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Using a Fogger for nonwashables?

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  1. bedbugsinOz

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon May 10 2010 23:39:46
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    I'm still in the process of calling around to see who knows their stuff. I spoke again to the more expensive company and they mentioned treating all nonwashables with some sort of fogger. They also mentioned taking the risk of only treating one room since I have had so few bites and my roomate has none.

    My questions are: Has anyone heard of using fogging to treat nonwashable items like books, etc.? and What's the recommendation for treating one room versus the whole flat?

    I started making calls again because I can't see myself waiting two weeks for the other PCO to come. I'm so stressed that I want it handled right away.

    Thanks again everyone!

  2. Eve

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue May 11 2010 1:27:38
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    I'm sure someone else will chime in about the one room thing. Whether that works depends an awful lot on luck and where the beasties are spending their time taking care of digestion and family life.

    But books I have lots of and for the life of me I can't think of a single way a fogger could possibly reach them if that's where they're hiding. Especially the eggs.

    I believe there is a very large chance that I got my current infestation from a library book because that's where I found the largest collection of various life stages. And these things were making their home right between the pages near the spine. Heat took care of them (6 hours at 150oC) and you could see that they were trying to get to a cooler place near the page edges. But a fogger won't work like that.

    BTW, I firmly believe that if I knew then what I know now and had called a PCO right from the beginning when they were still in that book, there is a 50/50 chance that simply clearing the bedroom and maybe some spray in the livingroom "just because" would have cleared them. The other 50/50 chance, of course, is that the bugs came from next door and simply set up shop in the book (this was my reading in bed book) during the period before I became aware of the bugs and the time I hesitated before finding a live bug (not in the book as it happens). The latency period may have been as long as four to six weeks.

    Eve
    (who hopes that the landlord finds time *soon* to talk to the PCO)

  3. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue May 11 2010 15:46:07
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    bedbugsinOz - 15 hours ago  » 
    I'm still in the process of calling around to see who knows their stuff. I spoke again to the more expensive company and they mentioned treating all nonwashables with some sort of fogger. They also mentioned taking the risk of only treating one room since I have had so few bites and my roomate has none. ...
    My questions are: Has anyone heard of using fogging to treat nonwashable items like books, etc.? and What's the recommendation for treating one room versus the whole flat?

    I have heard some pest firms recommend treating one room. However, I don't think this is generally a good idea. Choosing to do so "since you have had so few bites and your roommate has none" is really kind of stupid, IMO, since everyone knows anyone who claims to know bed bugs should know that some people do not react to bed bug bites, and your roommate may be one of them.

    Even if you have reacted to bites, your degree of reaction is not necessarily an indicator of the severity of the infestation. Every room should be searched and visual evidence must be located, and this is the only way to gauge an infestation. If your pest firm is not aware of that basic bed bug fact, then this is a big warning sign.

    Fogging a space is definitely NOT recommended for bed bugs because it can actually spread bed bugs and make the problem worse. Fogging one room would be no less problematic than fogging a whole house.

    I don't think fogging can be used in an enclosed space to kill bed bugs in your belongings in a reliable way.

    BedbugsinOz,

    Stephen Doggett's website offers this list of pest pros in Oz.

    Those listed in BOLD type are members of the Bed Bug Code of Practice Working Group. One option would be to call the one(s) closest to you. If they cannot do the work, they may be able to recommend someone knowledgeable in your area.

    Section 10 of the Bed Bug Code of Practice gives recommendations for finding a pest manager, and some recommendations are specific to Australia.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  4. cilecto

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue May 11 2010 16:21:41
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    > everyone knows some people do not react to bed bug bites

    Are you kidding, NoBugs?

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  5. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue May 11 2010 19:52:32
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    Cilecto,

    I was out of my mind, temporarily.

    Thanks, I amended it.


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