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Who knows the incubation time/range of bb eggs, lay to hatch ??

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  1. Bugalina

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 12 2007 10:14:47
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    I was wondering today if a professional can answer what the incubation period is for bed bug eggs...How long does it take them to hatch from the time they are laid? Are there environmental variables for them, like temperature, humidity, light, dark..etc. In other words do they hatch sooner after being laid in a hot humid climate as opposed to a cold dry climate? ( this is just an example )..
    Also, what if anything would stress the eggs out, potentially causing them not to hatch.....I would love for every bed bug egg to be stillborn.

  2. BBsBlow

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 12 2007 11:52:48
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    If only!

  3. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 12 2007 13:52:49
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    Hi Bugalina,

    If you do a google "bed bugs+hatching" a lot of the commercial sites now offer life cycle info. on the front page of their websites. This just wasn;t so, 5 months ago, when I checked out some of these companies.

    Hatching:
    I saw 8-10 days
    I saw 1 to 2 weeks
    I saw 5-21 days
    Those figures were the first three links I looked at.

    There are now hundreds of entries--what a big business this has become!
    Also, the amount of eggs laid is quite variable

    I saw 200--500 in their entire lifetime
    I also saw 200-500 in 2 months.
    So that's confusing!

    "I saw "one blood meal will cause an average of 5 eggs laid for up to 5 days"
    Now come on ... that = 25 eggs per blood meal? I don't think that is averaged I think it is the ultimate extreme # of eggs, or a typo, or just plain bunk.

    I'm not a professional but Google and see what comes up.

    In my "google-ing" I also saw an adult can live up to 7 months without a blood meal, and I also saw that the nymphs can live for up to 3 months without a blood meal.
    It did not specify which stage of nymph.

    Since they are mostly commercial links to pest control companies--I can't leave any type of a link. But somebody (s) out there is/are giving misinformation to customers.

    There were some professional links too--they all vary slightly.
    ***********************************************

    Plus, I'd have no reason to lie about what I saw happen, that one time.

    My six, captive eggs were all laid within 36 hours--after a second blood meal. They all hatched in 9-10 days. This was under an average, 55-65 degrees F and they were kept in sealed darkness for about 90% of that time—from the point just after they were laid, until hatching. The air was still. I only allowed some free air exchange every other day for 5 minutes.

    The female that laid them bit once and laid NO eggs (she was nearly starved to death.)

    Then she bit again 3 and 1/2 days later, and she laid only six eggs total. As I said—she seemed a bit “war torn.”
    OF COURSE I DO NOT EVER RECCOMEND ANYONE TRY THIS AT HOME. I LIVE ALONE AND IT TOOK ME HOURS TO SET THIS UP SO IT WAS TRIPLE SAFE--EVEN THEN THERE WERE A FEW NEAR MISHAPS. I'D NEVER TRY IT AGAIN!

  4. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 12 2007 14:01:48
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    OF COURSE BUGALINA'S ORIGINAL QUESTION IS STILL LEFT UNANSWERED: BUGALINA ASKED:

    "I was wondering today if a professional can answer what the incubation period is for bed bug eggs...How long does it take them to hatch from the time they are laid? Are there environmental variables for them, like temperature, humidity, light, dark..etc. In other words do they hatch sooner after being laid in a hot humid climate as opposed to a cold dry climate? ( this is just an example )..
    Also, what if anything would stress the eggs out, potentially causing them not to hatch.....I would love for every bed bug egg to be stillborn."

  5. rom

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 12 2007 18:34:36
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    In the ecology chapter of "Monograph of Cimicidae", Table 2-1 lists the development periods. For C. lectularius, the egg stage is 20.9 days at 18C, 12.1 at 22C, 5.3 at 27C, 4.4 at 30C, and 4.1 at 33C. The original reference for the table is Omori, N. 1941. "Comparative studies on the ecology and physiology of common and tropical bed bugs, with special references to the reactions to temperature and moisture. J Med Ass Formosa 60(4) no.433: 555-729.

  6. Anonymous

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 12 2007 19:47:04
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    Hi rom,

    Now you've gone and outed yourself as someone in possession of a copy the Usinger text! Don't be surprised if you get a lot of questions!!

    Harold Harlan in his Army technical guide says the "egg to egg" life cycle is 4-5 weeks at 75-80% RH and 83-90dF. So relative humidity must also play a role.

  7. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 12 2007 20:49:29
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    hi rom, what can you tell me about the # of eggs laid, per blood meal?

  8. Bugalina

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 12 2007 21:24:37
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    So..Please Rom...is what you said that the eggs take only 4-5 days to hatch if the temperature is in the nineties and considerably longer to hatch when it is cold ?? From your answer can I assume that on average it takes about 5 days for them to hatch?? Hopelessnomo...4-5 weeks is very different than from what Rom says....So I ask again...Please anyone who may have some knowledge of this...can you weigh in???
    Maybe I read this wrong??

  9. rom

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 12 2007 22:29:14
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    First off, I'd like to say that I'm no expert and have only borrowed the Usinger text from the university library to try to understand these things better. The bedbugger site and these forums have been a great source of information for me, so please do feel free to ask but also remember that I'm not a professional (and haven't read the whole book, especially skipping the long part on taxonomy of different stages and species) and haven't read any of the more recent literature.

