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Why isn't there a full-body protection bag for sleeping?

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  1. pluterfraf

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 14:11:10
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    Given the vastness of the current bedbug epidemic and the rapid advances of technology, why has no one developed a full-body enclosure for temporary safety from bedbug bites? Such an enclosure might consist of a tough and body-sized ziplock bag with a fine screen opening or oxygen tube for breathing. The opening/tube could even be attached to the face like a scuba gear mask. Granted, the plastic material wouldn't be terribly comfortable, but I personally would sacrifice comfort for freedom from worries about the visibility and violation of bites. There are times when people need peace during protracted bedbug battles. People also worry about visible bites jeopardizing their jobs.

    Additional safety precautions might have to be incorporated into the design to prevent accidental suffocation. That shouldn't be a problem, since isolating suits have been used by astronauts and deep sea divers for fifty years. There must be a way of securing the opening to the mouth so that it will remain unblocked during sleep.

    Is there a reason such a body bag can't be made? If it can, it might be of use to a lot of people. I'm thinking of a story an exterminator told me about a 60-year old woman who was hemmed in by 40 years of clutter, was being bitten constantly, and could do nothing about it -- the exterminator had to refuse to treat her apartment, though he felt awful for her. If she were able to wear such a suit, then her golden years might not be sheer torture. I think she deserves a bit of peace, don't you?

  2. losingit

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 14:27:55
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    I really like this idea. It astonishes me how we as humans can be so advanced (or so we like to tell ourselves) yet we can't find a way to eliminate bbs. Like the common cold, there is no real cure...

    While the body suit is a way to keep them from us though we'd also see a drop in the human procreation rate, if you know what I mean:)

    I think the real answer is finding a product similar to the flea treatments or something, we swallow a pill, it dissipates in our blood (harmless to us of course) but poisonous, horrible, guaranteed death to the vampires.

    It's only a matter of time before some bright bb bitten genius invents it.

  3. pluterfraf

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 14:39:24
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    That's a good idea, too, but it won't help sufferers like that 60-year-old lady initially: The bugs would be too numerous to stop biting for some time. Additionally, bedbugs seem more resistant than we are; they remind me of the human-hunting insects in Guillaume Del Toro's Mimic.

    Yes, there should be a permanent solution (like yours) in the future based on biological/chemical entomology research. But what I don't understand is why the body suit can't be made right now. In most cases, bugs can be dealt with as soon as one calls the exterminator -- at worst, with a bit of preparation. But for severe to hopeless cases, and sensitive situations (swimming competitions, modeling jobs, interviews), people should have bags to prevent visible bites, chronic insomnia and damaging emotional stress.

  4. losingit

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 15:00:58
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    The one problem with the suit is it's only suitable for nightime (I guess?). If the bugs in an apt/house are so bad then the chances are the person will be bitten on their couch, easy chair, desk etc.

    The 60 year old woman sounds like she needs some assistance and community help to deal with her infestation. That could go a long way to helping her feel loved, wanted, less isolated in her golden years.

  5. pluterfraf

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 15:09:12
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    I like your ideas and appreciate your input, but it sounds as if you might be missing my point. The whole purpose of the body bag would be for it to be used at bedtime, when people feel (and are) most vulnerable. Bites during the day are less frequent, the circumstances, less traumatic. Bedbug sufferers are like Janet Leigh in Psycho, only worse: They know they're being hunted. They're in the shower every night, just waiting for that blade to descend.

    I really hope that a professional -- perhaps a packtite rep -- will answer my question before the idea gets lost. You sound as if you'd be interested in the answer, too, losingit.

  6. BugsInTO

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 15:12:20
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    There was a bedbug tent. Here's that link to a previous discussion. Doesnt' seem like the whole thread though.

    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/the-proof-is-in-the-bed-bug-tent

    Don't know if the tent is still available. It wouldn't have worked for me, but I remember the discussion because it was definitely something I would have been interested in if I were single and living in an apt.

