back.

  18. SearchandDestroy

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 17:28:25
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    Wait, I'm confused. I still can't tell where the bugs were hiding...? Were they on bed and getting out of the encasement via the zipper or were they between the box and top mattress hanging out ON TOP of the encasement?

    If it's the first one..that's amazing. Does your zipper have the allergy zip where it has material behind it so when you zip, it's really sealed. I would imagine an "allerease" encasement would have that special zipper too?? Please clarify...hard to follow. In any case, glad you found them!!

  19. so unsettling

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 18:02:03
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    Bbugophobic--do you mean that the bugs were between the encased box spring and encased mattress--in that area where one rests on the other? And I assume your pillow case is over the pillow encasement? If I am reading your post correctly, they are in areas where they could still be found even if everything was encased. The bugs can still get ON the bed, although not INSIDE the mattress, box spring, and pillow if these are properly encased, zippered, and have no tears. The encasements don't protect the top of the bed areas--they can still get on them, from us or anything we place on the bed. Or anything that is too near it--an end table resting against it, a cord for an electical appliance which rubs against the bed, from pajamas we wear, from us if they were on us when we climbed in. And some say they might drop from the ceiling when they find no other way--yuck.

    If they got on the bed in any of these ways, they might harbor there in big crawl space where the bed and box spring meet. I check it all the time, try to ensure against bringing them into the bed with me, and never put anything on the or near it. The encasements only protect internal areas. They are limited in keeping the bugs away from US.

    Still, I am surprised they would harbor there. it seems like our movement would deter them. I check all the time and don't see anything, but I still think they could get on the bed and simply drop to the floor (i have climb ups) after they are done with me. They can find numerous ways to get on the bed--it's just with hope and a prayer that I encased.

  20. so unsettling

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 18:27:24
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    Oh, Bbugophobic, I reread your later post. I see it is more complicated than I thought. I wish I could help, but honestly have no idea. I hope you find a solution.

  21. parakeets

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 18:41:10
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    I would not trust duct tape. I had a tear in my vinyl box spring cover. I put duct tape on it. The bed bugs were able to come out, even under the duct tape. They are very thin and can slither and squeeze through the space between the duct tape and the mattress cover. I've heard they can also slip under tape when you tape the bed legs. I'd suggest you use another mattress cover over the ones you already have.

  22. SearchandDestroy

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 18:54:43
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    My PCO said to use a hair dryer over the duct tape for a few minutes to melt the glue and really get it stuck to the fabric. Seemed like a good idea...

  23. KillerQueen

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 19:53:57
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    so unsettling - 3 hours ago  » 
    Oh, Killer Queen, I just reread this thread and my post. It came out all wrong--what I meant to write was that so many of the posts I read here indicate that you are highly successful in treating effectively, as evidenced by what many of your clients write. And it seems like many apartment PCOs are not able to really get rid of them, as evidenced by many other posts. When I reread my post, it sounded rude and obnoxious. It was 3 am. I hope I did not offend you! Didn't realize how it sounded until I looked back.

    I didn't have a problem or see anything wrong with what you wrote =)

    To answer the question about "locking bugs inside" the encasement; That is not why I use them. I will kill everything inside the box spring and on the surface of the mattress before I encase them. Yes, a bug can hide inside the mattress and that bug I will have no choice but to trap inside because I can't see or hit it on the first or possibly second treatment.. I like the use of encasements because at that point I don't need to chemically treat the bed you sleep on. But I will not allow an encasement that has trapped bugs inside to be the deciding factor of a treatment success. If the encasement rips the problem continues and the treatment fails.

    90% of the time when I see bed already encased before treatment, its ripped. The box spring im talking about, and thats where the bugs are going to be most of the time .. in the box spring. There are a few simple steps you need to take before you encase your box spring. It's been covered before in other threads. If you don't take the steps mentioned, your box spring encasement and investment will be pointless.

    So in short .. I use encasements more for monitoring the activity after a treatment and to also lock bugs out .... not in.

  24. bbugophobic

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Dec 2 2010 22:47:53
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    Toledo, that is absolutely right! The stains are between the outer vinyl encasement on the mattress and the one under this that was ripped (thus prompting us adding another). I have not found any bugs or signs between the mattress and box spring.

    The box spring is also encased twice with both zippers taped, but every time the PCO comes to treat and we have to move it, I always find new tears, which we tape.

    Actually, prior to encasing the box spring, we steamed it and lightly sprinkled with food-grade DE. I've never seen any signs on the box spring or under the box spring encasements. All of these issues are occurring only on the MATTRESS.

