Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » General Topics

Vacuum Bags - will these suffocate the BUGS?

(19 posts)
  1. aussiebug

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '08
    Posts: 27

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Dec 4 2008 4:42:19
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I have put this comment in another thread but thought I'd give it it's own.

    If I bag with Vacuum bags and include naphthalene will this be useful, or would I be wasting my money, my thoughts on vacuum bags are that by removing the oxygen from where the bugs may be will suffocate them, or WILL it?

    If the naphthalene is in the vacuum bag and the air is sucked out then will the naphthalene only be effective (if it works at all) directly where it is?

    I'd appreciate anyones thoughts on this if they have tried it did it work?

  2. BBcoukHome

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jan '08
    Posts: 1,166

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Dec 4 2008 4:55:44
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    Attempting to suffocate bed bugs is not really a viable idea.

    The jury is still deliberating on the use of napthalene.

    If you want to experiment have a go but at this stage I don't think anyone can offer assurances that this approach will work. It will certainly take longer than a few days to get results.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited
    http://www.Bed-Bugs.co.uk

  3. aussiebug

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '08
    Posts: 27

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Dec 4 2008 9:17:19
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks for the feed back, most of what I intend to "bag" will be left alone for at least 2-3 months

  4. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 10,851

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Dec 4 2008 9:40:33
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    To be sure of death by isolation alone can take up to 18 months.

    I don't use hot strips or naphthalene myself so can't comment on times with those added, we are more than happy with what we have developed in the UK to go down that route.

    David

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bedbug infestations in domestic and commercial settings. The patent numbers are GB2463953 and GB2470307.
  5. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 16,364

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Dec 4 2008 13:53:02
    #



    Login to Send PM

    We do not know how long it takes bed bugs to suffocate. We do know they need less oxygen than you'd think.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  6. hkbugs

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '08
    Posts: 26

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Dec 5 2008 12:30:09
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Maybe this is an anomaly, but the very first bug that I caught died of suffocation in a sealed salsa jar. I was so mortified to find it on my bed that I covered it with a glass martini glass for several hours on top of my bed until I could decide what to do with it. I was really repulsed and didn't even want to look at it. Finally, I transferred the live bug into a salsa jar, put the lid on, sealed it tight, and the little bastard was dead by morning.

  7. spideyjg

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 3,236

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Dec 5 2008 13:09:34
    #



    Login to Send PM

    There must have either been something else in the jar, the bug was on it's last legs, or had com in contact with a poison.

    Marix here has a ziploc baggy full of bugs watching them starve and last she reported they ain't dead after months.

    I'd wager big bucks suffocation did not take that bug out.

    Jim

  8. Marixpress

    member
    Joined: Sep '08
    Posts: 305

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Dec 5 2008 14:01:24
    #



    Login to Send PM

    spideyjg - 50 minutes ago  » 
    There must have either been something else in the jar, the bug was on it's last legs, or had com in contact with a poison.
    Marix here has a ziploc baggy full of bugs watching them starve and last she reported they ain't dead after months.
    I'd wager big bucks suffocation did not take that bug out.
    Jim

    It took approx 2 months for them to die although I can't say for certain if the adult was dead or in hibernation.

  9. yeswecan

    newbite
    Joined: Oct '08
    Posts: 1

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Dec 5 2008 14:08:00
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I kept some bugs in a jar for months without any O2 and they were doing quite fine until I baked them as a test in the Packtite.

  10. hkbugs

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '08
    Posts: 26

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Dec 5 2008 17:53:42
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I knew it. He's faking it. I'm cooking him in the jar.

  11. DieBBS

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '08
    Posts: 42

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Dec 5 2008 20:27:27
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Marixpress - 6 hours ago  » 

    spideyjg - 50 minutes ago  » 
    There must have either been something else in the jar, the bug was on it's last legs, or had com in contact with a poison.
    Marix here has a ziploc baggy full of bugs watching them starve and last she reported they ain't dead after months.
    I'd wager big bucks suffocation did not take that bug out.
    Jim

    It took approx 2 months for them to die although I can't say for certain if the adult was dead or in hibernation.