    I remember the challenge was in getting into the tent w/o bringing any bedbugs in with you.

    BugsInTO

  7. pluterfraf

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 15:18:53
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    Thanks for the relevant link!

    That's a similar solution and raises a series of interesting problems. For one thing, I don't think the guy ought to have been living in the tent before going to sleep, let alone, eating crackers! The proper use: Shower, climb in, close your eyes. Any tent or suit used for this purpose should necessarily be very easy to clean. Ideally, it could be folded up to fit in a packtite, h-m-m-m-m?

    And of course, a professional might add that people shouldn't get too comfortable with an infestation. But that doesn't help a person who's forced to wait for a landlord to take action, or has a terrible phobia, or needs to get enough sleep to pursue a course of action. And it certainly won't help that poor lady I mentioned before.

    Advantage to the tent: room to move around; less claustrophobic. Advantage to the suit: snug, secure and, effectively, an extension of the bedding.

    Again: Why isn't this solution available now?

  8. losingit

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 16:16:02
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    pluterfraf: don't think I missed the point but maybe I did, I'm not that bright sometimes. Nights ARE the hardest, had many, many (over a year) of them myself. I eventually brought bbs to my workplace, and while I like to think of myself as stylish for my age, even I could not get away with wearing la suit. Could be interesting trying...

    "And of course, a professional might add that people shouldn't get too comfortable with an infestation. But that doesn't help a person who's forced to wait for a landlord to take action, or has a terrible phobia, or needs to get enough sleep to pursue a course of action. And it certainly won't help that poor lady I mentioned before." You're bang on there, treatment should be done effectively until they're gone but the suit would work as a stop gap.

    Let's hope someone can come up with a proto-type, there'd be no shortage of volunteers to try it out, that's for sure.

  9. spideyjg

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 16:21:59
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    BBs will find a way. The tent is perhaps the best thing there could be for isolation like that.

    If you sealed yourself completely except for you nostrils to breath guess what, they would climb in you nose and feed which depending your reaction may cause your nostrils to swell shut and then BBs are the least of your problems.

    Toxifying the blood is a good theory but try and get that concept through the FDA or ASPCA on animals.

    Jim

  10. pluterfraf

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 16:22:43
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    losingit - 1 minute ago  » 
    I eventually brought bbs to my workplace, and while I like to think of myself as stylish for my age, even I could not get away with wearing la suit.

    I know it's OT, but this horrified me. Do you know how you brought bedbugs to your office? If so, what was your mistake?

    And when you say "la suit," are you making a joke about wearing our topic's BB body suit to work or saying your bites were visible to others when you wore a business suit to work?

    I'd like to do everything possible to avoid bringing bugs to the workplace -- especially during a recession!

  11. pluterfraf

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 16:32:19
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    spideyjg - 1 minute ago  » 
    BBs will find a way. The tent is perhaps the best thing there could be for isolation like that.
    If you sealed yourself completely except for you nostrils to breath guess what, they would climb in you nose and feed which depending your reaction may cause your nostrils to swell shut and then BBs are the least of your problems.
    Toxifying the blood is a good theory but try and get that concept through the FDA or ASPCA on animals.
    Jim

    The tent sounds interesting, but I haven't found it offered on a product page. I'd like to study pictures and a product description to get a sense of how it works.

    Re the "bedbugs will find a way" comment:

    Yes, they would eventually sneak in during some moment of sleepy inattention, which is why the bag would have to be easy to clean. But it seems quite possible to design a breathing tube or screen that would block these insects. If nostril holes worked, then it would simply be a matter of wearing an adhesive vinyl face mask with cut-outs, but I think we all realize that wouldn't be effective. But why, spideyjg, wouldn't a specially designed mesh screen or double-screen work? One solution might be an array of holes smaller than pinpoints placed over the nose and mouth, not nostril-sized openings. Is there really a stage at which bedbugs can fit through a hole smaller than the tiniest pinprick?

  12. losingit

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 16:43:17
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    It's posted on this forum, "help, they're at work!". Good title eh?