    You know, I wish I'd hired KQ when he came out for the initial inspection. I wanted to follow the proper channels and give my landlord's PCO a chance. I won't make that mistake again.

    so unsettling, my pillowcase was over my encased pillow (with taped zippers) when I saw the bug moving inside. When we dumped the pillow out of the case and shook it out, the bug was gone. This prompted my search for where it could have gone so quickly, which led to my discovery of the stains under the mattress encasement.

    SearchandDestroy, the hairdryer idea seems like a good one. May have to try it.

    Thanks for all the feedback, folks. It's really helped.

  25. ItchyinAstoria

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Dec 4 2010 1:52:12
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    I have a reasonable amount of faith in my Protect a Bed encasements. Years ago, I messed around with some vinyl crap from BBB. I am pretty sure it did just about nothing. Maybe I'm easily impressed, but it seems like the Protect a Bed folks thought very hard about the design to avoid things like needing to tape up your zippers (which, as you witnessed, is not a perfect solution).

    I'm surprised you never saw them before now if they were right there on the bed. I have always found them pretty quickly after having been bitten if I look long enough (usually 10-15 minutes of peering around under blankets and sheets will turn up the offending bug), but I'm a) very sensitive to bites so my skin reacts almost immediately and b) blessed with good eyesight and c) deeply paranoid. Also a very light sleeper.

  26. bbugophobic

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Dec 4 2010 8:53:19
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    Hi Itchy,

    Yeah, lesson learned the hard way about the encasements. Because of the doubling and the taping, when I would see new fecal stains on my sheets, I just assumed that they must be living in the frame, under baseboards, in chair next to bed, etc. - anywhere but the mattress or box spring. I inspected those areas thoroughly.

    I'm pretty surprised it took so long to find them too. Of course, I am pretty much a non-reactor, so unfortunately I can't use that as a clue.

    I don't think I'll ever place that much faith in any encasement again. Luckily, our new and most awesome PCO will be in next week. Part of the plan is to remove the encasements, kill and treat, and then re-encase. Pretty sure he'll be using the Protect-A-Bed product.

  27. ItchyinAstoria

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sat Dec 4 2010 9:06:14
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    Well, if you don't react, yeah, I'd say it would be pretty hard to find them. It's not just that I have a physical signal that lets me know they're in the area, but it's effin' ITCHY so I have a deep motivation to seek out and punish the things.

    I've also been known to lie awake for an hour in the middle of the night staring at the ceiling in search of a mosquito, but I find it very hard to sleep knowing one is in the room (at least mosquitos are kind enough to do that whining buzz sound.... though being awoken by that sound in your ear triggers in me an almost panicked response.) I. Hate. Mosquitoes. Maybe more than bed bugs. Bed bugs are disturbing and hard to get rid of, mosquitoes carry diseases that kill people.

  28. AbugMess

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun Dec 5 2010 15:49:11
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    Agh I get more and more terrified when I read the posts. Not that that is a bad thing, it's a good thing because I am learning so much. Still, i'm terribly nervous about our mattress now. Should we just throw it out?
    I've thrown out most of my bedroom furniture. Mostly for peace of mind. I'm sick, I know. Still, we had a fairly new $1500 mattress and I couldn't bear to throw it out because it's so comfortable. That being said, it's not quite so comfortable now that we covered it in plastic.
    We could not find a king siz mattress cover here in Germany, so we vacuumed it, went over it with a hair dryer, then wrapped it in a couple layers of heavy duty construction plactic and sealed it with duct tape. The PCO is coming tomorrow for the first time.
    Honestly, if it wouldn't break us to throw the mattress out, should we? I just cringe atr bringing a new one in to be infested. Thanks for any input!

  29. KillerQueen

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun Dec 5 2010 18:17:05
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    Keep your mattress .. a good PCO will be able to save just about anything you own. That is unless you have 30,000 bugs in the room =).

    The box spring and bed frame are the real problem area so make sure they pay attention to those areas as well. I don't know the treatment methods they use in your neck of the woods but it still shouldn't be a problem.

    Good Luck!! KQ

  30. scaredsilly

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Dec 6 2010 20:10:40
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    Today upon inspection, i found the encasement was a HUGE part of the problem, if not all. When I flipped back the mattress and began steaming over the Mattress Safe encasement, there were about 20 live bugs adult bugs inside. These were not there last month or the month before that!!! One had just fed and when I steamed it, red blood splashed out inside of the encasement. I really can not make this stuff up. I believe that the encasement has been letting out nymphs for some time and also I strongly believe that the adults have been feeding through the encasement. It is really important that the PCO treat well first and then place the best encasements on, or toss the bed.

  31. AbugMess

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Dec 7 2010 5:37:01
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    We ended up tossing the mattress yesterday. Not because I didn't think the PCO could handle it, but I was worried I'd have nightmares.
    My husband and I basically asked ourselves: Are we ever going to want to remove the plastic? Will we ever be comfortable laying on this mattress knowing what was in there?

