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What Do You Make Of This Article?

(16 posts)
  1. saloosh

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Sun Jan 7 2018 16:03:07
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    The Independent just published an article from a Glasgow lecturer that first appeared on The Conversation. If it is ok, I am including the link to the article here. And I'm curious to know what you guys think of this piece:

    Scottish Neighborhood living with BBs

    In summary, the author highlights Govanhill, a district in Glassgow that isn't doing very well. There is a bed bug problem throughout the town, and public initiaves have led the way to treatments, but these treatments have been innefective. As a result, the author says that some citizens have concluded to live with the bugs, and that furthermore, this could be a model for how we are all eventually going to have to live.

    Through her choice of words, it's clear the author is saying this is merely something to think about, but that philosophy seems to be jumping the gun a bit. Before we get to a point where the world collectively throws in the towel, we would have to first make an attempt at coming together to solve this thing, which hasn't been done yet.

    She also points out that truly eradicating BBs might hurt the environment (at least this is what I gather). Yet is glosses over the fact that so much more could be done aside from chemical solutions. Proper social and moral approaches could go a long way, such as full regard and compliance by Landlord, Tenant, PCO, Government, and The Public. Something difficult to accomplish, but if we did achieve this, the numbers would have to significantly decrease.

    She also goes on to say that it is a lifestyle decision for those who have decided to live with the bugs, one that was made through experience and analysis. And any objection from someone outside could be considered classist. I don't know. I'm a bit confused by some of the statements made in the article.

    Overall, I do not aim to bash this person for writing this article. I think it is a very interesting read. And it brings up a great point that, if we don't change our approach on a large scale, this might be what the future will hold.

    Would really love to know what you all think about this article.

    Thank you for your time,
    Saloosh

  2. thirdusername

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Sun Jan 7 2018 18:44:27
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    I agree that it is a problem that the average person doesn't inspect and identify anymore.
    I disagree that people should give up on treating them and just live with them.
    I agree that a lot of current treatments are environmentally unfriendly but I believe there will be new environmentally friendly treatments developed.

    I am NOT an expert.
    My opinions are just opinions, they may NOT apply to yours or any situation.
    My advice is to always do a LOT of research.
    A lot of what I read contradicts other stuff on the Interweb.
  3. loubugs

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Sun Jan 7 2018 23:38:40
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    Much of the problem has to do with people giving up. Some people don't care about it. No one is operating on the same page to deal with the issue. The area seems to be one where there is much immigration and not all the people who arrive think the same way about these insects, so it makes sense that the infestations continue.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  4. SS864

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Mon Jan 8 2018 4:27:00
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    Screw that, I'll accept a little environmental trade-off to get rid of these tiny assholes. Living alongside them makes no sense whatsoever. Allowing them to reproduce and thrive unchecked in a residence would guarantee that they would hitch a ride wherever the host went. They would spread like wildfire. The reality aside that you would be a bed bug meal literally everywhere you went, be it your workplace, the library, cabs, literally everywhere, can you imagine the property damage caused by hundreds of thousands or millions of these little peckers as they left their feces and cast skins everywhere? I've already watched videos on YouTube showing piles of cast skins just chilling next to bedding painted in fecal staining with hundreds of bed bugs strolling around.... knowing someone was sleeping on that bedding every night should be enough to warrant a psych eval. In one video the tenant was squishing the bed bugs on the wall next to his bed..... no attempt was made to clean this up whatsoever. I would purify my house with fire before accepting that as my everyday reality.

  5. SS864

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Mon Jan 8 2018 4:31:18
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  6. SS864

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Mon Jan 8 2018 4:41:06
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    I find this guy's videos about catching bed bugs oddly entertaining, lol.

    https://youtu.be/DvgaEZ4A8RE

  7. SS864

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Mon Jan 8 2018 4:49:22
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    An entertaining documentary about the spread of bedbugs with an appearance around the 36:30 mark by our own Loubugs!!

    https://youtu.be/PSlNeOwvegs

  8. bitethebullet

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Mon Jan 8 2018 18:12:32
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    To throw in the towel on a problem that causes a lot of mental distress and also physical pain seems ridiculous to me. There are people out there that have super horrible reactions to the bites, and there are those of us that this causes deep, mental anguish.

    They can be killed, it’s just going to take time and a lot of work. There needs to be more awareness and systems put in place in shared spaces to stop it from spreading. I refuse to “just learn to live with them”. Just like we wouldn’t put up with a flea infestation, why put up with bed bugs? They populate at a fast rate and do cause a certain amount of filth, shedding and defecating on everything. I really think this article misses the mark and it’s a really sad situation those people are in.

    “I’ve got edge!”

    “You’re about as edgy as a satsuma.”
  9. FayeState

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Mon Jan 8 2018 19:47:27
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    SS864 - 14 hours ago  » 
    An entertaining documentary about the spread of bedbugs with an appearance around the 36:30 mark by our own Loubugs!!
    https://youtu.be/PSlNeOwvegs

    What an upsetting video. I feel so sorry for all these people and very stressed after watching it.

