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wait - bedbugs can live longer than 18 months now???

(7 posts)
  1. readingrainbow

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Jun 14 2011 1:02:56
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    i thought the rule of thumb was that bedbugs die after 18 months in a plastic bag but i saw a post on here saying there were some reports that this isn't the case...

    i had bedbugs but everything is clear... no bites, nothing... except i still have my laptop and camera in a sealed plastic bag. i just feel like whatever i do to assure myself there are no bugs there (they traveled in one or the other, just trust me on this) it won't be enough, since there still seems to be no agreed-upon method to treat electronics. so i think i'm just going to buy new stuff and take the old stuff out of the bag in 18 months. 18 months is still a safe waiting period, though... right... RIGHT???

  2. pidju

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Jun 14 2011 2:07:41
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    Hello,

    My entomologist friend tells me there has been one recorded case of a bed bug living 20 months : a well fed female kept in cool conditions. However, it was an exceptional case

  3. spideyjg

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Jun 14 2011 8:11:54
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    Lifespans are dependent on temperature. The longest spans 1 year+ were at 50F and at 99F 38 days was max.

    The starvation survival times of the 40's were on bugs without pesticide resistance. Modern anecdotal observations are that the bugs of today with pesticide resistance don't endure as long.

    We still go by the longest times observed though.

    1st instar nymphs that did feed once survived 275 days at 50F and 17 days at 99.
    From the Monograph...all stages fed once before sealing away.

      Life..................Starvation
      Stage................Survival at Temp
      Temp....50F..........65F..........81F........99F
      1...........274.6.......113.6.......27.8.......16.8
      2...........398.9.......171.1.......45.6.......30.4
      3 ..........412.7.......214.4.......71.2.......35.3
      4 ..........432.5.......234.1.......73.3.......37.2
      5 ..........484.9.......161.4.......39.5.......32.6
      AF .......425.0.......277.1.......86.7.......31.9
      AM.......401.9.......175.6.......43.4.......28.6

    If they haven't fed it will be drastically less.

  4. jrbtnyc

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Jun 14 2011 13:52:30
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    spideyjg - 5 hours ago  » 
    Lifespans are dependent on temperature. The longest spans 1 year+ were at 50F and at 99F 38 days was max.
    The starvation survival times of the 40's were on bugs without pesticide resistance. Modern anecdotal observations are that the bugs of today with pesticide resistance don't endure as long.
    We still go by the longest times observed though.
    1st instar nymphs that did feed once survived 275 days at 50F and 17 days at 99.
    From the Monograph...all stages fed once before sealing away.

      Life..................Starvation
      Stage................Survival at Temp
      Temp....50F..........65F..........81F........99F
      1...........274.6.......113.6.......27.8.......16.8
      2...........398.9.......171.1.......45.6.......30.4
      3 ..........412.7.......214.4.......71.2.......35.3
      4 ..........432.5.......234.1.......73.3.......37.2
      5 ..........484.9.......161.4.......39.5.......32.6
      AF .......425.0.......277.1.......86.7.......31.9
      AM.......401.9.......175.6.......43.4.......28.6

    If they haven't fed it will be drastically less.

    But spidey it's important, we've touched on this before, that data was *mean* survival times wasn't it, not *maximum*. According to my understanding it didn't consider the outliers. There are always outliers in any bio population. It's a bell-shaped curve so if you have a whole lot of bed bugs the furthest outliers might live 2x the mean or occasionally quite a bit longer than that.

    In this context it's a gloomy assessment but it's a fact called evolution and it's the reason sexual reproduction is so nearly universal. Sexual reproduction assures a random wide range of characteristics in each bio population so you inevitably get outliers and even occasional "freak" super-outliers. It gives the species a good chance of persisting because in whatever crisis there might be individuals who have some bizarre set of attributes enabling them to survive, so then they become the new ancestors and the species becomes slightly different than it had been. Actually this process goes on all the time, in dramatic episodes at long-term sporadic irregular intervals but also in the day-to-day and year-to-year ordinary existence.

  5. if only

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sat Jun 25 2011 16:45:33
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    it would nice to see range (i.e. 95% confidence interval) rather than average in that data, and what the percentage of outliers were.

    it's the little things in stats that never get reported but mean so much

  6. blargg

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sat Jun 25 2011 17:31:00
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    spideyjg - 1 week ago  » 
    Lifespans are dependent on temperature. The longest spans 1 year+ were at 50F and at 99F 38 days was max.
    The starvation survival times of the 40's were on bugs without pesticide resistance. Modern anecdotal observations are that the bugs of today with pesticide resistance don't endure as long.
    We still go by the longest times observed though.
    1st instar nymphs that did feed once survived 275 days at 50F and 17 days at 99.
    From the Monograph...all stages fed once before sealing away.

      Life..................Starvation
      Stage................Survival at Temp
      Temp....50F..........65F..........81F........99F
      1...........274.6.......113.6.......27.8.......16.8
      2...........398.9.......171.1.......45.6.......30.4
      3 ..........412.7.......214.4.......71.2.......35.3
      4 ..........432.5.......234.1.......73.3.......37.2
      5 ..........484.9.......161.4.......39.5.......32.6
      AF .......425.0.......277.1.......86.7.......31.9
      AM.......401.9.......175.6.......43.4.......28.6

    If they haven't fed it will be drastically less.

    Got any numbers for 100+ degree heat? I've heard they die at 110, 113, 120, 130... not sure what to believe...

  7. spideyjg

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sat Jun 25 2011 22:56:39
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    The thermal death point is 113 for like 90 minutes and the temp climbs the time decreases. Someone posted that recent studies pointed to 125 as the near instant point but the general rule is to go to 140.

    David James did a video on the pactite and the bugs were sitting still until the temp approached 105 and they got antsy.

    Jim


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