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Vinegar To Dry Out Bed Bugs?

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  1. Sleepless in NYC

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Dec 7 2010 2:57:38
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    This probably sounds ridiculous, but my friend told me that he thought that Vinegar would dry out bbs and kill them. Does that sound as ridiculous as I think?

  2. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Dec 7 2010 8:02:18
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    Hi,

    I would stick to 95% alcohol as a contact killer, it's less likely to make your home smell like a fish and chip shop.

    I very much doubt that vinegar or acetic acid would have any residual affect at all.

    David

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bedbug infestations in domestic and commercial settings. The patent numbers are GB2463953 and GB2470307.

    "Astral Entomologist - because so many people say my ideas are out of this world"
  3. cilecto

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Dec 7 2010 9:35:25
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    I really wish we had an exhaustive list of contact killers. This would reduce the panic over getting that "one" chemical that will do the job, if there's already something that works under the kitchen sink. Plus, people could choose what was safest for the surface being treated.

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  4. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Dec 7 2010 10:20:34
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    Hi,

    Its not extensive but you dont need it to be longer than 95% alcohol or 100% water.

    The best contact killer of all is of course sticky tape, dab the bedbug to it and stick it down on a piece of paper along with the date, time and location found.

    Could not agree more with the idea of keeping it simple and cost effective - its also an added bonus if it has no chemical action that they could eventually become tolerant of.

    Hope that helps.

    David

  5. parakeets

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Dec 7 2010 11:03:46
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    At a bed bug conference I went to, the experts said almost anything could kill bed bugs on contact. They agreed the alcohol was a contact killer, but many other things would kill on contact, too. They said this meant that a lot of products on the market that were sold as "being able to kill bed bugs on contact" were no better than alcohol. They said that the contact killers weren't effective for eliminating bed bugs since bed bugs hid so you couldn't see them to kill them on contact and there was no residual effect from the contact killers.

  6. rangichangi

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Dec 7 2010 20:20:48
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    In my desperation to find a bird-friendly contact killer I bought this ELF spray 3 weeks ago - it smells suspiciously like vinegar.

  7. rangichangi

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Dec 7 2010 20:23:55
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    parakeets - 9 hours ago  » 
    At a bed bug conference I went to, the experts said almost anything could kill bed bugs on contact. They agreed the alcohol was a contact killer, but many other things would kill on contact, too. They said this meant that a lot of products on the market that were sold as "being able to kill bed bugs on contact" were no better than alcohol. They said that the contact killers weren't effective for eliminating bed bugs since bed bugs hid so you couldn't see them to kill them on contact and there was no residual effect from the contact killers.

    So would 70% vs. 91% really make a difference? All of the drugstores in my area only carry 70%. At this point in my case contact killers are irrelevant since we have not seen any live bugs in over a week - sprayed my futon frame with the ELF but didn't see any bbs coming out of it.

  8. cilecto

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Dec 7 2010 20:39:12
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    rangichangi - 7 minutes ago  » 
    In my desperation to find a bird-friendly contact killer I bought this ELF spray 3 weeks ago - it smells suspiciously like vinegar.

    That would not be surprising. Many over the counter sprays are based on commonly available ingredients, like detergent, with herbs and spices added. They are probably fine as contact killers, unclear what the oils or spices add. A good way to learn what's in a product is the ingredient panel or the material safety data sheet, on the manufacturers web site, or search the product name and "MSDS". "Sodium Lauryl Sulfate" is detergent. "Acetic Acid" is vinegar.

  9. Sleepless in NYC

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Dec 7 2010 21:31:21
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    Thanks for everyone's input!

  10. rangichangi

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Dec 7 2010 22:45:14
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    cilecto - 2 hours ago  » 

    rangichangi - 7 minutes ago  » 
    In my desperation to find a bird-friendly contact killer I bought this ELF spray 3 weeks ago - it smells suspiciously like vinegar.

    That would not be surprising. Many over the counter sprays are based on commonly available ingredients, like detergent, with herbs and spices added. They are probably fine as contact killers, unclear what the oils or spices add. A good way to learn what's in a product is the ingredient panel or the material safety data sheet, on the manufacturers web site, or search the product name and "MSDS". "Sodium Lauryl Sulfate" is detergent. "Acetic Acid" is vinegar.

    Yep, you are right on both ingredients - I checked ELF's Amazon page and the ingredients are: "NATURAL ENZYMES, SODIUM LAURYL SUFATE 2.97%, NATURAL ENZYMES, filtered water, acetic acid"

  11. nycyn

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Dec 8 2010 0:09:02
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    I buy white vinegar by the gallons when I can. I use it as a cleaner and drain clearer (along with baking soda) for nearly everything really. I don't buy and products such as Mr Clean or Windex or Drano if you get my drift.

    I'm not sure at the moment but vinegar may be a dust mite antedote, again--not sure--and is supposed to be a flea repellant.


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