Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Psychological and Health problems caused by bed bugs (besides bites)

When did you stop worrying about BBs?

(5 posts)
  1. manue

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Aug 29 2012 13:48:13
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    Hello,

    As a recap of my story, we had a small infestation in July (a few bites, and found one dead bed bug), so we got a PCO to do one treatment spaying permethrin and putting boric acid in cracks. The PCO did not find any bugs in the apartment. We also washed everything in hot water and bagged it away. Today is the three week mark since the treatment. We have not seen any live or dead bugs since treatment. We have sticky passives under the bed. I check them every day and they've all been clear.

    However, I'm still worried. It's nothing like the sleepless nights of the first weeks, but I still worry every time my body shows a spot of any kind (most likely random bumps I think). And I have had a few spots, though I don't think they were itchy like the bites. My friends have started coming over to our apartment again and that worries me too. And now I am going to my parents' house for the long weekend and I worry about bringing them, so I guess I will take all the necessary precautions again. I just cannot bear the idea of being responsible for a friend or family member getting an infestation because of me. I am also hesitant about taking my stuff out of the bags, because I never want to have to do that much laundry again.

    I guess my question is, how long did it take before you stopped worrying? (do we ever?!?)
    And when did you know for sure that you were bed bug free?

    Thanks!

  2. kinihatesbedbugs

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Aug 29 2012 20:05:48
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    Hey Manue ,

    I had a small infestation in July in my vacation apartment with only two treatments. I'm into week six and I no longer sleep with a flash light but I have one on my dresser. I just recently started having friends over too. They are aware of the situation and are pretty comfortable coming to my apartment. I still have my clothes and shoes in ziplock bags and sterile containers. In the beginning I was getting no sleep worried about every itch and every spec of lint on my sheets. I'm on anxiety meds. I'm not taking every night like I was during weeks 1 to 3. I'm having the occasional drink to calm my nerves too. I met wonderful people on the forum " Sharing progress after first treatment - moral support" where we support each other which really has helped the most.

    I commute back and forth to my home and I'm really careful before I come into the house. I leave my bags in the car and strip off my clothes in my sun porch and throw them right into the washer and dry them on High. I also bought a steamer to steam clean my car seats and rugs as a precaution.
    I think once I'm at the two month mark, I'll feel more at ease.

    Hang in there!

  3. Blackheart

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Aug 29 2012 20:20:22
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    In answer to your question, i honestly believe once you've been through the bb thing your life probably changes forever, not really in a bad way, but probably alot more OCD and diligent at making your best effort of NOT having to deal with it again, I'm pretty sure I will keep my clothing in the large tupperware containers and keep used clothing separate and outside on the balcony.

    Its such a traumatic experience I know myself I don't want to deal with it again if there is ANY way I can possibly avoid it, so yeah I will be living in containers and plastic from now on, and will definitely think twice about who I allow in my apartment (because I have some idea of who may have possibly brought this problem to my home).

    Life has changed forever as far as I'm concerned!

    Also third spray last week, and I don't know If I'm free of these suckers or not, too soon to tell I think,

    Sam

  4. manue

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Aug 29 2012 22:47:27
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    Well I'm glad to hear I'm not the only one who feels that way.
    I worry more about spreading them than about getting them again at this point, though I realize it's definitely something to consider too because the source may be local after all.
    My friends are aware of the situation too, but you know, people are a little careless when they haven't been through it themselves. And they tend to think that I can't possibly still have bed bugs because I'm so neat and tidy. I keep telling them BBs are quite the equal opportunity pest. I also wish it were easier to recognize bites...

  5. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Aug 30 2012 1:24:51
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    Bed bugs can do a number on your sense of security. Especially because -- while not life threatening (except in a few extreme cases where people are deathly allergic), they hit close to home and make us worry about the most basic things, like being safe and comfortable when you go to sleep. It's understandable to be anxious and worried about going through this again.

    I think most people here do find this anxiety lessening in time.

    Anecdotally, I think most of us probably are somewhat more careful and aware now than before bed bugs.

    For example, I search hotel rooms before settling in, but I still travel. And once I do my search, I enjoy myself and don't spend the whole time panicking. When I get home, I Packtite my bags.

    I've been able to find some middle ground between being careful and alert and still living life. I think most of us do, from what I have seen in others here. You may be more cautious and somewhat anxious for a while but this anxiety will likely lessen in time.

    If it doesn't, some here have seen a therapist and found it helpful.

    At the end of the day, some awareness and some precautions can go a long way in preventing a recurrence. Nothing can completely prevent it. So you have to do what you can do and find a way to live with what you can't completely control, as in other areas of life.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."

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