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Swedish ongoing experience (rather long 1st post - story so far)

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  1. barbafant

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon May 11 2009 11:34:32
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    Hi there. I live in Stockholm, Sweden and I'm battling bedbugs. I am also in the process of moving to a new apartment and of course I'm worried about taking the little critters with me. I will post here and tell about how I'm dealing with this, what methods I will use and how they have worked. Maybe I will also get some tips and advice from you all.

    I got bedbugs in the middle of mars this year (2009). I woke up with itching little bites and since it was not season for mosquitoes I suspected something else. I didn't even think about bedbugs, instead I suspected flies of some sorts.

    My landlord has a contract with a PCO called NOMOR and they came for inspection at Mars 24. After getting bitten and scratching myself for two days, I chose to sleep the two last nights before inspection in another room at another matress. Nobody at the PCO had given me any advice. The PCO guy came and looked and said he saw no signs of insects and it was up to me to decide if he would spray or not. I said no, thinking that the problem had passed. I soon learned better.

    I moved back to my bedroom and got bitten fairly quick. But the PCO at least had explained some of the treatment protocol just in case, that it demandend that I kept on sleeping in the same bed and act as live bait, otherwise the bugs would follow me around the flat (I live in a 2-room apartment + kitchen, bathroom and hallway.) So I stayed in my bedroom and got the PCO over a week later. Not a fun week. I tried topical hydrocortisone but it hardly helped at all, also topical xylocaine with no effect.

    The PCO (a new guy) came and sprayed my bedroom at 1:st of april. He said that maybe I should get the living room sprayed too. The PCO office hadn't said any about this so I hadn't moved the furniture there, so he didn't treat it at that time. He also told me that at some time they had to treat an apartment 10 times. The treatments are spaced 4 weeek apart so that would be 40 weeks... The chemical used in my apartment was called Empire 20 (Chlorpyrifos, is this a pyrethroid?). Protocol was as follows: put all your furniture in the middle of the room. Turn your bed up on one of it's sides. Put the mattress on it's side also. Bed linen is to be washed at +60 C. You must leave room while spraying is done and at least 4 hours after (24 if pregnant, allergic to chemical used or under 4 yo). Spraying is done on the floor along the walls and under the bed (see below for my thoughts on this). When you come back to apartment, put furniture back where it was and keep on sleeping in same bed and room. He also sprayed my computer chair since I spend at least 2-5 h/d in it. Then he told me that at some other client/victim he had found BB's in books in a bookshelf close to the bed. Guess what, I have a bookshelf 30 cm from my bed. And when I slept in the other room those nights the mattress was close to another bookshelf.

    Well, after that I read up and up on BBs and treatments, risks and so on. I tried antihistamine againste the itching and had great success with it. The bites I had disappeared over a few days and I have not felt a single itch since. I honestly don't know if I am still getting bitten... Some AH's are approved for use on insects allergies and some are not, but not beeing tested don't mean that they won't work. I simply bought the cheapest, Loratadin 10 mg, and take one every morning.

    I read online about professional heat treatment and calld NOMOR who said they just don't do that.

    And about the spraying of the floors only along the walls. The PCO explained that the pesticide used works like this: it lies on the floor and the bug is supposed to walk across it and die after some time, up to a couple of days. So the bug has to cross the spray. Why then not spray all of the floor or at least as much of it as possible, why just spray the foot wide part of the floor closest to the walls? Many pieces of furniture are wider than this and if BB's live in that furniture they could just happily crawl down inside the spraybarrier and feed on me and then go back and breed, right? I suppose I should confront my PCO with this simple question but I guess the answer is that that's the way it must be done. (more on this further down)
    I actually called another PCO on 11th May to get a 2nd opinion on this and they said that was the normal procedure. The motivation was that BB's most commonly hides in the bed frame or in the crack between wall and floor. Hmm. Is 'most commonly' really all that has to be taken into account? This worries me.

    I went to Berlin on a short 'working vacation' from 18th april to 25th april. The week after returning home the PCO came for 2nd treatment, at the 28th april. This time (new guy again... no.3) used a different chemical called Responsar (Betacyflutrin, this is a pyrethroid), same procedure as last time but this time he did the living-room also. Next treatment will be about 26-27th of May.

