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Washing Machines

(14 posts)
  1. heavyrocker

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Jan 28 2011 12:45:36
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    I wondering can washing machines spread BB`S,...if someone uses the machine and water isnt hot,will the next person using machine pick up eggs or maybe bugs?And some places turn heat on low inthe dryers to save money.I say before waering clothes steam clean them after washing and drying or use oven on 150 degrees heat for 1/2 hour.

    [Admin note: this is bad advice. Please do not do this. Baking clothing and other items may lead to fire.]

  2. kirads09

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Jan 28 2011 13:23:17
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    I guess it could be possible.
    I would think the water (regardless of temp) would drown and kill most anything that might be in there, wouldn't it?

  3. kirads09

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Jan 28 2011 13:27:16
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    Just adding -
    I don't trust the temp of the "energy efficient" dryers in my apts laundry room. Thus I packtite all my laundry after drying. Time consuming, but feel that is the only way I can be confident.

  4. heavyrocker

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Jan 28 2011 13:48:34
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    kirads09

    Eggs dont drown.AND i think ive heard the evil bastards can swim.

  5. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Jan 28 2011 17:34:10
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    heavyrocker - 3 hours ago  » 
    kirads09
    Eggs dont drown.AND i think ive heard the evil bastards can swim.

    That is incorrect

    Bed bug eggs and bed bugs that break the surface tension of the water can be drowned.

    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/3217659/papers/Naylor%202010.pdf

  6. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Jan 28 2011 17:54:12
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    Bed bugs will drown, if they are kept underwater for 24 hours.

    Bed bug eggs had a 100% survival rate after being submerged for 24 hours in cold water without detergent in Richard Naylor's study, but may be affected by some laundry additives or killed by water temperatures over 140 degrees F.

  7. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Jan 28 2011 18:04:34
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    heavyrocker - 5 hours ago  » 
    I wondering can washing machines spread BB`S,...if someone uses the machine and water isnt hot,will the next person using machine pick up eggs or maybe bugs?And some places turn heat on low inthe dryers to save money.I say before waering clothes steam clean them after washing and drying or use oven on 150 degrees heat for 1/2 hour.

    Steam cleaning will work, if properly performed.

    Placing clothing in the oven is a recipe for starting a house fire.

    You can check the temperature of a dryer or heated clothing easily with an infrared thermometer.

    You can find an inexpensive infrared thermometer from discount tool suppliers like Northern Tools http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200395582_200395582

  8. kirads09

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Jan 28 2011 19:40:14
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    Doug - thanks for that info!!

  9. cilecto

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Jan 28 2011 19:45:11
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    Whatever you do, do not bake your clothes in the oven.

    I'm not an expert, but suspect the following:
    - bugs loose in a washer are likely to be ejected by rinse/spin. Eggs attached to items are likely unaffected.
    - neither wash nor dry will hurt straggler bugs on exterior surfaces (or interior parts of a washer that might not get wet), so care should be taken where items are placed.
    - the key to BB control is the dryer. For already clean items, the wash can be skipped, with just a run through the dryer. As long as you get the item thoroughly heated, it takes a lot less heat and less time than most people seem to think. Here's a link to a thread I started on this topic, including entomologist data.
    http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/how-hot-how-long-how-dead#post-95191

    HR, I'm detecting a pattern. You post what appears to be "helpful" at first glance, but often includes a dangerous "twist". And never a disclaimer as to your lack of expertise, experience or credentials. People fighting BB are confused and scared enough, as is. What's your motivation for playing head games with them? And those of us who donate our time and energy to helping people here have had to spend it cleaning up after the crap you leave, so that people don't get hurt. How do you carry this on your conscience? Have you nothing better to do?

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night; nor for the arrow that flieth by day; Nor for the pestilence that walketh in darkness; nor for the destruction that wasteth at noonday. A thousand shall fall at thy side, and ten thousand at thy right hand; but it shall not come nigh thee.
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  10. KingofPrussia

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Jan 28 2011 20:22:11
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    Pretty sure they can live in machines. I live in an apt. complex w/shared laundry w/ top loading machines. I did wash and had on a fleece top when putting / taking out my laundy. Minutes later when I was watching TV, a bed bug was on my arm. This was 2 years ago and I never saw one before or since in my apt. I have to believe I got a BB from the washer. I did travel that day in an airplane, so maybe it was on my fleece since then, but think about it - A load in cold water by someone w/ a big infestation. Easily a BB could float to the side and hang on to or climb to a dry parts of the machine. I hope I'm wrong, but think I am right. Neil in King of Prussia.

  11. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jan 29 2011 2:00:09
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    heavyrocker,

    I note that your "oven" suggestion is very dangerous and has been responded to on another thread. Please do not start new threads to promote ideas others have disagreed with.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  12. CimexH8er

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jan 29 2011 5:01:34
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    Cilecto: Thanks for the link on the data re: times and temps for dryers to be effective. My dryer doesn't really reach 120F, hovers around 105 F so I usually just put a dry load (if the clothes are already cleaned) and nuke them for an hour or more in the dryer. I think it was previously answered via other threads from PCOs and entos that the drying part is the more important component via washing. Thanks.

  13. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jan 29 2011 9:50:11
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    CimexH8TR
    The temperature range for your dryer may be adjustable or replacement parts should be available to bring the temps up into a normal range.

    Running your low temp dryer for long periods may exceed the cost of acquiring a hotter dryer.

    Long exposures at 105 degrees F have been shown to be lethal, but you don't really have any margin for error... A Packtite would be a better option.

    Use of a tankless auxiliary water heater to boost the temperature of the wash cycle to 140 degrees F would kill all stages of bugs and eggs in the washer... unfortunately water that hot is hazardous... but it may require less energy than long periods of time in a low temp dryer.

  14. CimexH8er

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jan 29 2011 12:47:00
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    Doug: Thanks for the info on the dryer! I would have never thought of replacing just a small component of the dryer to increase the temp, I thought you had to replace the whole entire damn thing! I have a PT and it's great, just takes awhile to reach core temp (I think mine takes about 4 hrs. or so). Thx for replying to another thread about suitcases too.


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