    In brief, moved into a bb place as it turned out, moved out 2 months later. In the meantime had transported some to work. Had no clue. New apt, no bugs, but kept getting bites non stop... spent 800 bucks on 5 bb dog to new place, nothing. Workplace was hesitant to believe me, took 7 months for them to get the dog in. Bingo! Treated next day, dog came back 3 more times = all clear. Wow, that's almost Coles Notes quality. The full story has more drama, tears, swearing if you want to check it out.

    And I was joking about the 'tyvek' type suit that I couldn't wear to work:) I wouldn't be caught dead in a business suit either though.

    Not dissing you by the way, hope it doesn't come across that way...

  13. pluterfraf

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 17:03:17
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    Didn't take the comment or explanation as a diss, losingit. Some stories need to be told with a smirk and, given the subject, I'm glad you could manage one.

    I'll skim that thread for hints as to how you spread "them." I'm guessing "they" must have ridden your bag and/or your shoes. I'm also curious how your employer knew it was you. Again, I'll check your thread.

    (Edit: I see you told them yourself. That was commendably brave.

    Tyvek suits look like Star Wars costumes from a 99¢ store.)

  14. losingit

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 17:15:30
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    I was the only one who knew or suspected. I had to tell the HR person in confidence, didn't do a lot. HR person then quit and I had to speak to a co-worker on the office Health Committee (again in complete confidence), only then did they get the dog in (which I had begged HR to do and I offered to pay).
    Anyway, seems to be fine now (sorta). No-one knows except for me and Health person.

    And yes, humour comes in handy though I sure didn't find anything funny for over 16 months. Now, well, sure it's funny, especially the Hungarian curse that are supposed to work.

  15. pluterfraf

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 17:31:56
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    It also explains why you stressed protection outside of the bedroom: Your Psycho shower scenes all happened at your desk. That scenario seems unusual now, but it's likely getting more common all the time.

  16. pluterfraf

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Mar 6 2009 21:20:55
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    So, career prostitutes -- what do you suppose they write on their resumés?

    The preceding non sequitur illustrates how far afield this discussion has veered. I believe it's time to fling us back on topic, m-m-m-m?:

    Is there an established exterminator or expert who'd care to comment on the original idea of this thread?

  17. cilecto

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Mar 7 2009 1:51:47
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    I'm no expert, but here are my thoughts. Perhaps not exactly what you're cooking up, but I believe that once BB infestations reach a "tipping point" in society, you'll find a lot more "acceptance" of their presence (vs. "denial") and creative solutions to manage/live with them. Think of camping tents and their "no-see-um netting" windows. That's because enought people want to stay dry, warm and unbitten while camping.

    Yes, BBs would shift to daytime feeding, but at the expense of their stealth. If people see BBs coming their way, they can intercept them (or track them back to their harborages).

    As to "why doesn't someone make this?" Why not you? There was an article in the NYTimes last week about three different people who "invented" a blanket with sleeves (snuggie/slanket/freedomblanket) and started small. Incidentally the article included this gem:

    Mr. Iannuzzi and his wife started selling their fleece-sleeved Freedom Blanket on freedomblanket.com, where it is currently available for $24.99.

    Ms. Iannuzzi makes the blankets herself in their home in Palmyra, N.J., and the couple have sold almost 13,000

    Can you imagine what would happen if the Iannuzzi home had BBs?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/27/business/media/27adco.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=slanket&st=cse

  18. dottie

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Mar 7 2009 6:55:19
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    Cilecto,

    I believe the tipping point will be when celebrities come out and admit when they have them. Just like in the workplace, usually you have to wait until something bothers the elite important people for it to become a "problem" that must get attended to. And you'd think celebrities would get BBs the way they travel around and stay at hotels. When Oprah gets covered with bites she might do a show. Then BBs will be a BIG deal.