    Well, here come the twist. At 1st of June I move to another apartment. This is very important to me and can not be changed in any way. I'm not gonna count on the BB's being eradicated from my old flat at time of moving. I think there is a risk that BB's could move with me in furniture and other stuff. So I'm drawing up a plan for sanitizing all my stuff before moving. The PCO will not treat all my stuff, furniture, and books etc. They treat bed and sofa but nothing else besides the flat itself. However, a home insurance is included in the rent so I called the insurance company. They specifically stated that the insurance does not cover damages from pests. Then I called the landlord. I explained that I was moving from this apartment to another with the same landlord in a month and neither I nor them would want me to bring with me BBs by accident, i.e. we have shared interests in this. I explained what both the PCO and the insurance company said. Then I said that I was prepared to myself sanitize all furniture and stuff made from solid stuff like wood and metal plus everything that could be machine washed, but that my mattresses and non-washable cushions would have to be heat-treated to be sanitized. He promised me up front to pay for new mattresses and cushions if I did the rest. This was a big stone off my chest since I live on a small budget, on the other hand I have a lot of free time. He also said that I don't have to pay double rents due to some construction taking place after I move, but I can keep the keys to my old flat and keep having stuff there for some time. This makes it possible for me to move in phases. I can't sanitize everything at once so this will also be crucial.

    I have concluded that I don't have BB's in my cellar storage. So I will sanitize what I can live w/o för the time beeing and put down there until moving the first load of stuff.

    My problem at this point is how to sanitize my furniture and my books. Books will be baked in household oven at low heat, I will buy an electric steak thermometer with cord that I will put in the middle of one book and check temps on during. I am worried about destroying my books though. First I freezed them in my freezer but after redaing more I decided that was not a reliable way to kill BBs. After baking the books they will be immediatley put in plastic bags and then down to the BB-free cellar. This will start as soon as possibly so most or all will be packed down in the cellar at day of moving. For furniture I will dismantle as much as possible and then treat the pieces. This will be done in the the living room with plastic on the floor and then I put the treated stuff in the cellar. I am trying to decide between a cheap small steam generator or rubbing down pieces with alcohol. I can't afford a expensive steam generator. I'm reading up on steam right now.
    There is a sauna open för tenant use at the place I'm moving to. I'm thinking about also putting my furniture and books in it for a long run when moving, as an extra precaution. I probably won't get permission to use it for this but I don't plan to ask, frankly. Since everything will firstly be treated one time already and secondly will be packed in plastic anyway, I think there is no risk for me spreading BB's to the sauna. Asking for permission would only get people worried. If my BB's got loose in the sauna they will die anyway, won't they?

    Well, hope you've read this 1st post although it was a bit long. Will keep on posting and reading.

  2. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon May 11 2009 11:45:58
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    More discussions of chlorpyrifos here.

    I cannot comment on the pesticides, but I suggest reading those threads, and maybe a PCO will weigh in on the chemical issue.

    I hope someone who does thermal treatments will comment on your thermal question. I am NOT an expert on this. I do not know how saunas are designed. I think if they are not absolutely airtight, then when they heat up, bed bugs may potentially be able to escape. They key might be in making sure they go from cold to hot so fast, they cannot escape.

    Also, sealed plastic bags should negate that issue. You do need to ensure that the *core* of all items (not just the room) gets to 120 F. This can be tricky with large, or thick, or dense items.

    Anyway, hopefully others who know more about this will comment further.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  3. barbafant

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon May 11 2009 12:13:41
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    Thank you for your fast answer!
    Scandinavian saunas are seldom airtight. Even if I preheat the sauna to say +100 C before putting in my stuff the core won't heat up for some time I recon. So plastic bags for everything it is. Air sealing the sauna with say silicone chaulk isn't gonna get me on good terms with my new neighbourghs
    Core temp I will measure with this http://www.clasohlson.se/link/m3/Product,Product.aspx?artnr=34-6723. Sorry that site is in swedish but it's a steak thermo with a wireless extra readout that I can have outside the sauna. It costs SKR 230 (about USD 30) which is acceptable, since I can use it for other things later. I'll figure out what object has the most mass and place in the center of that, if possible. But the things that I would sauna is only the dismantled furniture. I changed my mind on double-heating the books, once has to be enough.

  4. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon May 11 2009 12:26:46
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    Hi,

    Long post so please forgive the fact that I am picking facts out and replying:

    Chlorpyrifos is an Organophosphate or OP insecticide

    I need to do more research but I know it is not permitted for use in the UK under the Biocide directive and was removed from sale November 2008.