    And the answer was no. So we are currently on an extra large, high, blow up mattress. Actually, I'm sleeping better just knowing there are not bugs inside it. We will still watch it, we have the tape, etc. and see how it works. I refuse to spend money on a new bed or mattress until I feel comfortable that we have sorted through our BB problem.

  32. bugdhunter

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Dec 7 2010 20:27:24
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    I know exactly how you feel, since this was finally discovered a month ago, I have thrown away my entire bedroom set, blankets, comforters, and my 2 year old $1100 couches. I'd never be comfortable using any of it again. Now, with hardly anything we want to move, but I'm afraid to cuz I dont want to take any stragglers with us. I'm hoping the Allergy Sentry Mattress encasements work like their price reflects for both of my daughters' beds.... maybe someday this won't be an obsession anymore

  33. bbugophobic

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Dec 7 2010 21:15:36
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    scaredsilly, I'm happy you found them. It seems that there is always some new threat or potential infestation point with these things! What kind of encasements are you using? Did you have your zippers taped as well?

  34. scaredsilly

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Dec 7 2010 21:28:08
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    bbugophobic, I used Mattress Safe because it was included with my PCO's treatment. Even though the zipper has a hook to keep it closed, I did have duct tape over the end for safety. Now I am just stressed because I didn't realize I was raising a farm in my own bed! (And they were possibly spreading.. there is fecal in night stand and bed frame that wasn't there upon last inspection). Ugh! I feel like calling the manufacturer, but I don't want to take the encasements off in order to prove my point. I did take pictures though.

  35. bbugophobic

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Dec 7 2010 21:41:17
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    scaredsilly, I feel the same way. My infestation was caught way early, because I was vigilant. Despite my better judgment, I hoped that the landlord's PCO could take care of it. These past four months, I've done nothing but provide them a nice cozy home in my encasements. I'm also wondering if they've spread. Ditching the landlord's PCO - they had their chance.

    I feel that some of these manufacturers are snowing us, and not adequately testing their products before labeling them "bedbug proof". I hope that the Protect-A-Bed product works as advertised.

    Silver lining: KQ is treating tomorrow, so I'll rest a little easier tonight.

  36. AbugMess

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Wed Dec 8 2010 3:00:53
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    Bugdhunter- We are in a similar situation. The entire beautiful dark wood bedroom collection has gone.
    I believe we caught the infestation early enough they haven't spread from our room. We are taking every precaution in every other room as well though, minus throwing the furniture out.
    We had our first PCO treatment Monday, and have seen two live BB in our room, but no other evidence of them and no new bites.
    We wrote down the place where we saw the two live ones and our 2nd PCO treatment is 20 Dec.
    I hope we are doing everything we can to eliminate spreading them without having to stop living all together

  37. smoosh

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Apr 22 2011 23:07:44
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    I just got done reading through this entire thread and am now completely freaked out. I have those dang Bed Bath & Beyond encasements on my bed too - I put them on long before we had any bed bug problem (just began 2 weeks ago). Going to order the Protect-A-Bed ones in a few minutes!

  38. jrbtnyc

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Sep 8 2011 15:58:15
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    scaredsilly - 9 months ago  » 
    Today upon inspection, i found the encasement was a HUGE part of the problem, if not all. When I flipped back the mattress and began steaming over the Mattress Safe encasement, there were about 20 live bugs adult bugs inside. These were not there last month or the month before that!!! One had just fed and when I steamed it, red blood splashed out inside of the encasement. I really can not make this stuff up. I believe that the encasement has been letting out nymphs for some time and also I strongly believe that the adults have been feeding through the encasement. It is really important that the PCO treat well first and then place the best encasements on, or toss the bed.

    [Emphasis added.]

    Yeow!

    Any updates on that lately? In this post from last December, am I understanding correctly that scaredsilly was saying bugs could feed *through* the material of a Mattress Safe encasement.

    That seems like the only way 20 well-fed, recently-fed, adult bed bugs could be living *inside* the encasement. Even if nymphs might be able to squeeze in and out through a zipper or wherever, presumably adults, especially fat just-fed ones, couldn't possibly do that.

    So isn't that presumably something which ought to be of concern to the manufacturer and to their entire clientele, since it means this major brandname product is useless?

    Shouldn't everyone be alerted to that problem so they can stop buying Mattress Safe encasements until that defect is corrected?

    And have there been any reports of that problem existing with the Protect-A-Bed brand encasements? Or put another way, has it been confirmed the problem *doesn't* exist with that brand?