    Pluterfraf,

    That body covering suit sounds like a good idea. However, it would have to be very breathable. Not only the face section but the whole thing or it would get so hot. And remember you might have to take it off and put it back on during the night to go to the bathroom. Even if it featured a trap door for going to the bathroom just think how secure it would have to be when not in use as BBs can get into the smallest breach. When I was a kid I used to fantasize about this suit so many times on a hot, humid summer night. At least one mosquito would be in my room. We only had fans so we were at the mercy of anything that could get through the window screens. I'd nearly sweat to death getting under the covers with only my nose sticking out and of course that mosquito would and on my nose. And that awful buzzing. The one and only thing to do was to get up, turn on the light, wait for it to land on the wall and whack it with a fly swatter. But many a night I laid there and imagined your type of suit only I knew it had to not retain body heat and mositure.

    I wish you all the best with your idea.

  19. BugBoy911

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Mar 7 2009 7:36:39
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    What your saying about this BedBug suit is a decent theory for people who have been so psychologically disturbed by these pests, it may give them a sense of security. As far as just wearing a suit and living with BedBugs and acting like their not there or whatever your saying is just not real. Bedbugs spread and reproduce fast, and if you havn't had a decent long lasting preventative treatment then obviously you feel hopeless and never had anybody actually provide results. BedBugs will find you by the CO2 you give off, same for misquitos "spelling tricky word." lol... Have you ever had a PCO with extensive knowledge and practice ever come over to treat? This suit sounds only for the helpless. A suit is completely unneccesary temporary after treatment, mabye.. but not recommended, hey if you want a suit to sleep in consider a Tyvek... You will probaby wake up in a pool of sweat though, so keep the AC on high I understand were your theory is coming from but IMO is a compete waste of money, and even if you had 3 months or a year without any bites wearing this suit, the bedbugs have had that much more time to harbore in many different sites, making it that much more difficult to kill them all. Wether a tent, suit, or any other item for people in denial or just can't afford treatment, and let these pests live in your residence IMO your psychologically just not living in reality. BedBugs will find a way to make your life a nightmare if you give them enough time. By the time you notice and let them go for a year or more, you will have a major problem, usually consisting of 4-8 treatments, sometimes more with general maintance. This will cost you loads of money in the long run. If anybody is considering living with these pests and just make your body bedbug proof to bites, please reconsider for you will realize that they find a way. If a bedbug can't eat for up to 3 months, yes they may starve, but trust me, they will find you and may even come out during the day time to eat when your not wearing the suit. Find a specialist on this site and use him. Stay away from huge companies with 200+ employees and you may have a chance... Just my opinion from working with 4 companies.

  20. cilecto

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Mar 25 2009 18:21:17
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  21. bugration

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    Sun Apr 19 2009 11:05:54
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    Some people have said that the suit would be of no use in an infested house, since bed bugs would inevitably get you in the day etc, but what about hotel use? I for one would find it very useful to have protection from being bitten in a hotel (as hotels tend to be high-risk areas of course). If you travel a lot and bag up all your stuff to prevent taking any BBs with you, then if you also have protection when sleeping you would only really be vulnerable when quickly showering and using the bathroom, and as long as you don't linger I assume the chance of being bitten would be very slim.

    Also, if it was possible to have a sticky outer covering then a suit might have potential as a bed bug trap and even as a gauge for how well an infestation has been controlled (i.e. by counting the number of stuck bugs in the morning) if you are in your house and the PCO has just been. Of course one problem would be it sticking to the bed sheet!

  22. JWhiteBBCTV

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Apr 20 2009 8:37:41
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    I had a person contact me trying to sell the concept and a prototype of a "sleeping chamber" and simply said that I'm not interested. Simple question can help you think logically about the "sleeping bag": What is the goal?

    If you want to say it will provide a good nights sleep to someone who's suffering through an infestation or while they are trying to find a company that knows what they're doing I understand that but think logically about the design of the "bag". That isn't going to be a simple technology. You can't be placing people in a questionably designed "bag" where suffocation could be a concern and with that, it's going to be a costly R&D venture. Therefore, it would be difficult to produce something that costs less than 500$. You're basically talking about a coffin that exchanges gases. A packtite unit costs 299$ and it produces heat in a closed bag. It doesn't have to worry about gas exchange, pressures, breathability, etc...

