Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Bed Bug Treatment

$0 PackTite! (Tip/Trick)

(14 posts)
  1. ridandprevention

    newbite
    Joined: May '17
    Posts: 30

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jun 5 2017 0:18:07
    #



    Login to Send PM

    There was a bed bug problem in the building of my apartment and some got into my apartment. I was planning on moving and even signed the renewal document before the bed bugs made their way in.

    I just recently moved back to my parents' place for two months. I made sure to double/triple/quadruple bag all of my belongings to be as careful as possible (although one seems to have made it out http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/demotivated-and-bad-situation%e2%80%94need-a-bit-of-help?replies=1#post-269939).

    My father has an attic in his garage and it easily gets over 45˚C / 115˚F up there in the summer, for maybe 8-10 hours during the day and sometimes for multiple days in a row. At that temperature and for such long periods of time, it's impossible for bed bugs to survive there.

    So I re-bagged all my already bagged belongings just to be sure and put them there. I'll be leaving them there for multiple months and then everything should be fine. Thinking of buying a thermostat to make sure.

  2. bedbugsbugme

    senior member
    Joined: Dec '16
    Posts: 475

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jun 5 2017 9:46:16
    #



    Login to Send PM

    The core temperature of those bags wouldn't get hot enough to kill everything. You're better off throwing all clothes in the dryer at the laundromat for an hour. Then sealing all non dryables in a big bag and throwing a piece of nuvan strip in for a couple weeks.

    I'm not an expert. Just sharing what I learned from my experience.
  3. Livingagain

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 535

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jun 5 2017 10:41:48
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Good advice @bugme. The non-dryables can be speeded up by putting them in the hot attic while the Nuvan is in them, though.

  4. Richard56

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '10
    Posts: 2,223

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jun 5 2017 11:53:32
    #



    Login to Send PM

    You don't have to guess. Just get a few instant read thermometers with remote probes and place them within the belongings you want to heat. If the belongings reach 120 degrees for 60 minutes then the bed bugs should be dead per Paktite's own recommendation.

    Richard

  5. ridandprevention

    newbite
    Joined: May '17
    Posts: 30

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jun 5 2017 15:15:58
    #



    Login to Send PM

    bedbugsbugme - 5 hours ago  » 
    The core temperature of those bags wouldn't get hot enough to kill everything. You're better off throwing all clothes in the dryer at the laundromat for an hour. Then sealing all non dryables in a big bag and throwing a piece of nuvan strip in for a couple weeks.

    That's the thing. These aren't clothes, they're things like books, electronics, documents, etc. (I'm drying all my clothes at highest temperature for 1h30).,

    That's the best option I've found for non-clothes items.

  6. ridandprevention

    newbite
    Joined: May '17
    Posts: 30

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jun 5 2017 15:30:47
    #



    Login to Send PM

    But even if it doesn't get to the 118˚F for 90 minutes, it's for crazy amounts of time. Say it only gets to 110˚F in the center of the boxes, but for 82 hours total, most of the bed bugs will dry up and die, no?

    118˚F for 90 minutes = 100% mortality
    110˚F for 4920 minutes = chance some not drying up from 82 hours of heat?

  7. BigDummy

    oldtimer
    Joined: Dec '13
    Posts: 4,478

    online

    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jun 5 2017 15:57:43
    #



    Login to Send PM

    You would have a higher mortality rate on the less dense items, like clothing; the challenge would be higher density, natural insulators like paper. A book would take a much longer time to reach lethal temperatures in its core.
    There are too many variables for me personally to use this approach, but I'm sure some folks have had success with this method. Attics tend to be a low airflow area, I've done HVAC work for over a decade, it's hot and stagnant up there. A few fans to move the air around wouldn't be a bad idea if you must go this route.

  8. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 17,791

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jun 5 2017 18:03:07
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    If the Q is tip or trick the answer is Trick.

    It will not work beyond single items on hangers for the same reason why you cant decon in a car when its parked in the Sahara dessert.

    When it comes to thermodynamics the heat sources is critical when it comes to this application.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  9. ridandprevention

    newbite
    Joined: May '17
    Posts: 30

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jun 5 2017 18:08:14
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Well, apparently, leaving items for 8 months to 1 year is almost 100% certain that it will kill all bed bugs, since this is how long they can live without feeding (1 year also being considered high).