    Any specialists who raise bed bugs could pretty easily test the material used in either the Mattress Safe brand or the Protect-A-Bed brand, I would think, by seeing if bugs can feed through the material substituted for the usual gauze the specialists feed the bugs through.

  39. Rosae

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Sep 8 2011 17:19:15
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    I think I would put a molton sheet over the encasement to protect it. I don't know if all countries know this fabric (maybe under a different name) but here it's very common. Everyone has a molton over his mattress here (a half cm thick very soft cotton felt fabric that can be washed very hot, the more you wash it the better it gets).

    There are also moltons with a waterproof underlay. They are around € 15 for a double bed with elastic corners.

    http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRGaLTrtQGEbGUaAXOxuuP-AG25CEZA6Qwyj3BbISFzZXuC_yTuNayOZ_in

  40. jrbtnyc

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Sep 8 2011 18:14:19
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    Rosae - 46 minutes ago  » 
    I think I would put a molton sheet over the encasement to protect it. I don't know if all countries know this fabric (maybe under a different name) but here it's very common. Everyone has a molton over his mattress here (a half cm thick very soft cotton felt fabric that can be washed very hot, the more you wash it the better it gets).
    There are also moltons with a waterproof underlay. They are around € 15 for a double bed with elastic corners.
    http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRGaLTrtQGEbGUaAXOxuuP-AG25CEZA6Qwyj3BbISFzZXuC_yTuNayOZ_in

    What country is that you're in?

    If I understand correctly, you're saying the extra thickness of the molton would make it impossible for the bugs' probosces, after penetrating up through the encasement fabric, to reach the additional further distance necessary to suck blood from the sleeping humans.

    But isn't there a chance the humans pressing down on the molton by their weight while sleeping would compress it and make that distance shorter, thus allowing the bugs to still feed?

    And, just on the principle of the thing, shouldn't an encasement that's sold as high-end, quality protection against bed bugs be sufficiently impenetrable on its own to block feeding without depending on some additional piece of fabric to be in place?

    Or if it isn't thick enough and the second piece of fabric is required, shouldn't the manufacturers at least *state that in their advertising*?

    Furthermore, if the second piece of fabric is required, then users who wish to augment their bugfighting by personally inspecting their beds will have more to inspect and it will take appreciably more work because they'll have to remove the molton every time they want to do so, and inspect up inside and outside the molton, *plus* inspect the encasement itself, looking for bugs to squish.

    So all else being equal, and in view of the fact that utilizing fabric bugs can't penetrate with their probosces is technically feasible, the encasement really, really in my view ought to use such fabric and not require any assistance in that regard from any other source.

  41. makesmenuts

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Sep 8 2011 18:30:49
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    Ugh, the idea of adult BBs feeding through an encasement is freaking me about! I'm a two encasement person too. I don't know if the first one had holes, but we have cats so we added the second to mattress and box as an added precaution.

    I understand the whole "get rid of the bedding" thing, even though it may be able to be treated. I was so horrified when I saw the harbor between the wood bed and frame, as well as a BB hiding on the mattress just waiting for me, I couldn't stand to ever use it again. We encased the new set as soon as it arrived.

    I hope you manage to get things sorted out. I know how awful that must have been to start the steaming and see those suckers in there, not to mention the blood.

  42. BugsMustDie

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Sep 8 2011 22:28:45
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    While on the subject of encasements, I thought I would pitch in my 2 cents for whatever it's worth:
    Since this post originated, it appears Bed Bath & Beyond may have added to their stock of encasements - although all may not be available at all locations.
    I own 3 different brands. The first, Allergy Luxe, appears to have a lining that will not allow bugs to feed through. In my experience, I have not noticed their ability to feed through this lining, but I have not seen bugs inside either. While I would recommend this brand because it seems very high quality, it did rip, due to careless PCOs "throwing it around" as one user previously noted, in a bed that had a plywood lining.
    The second brand is made by Orkin, which I was not able to find any reviews on. I chose this one because Allergy Luxe did not offer a twin mattress encasement deep enough for my mattress. While I really like their user-friendly design (the sides are stretchy, which makes it easier to put on than others), the material seems very thin and I would not be surprised if bugs could feed through it. This was a spare bed, so we did not notice activity in this bed and can not comment on whether or not they were able to feed through it. But I don't see how they wouldn't be able to feed through it. It's that thin.
    The third is the Sweep brand. I chose this one for my box spring because it was on sale at a % discount. These are usually twice the cost of the other two because they are treated to kill bugs that will rest on them for 48 hours. This material seems similar to the Allergy Luxe, but I don't think it appears quite as strong. Because it is on my box spring, I am less concerned about them feeding through due to their lack of access to a host. I don't know if the treatment actually works since I think my bugs were dead before I actually purchased the encasement. It was added more as a preventative so the box spring would not be infested.


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