    So that being said, why is the person suffering through a horrible infestation? 1. It took a while to figure out what was going on for whatever reason or 2. they didn't have the money to correct it properly when it was found.

    If 1 was the reason, hopefully you bring a relatively good company in to start and it should be manageable after one, at most two, treatments. Is the cost of the "bag" worth it for maybe a week of questionable sleep? Maybe for some but not for most. I've mentioned this on this site before but the people who use the board and post are concerned, aware people who are "freaked" out by the bug. People on this board are not the people you run into 80% of the time you perform treatments. Therefore, marketing a "bag" becomes a major issue because who are you selling it to?

    If 2 was the reason, is the person going to be able to afford the bag? Probably not. In fact, unless they design it and it's highly affordable, definitely not.

    On top of all of that, what is it solving other than a sleep issue (which I understand is a big issue)? It's not going to help your problem. The bugs will just wait for you to not sleep in the bag or spread to other apartments and find another host. They will then probably assault you on the couch, kitchen table, etc... So what is it really doing? Use Climbup devices, tuck your sheets in, pull your bed away from the walls, encase your bed, treat the frame and other than the few that fall from the ceiling you should be sleeping much better.

  23. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon Apr 20 2009 14:32:36
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    This is the travel tent referenced in the post linked to above. If you click the photo of the tent, you will be taken to the site selling it.

    A few people have tried it with mixed reviews, but I am not recommending this method.

    A commenter in the article linked above mentions finding evidence of bites after sleeping in the tent. It would be easy enough to carry bed bugs into the tent, or for them to walk in when you opened the zipper briefly. For this reason, I do not think it is a reliable solution.

    And, of course, even if you manage to stop being bitten in bed (by this method, or by "isolating the bed"), you can and will be bitten elsewhere in the home, for example, sitting on a chair.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  24. ChicagoBedBugs

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Apr 25 2009 13:14:42
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    There is a "body bag" / sleeping bag thing that a few of my coworkers use. I am tempted to get one for hotel use and keep it in a sealed ziplock bag in my suitcase.
    I am a flight attendant who thinks she brought the buggers home to Chicago from one of my trips. I am almost positive I picked them up in Orlando but I can't prove it since I thought originally they were mosquito bites from laying out in the sun. I have a HORRID swelling/ welt like reaction to some of the bites. I officially found 4-5 bugs in my quilt at home yesterday with the little larve ones and droppings.
    I have some other bed bug questions but I will post them in another section of the forum. Thanks for all your awesome info on the new hell in my life!! LOL

  25. dottie

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Apr 25 2009 14:10:26
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    You'd have to get out of it and then they would get you and quickly enough the full body covering would be just another piece of stuff in the house. I've thought of such a thing in the past though, but for other bugs. Before I met BBs. Once I woke to a feeling on my forehead and brushed it off and then turned to see what it was and it was a daddy longlegs. They are my cryptonite and I was terrified for days/nights after that. Lord knows what crawls on us at night.

  26. dottie

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    Sat Apr 25 2009 14:13:05
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    .......off and it was a daddy long legs. They are my cryptonite and I was terrified for days/nights afterward. I've had roaches on me, too. Lord knows what crawls on us at night even in a BB-free environment. Don't get me started on the thought of spiders.