    Wouldn't boxes/bags left in very high heat—not the 113˚F-118˚F usually advised, but still very high, such as 100˚F-105˚F throughout the belonging—if left in that heat for say 6-7 months, wouldn't the high temperatures have accelerated the death of the bed bugs?

    Does reasonably high heat (105˚F=110˚F) still cause dehydration for bed bugs and speed up or are a cause of mortality?

  10. ridandprevention

    newbite
    Joined: May '17
    Posts: 30

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jun 5 2017 18:15:38
    #



    Login to Send PM

    bed-bugscouk - 6 minutes ago  » 
    Hi,
    If the Q is tip or trick the answer is Trick.
    It will not work beyond single items on hangers for the same reason why you cant decon in a car when its parked in the Sahara dessert.
    When it comes to thermodynamics the heat sources is critical when it comes to this application.
    Hope that helps.
    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    Didn't understand the riddle, but thanks for the input.

    With thermodynamics, isn't duration of exposure an important factor?

    Say you put something that is insulated in 150˚F water for 45 minutes, the insulated part won't be 150˚F for sure. But if you leave the item say for 10 hours, with constant 150˚F water, wouldn't the insulated part eventually reach something like 145˚F?

  11. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 17,791

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jun 5 2017 19:20:40
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    Here is the paper that illustrates it will not work in direct sun in Australia in a black bag:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17195683

    There are not enough hours in the day for the exposure temperature to be enough to get penetration to the cool spots because of the conductive heating that is occurring.

    A PackTite works on a convective heating system which means the heat is actively delivered through a driven heating process. Even if you use a similar heat source you are not guaranteed results because of how heat penetrates on a localized level.

    All this is before you start to realise the thermal properties of the attic don't allow enough of a temperature differential to build to drive the process as actively as you would need.

    I have spent over 400 hours working on testing systems that work, testing ones that don't and even working on my own designs. To get it to work reliably is a lot harder than it appears.

    Great enthusiasm but when you get into the testing you will see where it fails between air temp and core temps.

    David

  12. ridandprevention

    newbite
    Joined: May '17
    Posts: 30

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jun 5 2017 23:17:24
    #



    Login to Send PM

    bed-bugscouk - 3 hours ago  » 
    Hi,
    Here is the paper that illustrates it will not work in direct sun in Australia in a black bag:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17195683
    There are not enough hours in the day for the exposure temperature to be enough to get penetration to the cool spots because of the conductive heating that is occurring.
    A PackTite works on a convective heating system which means the heat is actively delivered through a driven heating process. Even if you use a similar heat source you are not guaranteed results because of how heat penetrates on a localized level.
    All this is before you start to realise the thermal properties of the attic don't allow enough of a temperature differential to build to drive the process as actively as you would need.
    I have spent over 400 hours working on testing systems that work, testing ones that don't and even working on my own designs. To get it to work reliably is a lot harder than it appears.
    Great enthusiasm but when you get into the testing you will see where it fails between air temp and core temps.
    David

    Hmm, so the hot attic for many hours per day for many weeks probably won't work.

    Do you think, even if the temperature in the boxes/bags don't reach the 113/118˚F needed, that it will speed up the process of them dying?

    I'm not sure how the mechanism works, but do highers temperatures cause dehydration for the bed bugs? Say that, without food/liquids, they'll die in 5 months instead of 8 due to the high temperature?

  13. ridandprevention

    newbite
    Joined: May '17
    Posts: 30

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jun 5 2017 23:19:57
    #



    Login to Send PM

    MODS: Please change the title of the thread to "Very hot attic for many months. Will it work?", since it's a bit of a disappointment for people that read the thread, since it doesn't work. Thanks!

  14. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 17,791

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Tue Jun 6 2017 7:33:23
    #



    Login to Send PM

    ridandprevention - 8 hours ago  » 
    Hmm, so the hot attic for many hours per day for many weeks probably won't work.

    Not without slowing the rotation of the earth to make a single day much longer than 8 - 14 hours of sun light.

    I figure when it comes to the cost of slowing the planets rotation its easier to get a solution that works.

    David


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

293,552 posts in 49,285 topics over 152 months by 21,598 of 22,023 members. Latest: TW20, MyAccountHere, eldina714