    Hibernation?? Wouldn't they at least move or something so you know it's dead? I mean I tap mine around in the bottle and nothing...I really think its dead..thoughts?

  12. ineedrelief

    newbite
    Joined: Dec '08
    Posts: 22

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Sun Dec 7 2008 10:15:32
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hey hk... COOK THE LITTLE #@$%&*!....lol

  13. bb_bgone

    newbite
    Joined: May '09
    Posts: 2

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon May 11 2009 22:12:17
    #



    Login to Send PM

    well i've been capturing every bb i've seen. i put them in a plastic jar with a lid. i even punched pin sized holes in the lid, once i saw they couldnt climb up the sides. The first one appeared to be smaller than all the subsequent ones, i caught him between 2-4 am (as with all the others). By 2-4 am the next night when i caught another one the 1st catch was dead. the bigger ones died about 2 days after being in the jar. im starting to think that there are many different mutants of bb's, some more resiliant and vicious than others. idk?

  14. spideyjg

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 3,236

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Mon May 11 2009 22:41:50
    #



    Login to Send PM

    They probably had crossed poison and were on their last legs anyhow.

    Pretty well documented them surviving in captivity.

    Jim

  15. aussiebug

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '08
    Posts: 27

    offline

    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jan 8 2011 21:59:04
    #



    Login to Send PM

    It's a long time since I posted anything on this site as we haven't seen a bedbug for over a year now, it cost us 100s of thousands of $ to get rid of them, we demolished our house and disposed of most of our furniture, pretty drastic sounding I know but BB's weren't the initial reason, but it sure did the trick.
    I hadn't really thought of BB's until last week a news report showed Australian hotels have a real problem, I'm now wondering what the best thing is to do when going away and what to do with my luggage on my return, ie: isolate it in big bags and spray with something before taking it in the house, any travelling tips would be appreciated as destroying the new house is not an option!!

  16. cilecto

    oldtimer
    Joined: Aug '08
    Posts: 4,041

    offline

    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jan 8 2011 22:18:00
    #



    Login to Send PM

    @Aussie http://medent.usyd.edu.au/bedbug/bedbug_cop.htm & http://bedbugcentral.com/shop/products.cfm/bed-bug-travel-guide-lite

    This is an old thread, but...

    What the others said about suffocating bugs in a vacuum bag.

    It was reported two years back (pre-PackTite) that a major NY PCO was advising its clients that items that couldn't be washed or heat treated could be bagged with moth balls (did not specify which of the commonly available types; naphtalene or paradichlorobenzene). That said, the other "bag with fumigant" method, DDVP strips, reportedly requires air circulation to be effective. So, I'd gather from that that reducing air flow in a bag would likely compromise the naphtalene's effectiveness.

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night; nor for the arrow that flieth by day; Nor for the pestilence that walketh in darkness; nor for the destruction that wasteth at noonday. A thousand shall fall at thy side, and ten thousand at thy right hand; but it shall not come nigh thee.
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  17. aussiebug

    newbite
    Joined: Nov '08
    Posts: 27

    offline

    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Jan 8 2011 22:28:35
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks for that I will read through it now

  18. EffeCi

    oldtimer
    Joined: Feb '09
    Posts: 1,937

    offline

    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Jan 14 2011 8:55:45
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I've seen many BBs surviving in a little closed plastic jar for months...

  19. jayb

    newbite
    Joined: Jan '11
    Posts: 6

    offline

    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jan 16 2011 2:24:45
    #



    Login to Send PM

    i captured a lone bed bug i found walking near my bathroom and put him in an empty medicine bottle. he ended up upside down so i was able to monitor its status by its flailing bastard legs. after 2 days he was dead as dead could be.


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

190,970 posts in 29,378 topics over 90 months by 12,671 of 19,927 members. Latest: TheGG, melqtpie, whataretheodds