  10. saloosh

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Tue Jan 9 2018 1:22:01
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    I agree completely. This was my first post after following the forum for quite a while. I had always been afraid to post as, like a lot of us, these things had taken my sanity and I was afraid to say something stupid that would get me kicked off immediately. But please know that I completely agree with your replies. I will never accept living among these things. And it boggles my mind that a well-known publication would print an article basically advocating such an idea.

    Watching that documentary triggers a ton of questions/thoughts/feelings/fears. One of the many--Don't want to sound like I'm singling this out as the sole reason, this just happens to be floating around in my head--but one of the many problems that this documentary touches upon is the cost of a thorough treatment. One woman paid $10,000. Another family paid $30,00 and cleaned out their children's college savings. Those who didn't have the money had to adopt techniques that definitely didnt fix the problem. It is no secret that people can't afford this.

    I've always wondered, what are a PCO's operating costs to charge that much money? I'm so sorry if a professional on this site were to read this and get upset. But seriously, why so much? I would love to see a rundown of where those thousands of dollars go after all is said and done.
    It's too expensive. That is a giant problem.

    So how do we combat that? Implementing sliding scale payment systems or payment plans? What about philanthropy? Creating an organization that seeks funds toward treatments for those who can't afford it. Bed bug insurance? I don't know. Sorry to digress.

  11. Mizlizkitty

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Tue Jan 9 2018 10:13:02
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    I’m dealing with elderly parents who are quite non plussed by the whole bed bug thing. It has caused a fracture into our relationship since I cannot live that way nor would I willingly allow my children to get eaten alive.

    If you consider humans on this planet it is only in recent times we have shifted away from lives that considered living along side pests the norm.

    My sister in law from South America said until she came to the US lice was just part of life.

    And there are pest we DO live with. Mosquitos, ants etc.

  12. hearty

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Wed Jan 10 2018 15:02:31
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    Saloosh, in response to:

    "So how do we combat that? Implementing sliding scale payment systems or payment plans? What about philanthropy? Creating an organization that seeks funds toward treatments for those who can't afford it. Bed bug insurance? I don't know. Sorry to digress."

    I totally agree with your thinking here and your questions. And also thank you for posting the article. I myself, dealing with this problem for so long, *almost* came to the same conclusion of: OMG, will we (or I) just be living with them as a new normal, but i think I can still get rid of mine, and hopefully not get them again.

    I worry about it tho, too many people are not taking care of it and this will always be the case: there will always be elderly who can not do it for a variety of reasons (mental decline, financial), there will always be mentally challenged people who can not do it, at any age, and maybe others who just don't care because they don't have the mindset. This is a reality. And therefore your suggestions are all valid and hopefully something will be done about it. And maybe, someone or team will find a solution (literally) to kill them more effectively.

    I would throw in the unpopular: federal or state legislation, funds to combat this. Possibly through the CDC. Although bed bugs don't cause physical health problems THEY DO CAUSE MENTAL EMOTIONAL PSYCHOLOGICAL health problems, even to the brink of suicide! (Don't kick me off, I'm fine, just stating a fact). I actually got this sentiment from my first PCO. The only problem with having to report bed bugs to a governmental organization is the lack of discretion...which would have to be addressed. No one wants to admit publicly they have them. It can cause more problems than we are already dealing with.

  13. BigDummy

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Wed Jan 10 2018 16:14:22
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    Ethnocentricity is a funny thing.

    HVAC/Locksmith/Bed Bug Control for a non-profit homeless shelter and long term veteran housing.
  14. FayeState

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Wed Jan 10 2018 16:31:12
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    I think providing assistance to people who can not afford treatment would be great. I know I've read every once in a while, usually around Christmas, where a PCO volunteers services to a person who has a bed bug problem and can't afford treatment.

    As to the CDC being involved, there is a health issue in that people can have secondary infections which need to the need for treatment. Also, mental health problems can lead to physical health problems.

  15. SS864

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Wed Jan 10 2018 19:10:30
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    hearty - 4 hours ago  » 
    Although bed bugs don't cause physical health problems THEY DO CAUSE MENTAL EMOTIONAL PSYCHOLOGICAL health problems, even to the brink of suicide! (Don't kick me off, I'm fine, just stating a fact.

    Have people been kicked off this site before?

  16. thirdusername

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Thu Jan 11 2018 2:06:09
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    SS864 - 6 hours ago  » 

    hearty - 4 hours ago  » 
    Although bed bugs don't cause physical health problems THEY DO CAUSE MENTAL EMOTIONAL PSYCHOLOGICAL health problems, even to the brink of suicide! (Don't kick me off, I'm fine, just stating a fact.

    Have people been kicked off this site before?

    I doubt it.


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