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Treating Inside Walls?

(8 posts)
  1. Mclauglm

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Mon Mar 13 2017 15:37:03
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    They are back.... I have lost my sanity and come to hold on to the outermost corners of it to get through this again. In the beginning of January, I woke up on fateful Sunday to find bites around my ankle. I had a previous encounter with the vampire, devil-spawn and knew what a bite looked like. I tried to be in denial for the rest of the day. Later that night, I woke up and searched like crazy and found a big sucker on the inside of my bed skirt. I quickly bagged it and hysterically went to the doorman (poor guy). Long story short. The exterminator checked adjacent units during my second treatment (why wait so long, no clue) and found that the guy next door had been festering this blood army. I was treated twice and nothing else was found. I still waited another 2 weeks before putting all my clothing back since the wall I share with the General is my closet. Last Sunday I woke up to two fresh bites and lost my ever-loving mind. I searched and didn't find anything, but immediately got the exterminator to do an inspection. He found one happily, digesting under my bed. In prepping my unit once again, I found 2 more dead ones and one little baby one (on my shower curtain). They are treating later this week. My concern is these hell-spawn have been found in at least 2 other units. They are clearly in the walls traveling from their main nesting site. I'm afraid if the inside of the walls aren't treated, they will outlive the residual from the spray and come back in a few months. My exterminator said "I don't know." when I asked him about this, which didn't grow my confidence in him so I am asking you fine folk.

    Any idea if I am being paranoid or if there is a way to treat the inside of the wall?

  2. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Mon Mar 13 2017 15:54:44
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    Hi,

    Before you rush into treating your walls can you please check with adjoining neighbors. The "find" int he bathroom is a strong indication that one of them is likely to have an issue as the conduits and gaps around pipes and utilities means that they can be spread more easily this way than through a crack in a wall.

    Checking this is more likely to resolve the source of your problem.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

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  3. Mclauglm

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Mon Mar 13 2017 16:59:27
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    The bathroom shared the same wall as the infected neighbor (as is my closet). That is where they have all come from. It is also a possibility that the bug hitched its way in there on me since it the shower curtain is right next to the toilet. That is the wall I'm concerned about.

  4. bedbugsbugme

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Mon Mar 13 2017 23:35:13
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    So has the neighbor been treated and following the steps to eradicate his infestation? If not then this may never end for you I'm afraid. How is the landlord dealing with it?

    I'm not an expert. Just sharing what I learned from my experience.
  5. bugged-cdn

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Tue Mar 14 2017 6:20:31
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    Bed bugs can spread through multi-dwelling units in other ways than walls. Hallways, for one. I know that was a contributor in our 2016 infestation because I found a live bed bug just inside our front door.

  6. Mclauglm

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Tue Mar 14 2017 12:26:51
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    He has been treated twice with heat and spray, I believe. The condo office is trying to get it all cleared up. I say the walls vs. halls because they have spread to units above and below and are only in my apartment along the shared wall (my bedroom and one little guy in my bathroom, whom I'm not convinced didn't hitch a ride from my bedroom). The owner of my condo has agreed to hire someone to caulk the walls (which I will be sure to do only when cleared by the exterminator to do so).

    Verdict on the walls needing to be treated?

  7. barelyliving

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Tue Mar 14 2017 15:01:30
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    I don't know if any PCOs still do this, but they used to drill holes along the wall and put dust in the wall and then patch it up. You could also access the void by sticking the tip of a bulb duster into the wall beside an outlet box when you have removed the cover. Cimexa dist, that is very effective will last for 10 years when undisturbed in a wall.

    Tough situation. There was a study done that concluded that if residents dust the whole interior perimeter of their apartment with DE it reduces the spread of bedbugs, somewhat. Since Cimexa has been found to be more effective than DE, dusting the whole interior perimeter with that would be even better. Follow the safety precautions, but it's pretty safe. You'd probably have to vacuum and reapply occasionally if you were using it as a preventative.

    If it were me, I'd probably try to make sure my neighbors were getting effective treatment. Ask what is being used there and you can get feedback about it here. Hopefully the PCO's are using dust because they are some of the more effective things on the market, especially Cimexa, and they can contribute to a success.

  8. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Tue Mar 14 2017 15:48:31
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    Perimeter dusting is not as logical as it first appears when you take into account how most people introduce bed bugs into their homes, it simply by passes the dust to begin with.

    There may be grounds to apply a thin / light application around doors and pipes/conduits as part of the treatment of heavy cases where you would want to reduce the risk of spreading but injecting into walls and encouraging dust barriers is not as effective as dealing with the source correctly.

    One of my concerns on reading and re-reading this is that if the same PCO is treating and not tackling the risk of spreading they may lack the skills and understanding to manage the issue in the building. While some clients will try to restrict the scope of works of their pest controllers a good PCO will understand why trying to limit peoples knowledge of an issue in a building is a false strategy and that following best practices in terms of automatically screening units next to heavy or persistent cases is essential.

    I think the solution in this case is to focus the efforts on ensuring the source unit is correctly addressed and that there are no other surrounding ones.

    David


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