  27. victimized

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    Tue Dec 14 2010 3:23:08
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    It thrills me to see I am not the only person thinking of these things. The people in my immediate surroundings sympathize with my suffering and stress and wish it to be over merely for my sake. Before bed I cover my face, ears, and neck with petroleum jelly (I do this anyway but use more for this purpose) and I go to sleep with the blankets wrapped tight around me.
    My first thought was to invent a bug-safe body bag, like a sleeping bag, which acts in the way mosquito netting does. As the long yet really short nights (going to bed around 4am) progressed my ideas did too. Full bed bug proof body suits! Made of encasement sort of breathable material. That way they can't get into your hair, clothes, etc. I would seriously wear one of these around my house just to know I don't have to keep checking my waistline, cuffs, neckline, etc.
    What is funniest, is that Home Depot sells various body protection suits/gear for doing different jobs. They have full body chemical proof suits with hoods but also cloth like suits that almost feel like encasements for doing dusty or messy work (ever knock out plaster?)They have hoods but nothing over the face and the cuffs are normal. The hands and feet are exposed. They do sell shoe covers, maybe stitch them on?
    I am a seamstress of sorts and was looking at those bed bug proof drawer liners. $10 a pop? Yeah right! Even one day when I feel safe in my home again I don't think I will ever want to abandon the ziploc bag system and wish there was bug proof clothing storage for preventative measures. Garment bags are good. How hard would it be to design and make my own from vinyl and use a nice tight, double seam with a small stitch? They need to invent zippers that have no openings at the end.

  28. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Dec 15 2010 3:15:05
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    What several people who tried it found when they used the Travel Tent referenced in these posts (which I assume is the bed bug tent BugsinTo mentions above) is that they were finding bed bugs in the tent.

    It's really hard to avoid tracking bed bugs into any kind of sleeping chamber or bag. I can imagine a bed inside a sauna, which you can heat (empty) nightly to debug before going to bed. But presumably you have to walk from the shower (where you washed and changed into bed bug-free bagged pyjamas), so the debugging could not be 100% foolproof and would have to constantly be repeated.

    Also, even if it does work, bugs who aren't biting in bed and are desperate to bite you when you're awake and sitting or standing.

  29. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Dec 15 2010 3:18:17
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    victimized - 23 hours ago  » 
    How hard would it be to design and make my own from vinyl and use a nice tight, double seam with a small stitch? They need to invent zippers that have no openings at the end.

    MattressSafe and Protect-a-bed encasements use various mechanisms to prevent bed bugs coming through the gap where the zipper closes. (Most encasements don't.) Something like this applied to a garment bag or other hanging storage would be great.

    There is a lot of room for products and services to be developed to help those fighting bed bugs, for anyone who is inclined and who has the know-how and time. Many such products and services have been suggested by us right here on this website, and are just waiting for someone to make them happen.

  30. ICAN

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Dec 15 2010 4:08:27
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    Bedbugs are cold blooded insects. The information I found online stated that all of their activity ceases at temperatures in the 50's, so if the room is cool enough, they "stop cold".

    My house is cool and the bedroom is even cooler. I don't know exactly what the temperature is, but it's cold enough so I dress in layers to survive.
    If there are bedbugs, they aren't moving and they're not able to creep into bed with me.

    Now I don't dread going to bed or sleep with the light on or scratch myself frantic. They're not biting me. We have several more months of cold. It's nice to get some peaceful sleep at night.

  31. Rosae

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jun 13 2011 13:14:14
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    I've created a sleeping bag out of very thin netting. I take my sheets with me inside the bag, one small sheet to lay on and a larger one on top of me to protect me from touching the net. If you really can't sleep out of fear for being bitten, it helps. At normal room temperature it gets too hot inside and then I need to switch on a ventilator. If you can stand the noise, you can sleep fine and even watch television through the netting.

    The bugs know very well what a zipper is, so you have to place the zipper (or the velcro) at the bottom, under your bottom sheet and put something around it to delude them.

    If commercially available for a few dollars, it can be a great tool, but only temporary.

  32. Rosae

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jun 13 2011 13:41:48
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    cilecto - 2 years ago  » 
    These guys are half-way there - http://www.adultfootedpjs.com/ - just add headgear.
    Hat-tip; CrunchGear. http://www.crunchgear.com/2009/03/25/adult-footed-pajamas-offered-as-ultimate-answer-to-exorbitant-heating-bills/

    The bed bugs can bite through jersey material and they can go through two layers of white tennis socks.


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