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A National Problem/Crisis That's Taken Seriously?

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  1. Dark_Ages

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jul 4 2015 20:25:17
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    Hi, I'm new to the forum. And what I have been wondering about for a quite a while now is what the United States government actually can and can't do about the bed bug epidemic in the United States. Also, I found an interesting article from 2010 that explains the problems with the costs of developing a solution to the bed bug problem:

    http://money.cnn.com/2010/11/05/news/economy/bed_bug_cure/

    However, the article also brings out:

    Then there's the government. The government usually steps in when insects are a threat to health or property. But unlike mosquitoes, bedbugs don't carry diseases. And unlike termites, they won't tear down your house.

    "It's been very, very slow for government agencies to give grants," said Harrison. "If a high ranking politician gets bed bugs, that might change."

    Maybe that's already happened. The Environmental Protection Agency is heading up a recently-created interagency task force focused on the bed bug problem, which according to the National Pest Management Association is present in all 50 states. A congressional bedbug forum is set for November 18.

    But few see a safe, cheap pesticide available anytime soon.

    A "threat to health or property"? Really? Also, I will be starting another thread that gives a different point of view on bed bugs and health.

    But the article also goes on to say:

    It seems that unless someone steps up and develops a new safe, cheap, effective poison -- no matter what the cost -- the bedbug pandemic will only get worse.

    Therefore, with all of this talk about money and costs, etc., I've been wondering about other serious national problems and crisises such as hurricanes, earthquakes, and tornadoes. And yes, in comparison, the bed bug crisis isn't nearly as concentrated and as devastating as the other crisises that I mentioned, however, the problem with the bed bug crisis is that it consists of multiple, isolated, individual crisises that either adversely effect, ruin, or devastate the lives of millions of American families or individuals in a mostly quiet and muted way:

    http://www.alternet.org/story/147848/bed_bug_infestation_is_scaring_millions_of_americans

    Therefore, since the money always comes from somewhere with government help with the more conspicuous national crisises, I don't quite understand why cost and money is a problem with the more quiet and muted bed bug crisis in this country.

    Please share your comments on this topic.

  2. Dark_Ages

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jul 4 2015 20:48:37
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    Serious_National_Problem - 11 minutes ago  » 
    Therefore, with all of this talk about money and costs, etc., I've been wondering about other serious national problems and crisises such as hurricanes, earthquakes, and tornadoes. And yes, in comparison, the bed bug crisis isn't nearly as concentrated and as devastating as the other crisises that I mentioned, however, the problem with the bed bug crisis is that it consists of multiple, isolated, individual crisises that either adversely effect, ruin, or devastate the lives of millions of American families or individuals in a mostly quiet and muted way:
    http://www.alternet.org/story/147848/bed_bug_infestation_is_scaring_millions_of_americans
    Therefore, since the money always comes from somewhere with government help with the more conspicuous national crisises, I don't quite understand why cost and money is a problem with the more quiet and muted bed bug crisis in this country.
    Please share your comments on this topic.

    And from a quote from the linked article above:

    Bedbug infestations at Abercrombie & Fitch, Victoria's Secret and other trendy Manhattan stores last month — and last week in Manhattan's Time Warner Center, home to CNN — cost hundreds of thousands of dollars each in lost sales, furniture, equipment and merchandise, plus the wages of dozens of workers transporting, fumigating and destroying tainted goods. That's just the tip of the iceberg.

    I really don't see too much of a difference between the cost in lost sales, furniture, equipment and merchandise, etc... and the cost in lost property, merchandise, and the economy, etc. in a town devastated by a hurricane or a tornado.

  3. robinsmom

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jul 4 2015 20:52:09
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    Bed bugs employ people. We have become that pathetic as a nation. That's my pov.?'

    I think bed bugs are worse than they let on, I personally suspect they can carry more diseases than they tell us, (show me a blood sucking insect that DOESNT transmit disease), but I'm just a nobody survivor.

    I'm not an expert just a dumb struggling bed bugger like every body else.
  4. Dark_Ages

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jul 4 2015 21:29:40
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    robinsmom - 29 minutes ago  » 
    Bed bugs employ people. We have become that pathetic as a nation. That's my pov.?'

    Yes, the United States is a capitalistic country, and my cynical side tells me that "The Big Business of Battling Bedbugs" may be one of the reasons why no true progress has been made against this problem:

    http://abcnews.go.com/Business/Sleep/big-business-battling-bed-bugs/story?id=11478182

    People are making lots and lots of money from this crisis.

  5. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jul 5 2015 13:31:33
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    Oh my!

  6. robinsmom

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jul 5 2015 16:31:51
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    My apologies for last nights pov. I didn't mean to offend. The pros here are NOT the ones taking advantage of people. My pov is taken from my experiences with a completely inept local pco contracted through a nationally well recognized chain. Same chain that used illegal pesticide gas with tragic results somewhere in the Carribean. Bed bugs are tough but they aren't rocket science, it's just that spray n pray doesn't work, and in my opinion is why bed bugs took over low income high rises, where, in my opinion, the current problem originated. (Not the residents fault mostly, just crappy policies.)

    In my state, bed bugs are not considered "vermin". If this is common it would explain why the issue is treated so shabbily. Vermin is legalese; "vermin" must be dealt with for example, in workplaces or employer can be sued. So unless local ordinances dealing with bed bugs are put into play, a workplace can be infested with bed bugs and workers have only to hope their employer has some morals.

    We need bed bugs to be declared vermin, not just a nuisance, and on a federal scale.


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