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Will heat treatments damage electronics/books/LP's/cd's etc???

(9 posts)
  1. newplagueofBB

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat May 10 2008 14:33:44
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    Hello everyone, I regretfully submit my membership into the BB victim club

    Earlier this week, I found a few BB's (and got some bites) in my apartment and alerted my building manager, who told me that PCO's were actually coming out the next day, so it's obviously a wider problem. When the PCO guys came (Plunketts I believe). They didn't find any in a quick check of bed and couch, but told me everything would have to be heat treated (books/cd's/dvd's/electronics)in a big chamber of theirs. From what I've looked up they have an association with this company below and, and I'm assuming will use something like this product:
    http://www.thermal-remediation.com/index.php?/site/products-detail/heat_treatment_chamber_p800htr/

    This apparently heats up the contents to 120 degrees (I think) for some period of time.

    I'll ask the PCO's, who might be biased for their service, but is anyone here aware of evidence that such heat treatments damage:
    Electronics
    -Computers and related equipment (I'm an Illustrator who uses my computer stuff as part of my work)
    - Music equipment (Guitars, recording gear, cd's & cassettes)
    -TV's
    -Stereos/Turntables

    -Books (LOTS of books, mostly nicer art books, talking 700-800 here.)

    - DVDs/CDs/Vinyl Records of varyious packaging

    This isn't even counting alot of my artwork...

    At this point I'm not even sure who's paying for this as both the building manager and PCO's were kinda vague (sounds pricey though)and I was inches away from a panic attack already, so I didn't ask many questions then.

    Is a close visual inspection/cleaning possible on some items?

    So anyway, thanks for any help/thoughts, and if this is answered in the FAQ or elsewhere, feel free to delete this and point me elsewhere.

    NewPlagueofBB

  2. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat May 10 2008 17:01:08
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    If someone is providing you a service, whether it's thermal (in your case), Vikane gas, or anything else, you must ask THEM what is safe for your stuff, and how to prep so it will be an effective treatment. They must give detailed instructions and only they can tell you.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  3. Scarafaggio

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat May 10 2008 18:00:23
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    Nobugsonme's advice is good. Because there is a specific contractor involved, ask that contractor, and try to get it in writing.

    I will say, however, that I can't imagine why they would want to treat CDs or DVDs. The cases, perhaps; and certainly a DVD player; but in a pest control career that spanned more than 20 years, I never came across bedbugs infesting an optical disk itself, nor do I even believe it's possible. They can infest cassette tapes, backup drive tapes, flash drives, and floppy disks; but how could they infest a CD or DVD? It doesn't seem possible to me (other than maybe, in theory getting under the label if there is one).

    If they will be taking your computer (and presumably your backup media), I suggest you open an account with an online backup company like mozy.com or box.net, and back up all of your data before you let them pry your computer out of your hands.

    -Scarafaggio

  4. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat May 10 2008 18:41:02
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    Scarafaggio,
    I think the DVD and CD cases are the point.

  5. fightorflight

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun May 11 2008 4:51:58
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    I kinda think it's nice that the PCO offers to heat treat your belongings. Seems easier, faster and more reliable than what many folks end up doing with their things. About certain books and definitely artwork, though - is it possible you can seal and store those things for 18 months? Just do without them, rather than risk damaging them?

  6. newplagueofBB

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun May 11 2008 22:56:06
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    Thanks everyone for the replies, the PCO's will indeed be questioned about their process, I just wondered if there was anybody out there with experience of the effects of similar treatments to their belongings, so I can inquire further with the PCO before turning over almost everthing I own. But I'll see how it goes...

    Some art and books and stuff can be sealed up for 18 months, which will be hard.

  7. BakedBedBugs

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Jun 5 2008 0:44:13
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    Yes, heat can damage all of the things mentioned.
    The key is monitoring temperatures and keeping them at safe levels without dropping below the thermal death points of the insects.
    I have safely treated laptops, lcd tv's computers etc. I've also wrecked a couple of items (thankfully they were items that we missed on our pre treatment inspections and not high profile, expensive items).

    Vinyl can almost never be heat treated. Guitars etcs can warp and be ruined or go out of tune.
    The books should be fine, depending on the cover material. If you would leave it in your car in the summer sun safely it should be fine.

    Good luck!
    Tony

  8. Gypsy

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Fri Jun 6 2008 11:08:28
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    Last night, I unpacked some items that hadn't been treated yet, and immediately treated them best I could. Plastic items (plastic all the way through) went into hot boiling water for 10-15 minutes. Some leather items went into boiling water and came out fine. One that was too big for the pot, I placed over the pot and let soak in the steam for 10-15 minutes moving it around so all parts were steamed. I managed to salvage five of my very rare and expensive books. I steamed them over the pot, placed the book on top of the pot for five minutes letting the spine soak in steam, and then fanned the pages over the steam for a few minutes. Then I bagged them in ziploc bags which I will do in between use. The rest of the books, I've left in a sealed box for now until I purchase a new book case and can treat them with steam.

    I will be following this method for some articles of clothing like my bf's kilt and such. Hope this helps. Side note, at this point I don't care whether the pages turn colour or warp a little, as long as the book is still readable and serves it's purpose, maybe give the steam a test run on a book you don't overly care about.

  9. parakeets

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Jun 8 2008 8:45:22
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    I think this would be a nice treatment if you are moving and will never come back to the same place, but even if they take evertying out of your home/unit and heat-treat it, how are they going to get the bedbugs in the floors, walls, baseboards, crown molding, window sills, etc? Bedbugs are not just in "things."

    As for the heat and electronic equipment, the instruction manual often lists a temperature range that is safe for the equipment (and if you don't have the manuals, they are often on the web now, a fantastic benefit). If you wouldn't leave something in a hot car, you might not want to let it be heated to 120 degrees, either.


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