    There wasn't anything (from what I've read) on humidity and egg stage length but "nymphs kept under extremely dry atmospheric conditions (0 to 20% RH) often died during moltin." Also, "in air at 90% RH and a temperature of 30 deg C, they [first-instar nymphs] survived 26.3 days. At lower humidities (60, 30, and 0%) survival time dropped progressively to 5.68 days and dessication was the principal cause of death...Because in all cases survival time was increased if the bugs were fed, it was concluded that blood must have provided a supply of water."

    Willow:
    There is a chart (Fig 8-1) in the reproductive physiology chapter of the daily egg production of 45 females given a single blood meal. It's better in chart form but I don't have a scanner so here's my readings of it:

    day 2: 0
    day 3: ~1.5
    day 4: ~5
    day 5: ~3.5
    day 6: ~2.8
    day 7: ~2.7
    day 8: ~1
    day 9: ~0.3
    days 10-11: <0.1
    day 12: 0

    From the text: "During this period an average of about 3 eggs per female per day is produced. If the insects are fed weekly but not mated again, this level of producdtion will continue for about 5 weeks; beyond this period, increasing numbers of non-viable eggs are produced, and within 2 to 4 weeks egg production stops entirely." The original source is Davis, N. T. 1964. Studies of the reproductive physiology of Cimidae (Hemiptera)I. Fecundationa and egg maturation. J . INsect Physiol. 10: 947-63

    Bugalina:
    I think what you've said is the same as what I understood from the chart. Those times were only for the egg stage so it fits with hopelessnomo's information. The same chart has lengths for the nymphal stages too and total development period (127.9 days at 18 deg C, 58.3 at 22 deg C, 31.3 days at 27 deg C, 24.2 days at 30 deg C, and 36.6 days at 33 deg C).

  10. Anonymous

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 12 2007 22:30:43
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    Hi Bugalina, I didn't mean to confuse you, I was referencing Harlan on the complete bed bug life cycle from egg to adult to new egg, which assumes "favorable" conditions. (See this faq for a more graphic representation of the life cycle with actual bugs.)

    The table cited by Rom for eggs to hatch would translate as follows (I used google for temperature conversions):

    20.9 days at 18C or 64.4F
    12.1 days at 22C or 71.6F
    5.3 days at 27C or 80.6F
    4.4 days at 30C or 86F
    4.1 days at 33C or 91.4F

  11. Anonymous

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 12 2007 22:31:33
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    Cross posted with rom. Thanks, rom.

  12. Bugalina

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 12 2007 22:49:06
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    hopelessnomo and Rom thank you...so can we safely say that people who are infested now, in NYC and surrounding environs can expect new bites 4-5 days after they are treated, assuming that eggs exist ??

  13. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 12 2007 22:53:30
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    Bugalina,
    It looks like that might be right but it assumes people aren't air conditioning their homes at all.
    With a/c, you might be more in the 12 day ballpark, or even longer, if you like it cold.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  14. Anonymous

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 12 2007 23:00:03
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    Probably...

    But remember that eggs may already be present that were laid who knows when, as well as adult bugs or nymphs at different stages that successfully hid from the pesticides, so one really cannot say when one can expect bites after a treatment.

    I'm not sure if it's relevant to your question, but Cooper is advising 55 days of no signs or bites to declare victory. I would say at least one month to feel comfortable.

  15. Anonymous

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 12 2007 23:03:03
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    Didn't see Nobugs' post. One more reason to turn off the a/c during the day if you're not home. Also, DE is said to be more effective at high temperatures, if one is using DE.

  16. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Aug 13 2007 1:02:06
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    In English ..

    That’s 15 bites 45 females and 675 or 700 eggs/hatchlings--all in just 10 days!
    Why do people wait? Why do PCO’s and landlords not consider that prompt repetitive treatments must occur and at certain intervals?
    Why do some sufferer’s not seem to realize they have to do these cleaning and laundry and other tasks over and over for those 55 days? Of course, lessening them some about half way thru, but still doing them, fairly regularly?

    Food for thought, not for bugs

    Be Bait but do not be bitten!

    Even the one’s dying will be laying eggs: bed bugs love to have sex. Females can lay eggs for a long, long time as they carry the semen from multiple matings, within them, to impregnate the eggs for months!

    Add that to the complexities already implied.

    But Rom .... The source that was quoted mentioned the tropical verion. SO were these 45 bugs Temperates, the Cimex, lecularious, or were they the egg production stats for the closley related, but much more temperature sensitive tropicals, the sub species, the Cimex, hemiptera?

    Do you know?

    I love this thread more than any I’ve ever seen here!
    Thank you all!!!

  17. scaredy-cat

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Wed Sep 18 2013 10:55:43
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    So back to this question. To keep it simple would we say they hatch in no more than 21 days? So that means items should be bagged for 21 days?

  18. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Wed Sep 18 2013 10:59:46
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    Hi scaredy-cat,

    No items that are suspect or known to have bedbugs are bagged for 18 months or until they have been treated in a way known to be effective and reliable at killing bedbugs and their eggs.

    There is a good FAQ on decontaminating stuff linked below:

    http://bedbugger.com/faqs/stuff/

    Hope that is clear.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bedbug infestations in domestic and commercial settings. The patent numbers are GB2463953 and GB2470307.

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