    It is not something that I would recommend for bed bugs as there is a high incidence of people have resurgent bite responses when exposed to it. By this I mean people who's bite appear to reactivate as fresh when exposed to this product. It can therefore make a situation appear to be a lot worse than it actually is.

    With regards the decon of your possessions between the two locations this is frankly one of the most black arts of bed bug control and not many offer this as a service. The best ways to ensure removal are to look at either Vikane fumigation or thermal treatment of all the possessions at once. We sometimes conduct this as a service in the UK using a unique thermal process but the cost of either shipping your items here or replicating what we have in Sweden would be cost prohibitive.

    Failing those options I would suggest that the best approach is to hand inspect everything. Anything with even a single faecal trace on needs to be moved with the greatest of cautions and you really need to ask yourself whether to keep or bin it.

    I will refrain from commenting on your PCO's beyond saying that they are clearly not very experienced at dealing with bed bug issues and are going for the blanket coverage approach rather than the fine tuned machine concept. In their defense developing advanced methods does take time and exposure to the problem which they may not have yet.

    I would always suggest to people to hire experience over all other factors. The best way to look at this is that its your first encounter with bed bugs, you want to feel confident in your pest controllers abilities and knowing that they have done a lot of cases successfully is priceless.

    With regards the use of the sauna I would honestly say it is not controllable enough to do thermal remediation and you would need to sit and calculate the thermal transfer rate to the inside of center of the bags which depends upon what items are inside it. In short thermal is a lot more complex than just sticking things in an oven or sauna.

    Hope that helps answer a few questions.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

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    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  5. barbafant

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue May 12 2009 10:09:26
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    bed-bugscouk - 21 hours ago  » 
    With regards the use of the sauna I would honestly say it is not controllable enough to do thermal remediation and you would need to sit and calculate the thermal transfer rate to the inside of center of the bags which depends upon what items are inside it. In short thermal is a lot more complex than just sticking things in an oven or sauna.

    Thanks for all your answer, it's really helpful.
    But what do you think about using a oven thermometer with a wireless readout, sticking the probe into the object with the most mass? NB. the biggest thing I would heat treat like this is the parts of a dismanteled bookshelf (ikea-kind) and my books. Wouldn't that be a way around having to calculate thermal transer rates? Of course I would add a safety margin to the temps aimed for, like going for +80 C inside temp.
    Also , this is supposed to be a second extra treatment, the first would be hand steamer or alcohol wiping and scratching out crevices.
    I do understand that as a professional you may be reluctant to offer advise that people may misunderstand and misuse.
    I am unfortunately bound to this PCO in that I cannot afford to hire another myself. Also I checked up with AntiCimex (yes, that means 'against BBs') which is the oldest PCO in Swe and they supported NOMORs methods (although I didn't mention which chems thet used), so if I hired them they would just do it the same way. Simply put I don't have an any other PCO to turn to.
    I plan to stop using the antihistamines that stop my itching in a week or two to be able to check if the BB's are still around. I have not seen any for myself yet. I have also put pieces of cardboard between my mattress and bedstand as an inspection/trap.
    Thank you

  6. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue May 12 2009 11:21:39
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    Hi,

    I would suggest that you contact Ikea and ask them at what temperature their glue will melt. I think you will find it is a lot closer to 50 degrees centigrade than it is over 60 which is a good death temperature for bed bugs.

    I would suggest with furniture that the best thing you can do is dismantle it, do a thorough visual inspection at the finger tip level of detail. If you find signs clear them away and leave the item in the old apartment for a few days and re-inspect. Obviously things like bed bugs eggs are very small indeed which is why I say finger tip level of detail. This is not a job that can be done quickly by anyone without 3 or 4 years experience at looking for trace signs (sorry its where the experience part really comes into play). Anything you see can be treated with an alcohol contact killer but knowing how expensive alcohol is in Sweden I would suggest using sparingly.

    I fear you are more likely to destroy the furniture than to treat it if you use a Sauna.

    Interesting comment regards Anticimex, not so long back their website read like an advert for a non chemical treatment option but it did change back a few years ago so I am not too surprised. I would however say that although the approach may be the same between the two companies the results are really in the level of detail that people work at.

    For example many years ago I was called in to treat a property in South London that had been treated 3 times in 2 months by an ex staff member of mine. We used the same products as each other and yet I get a 95% reduction in bite activity in 48 hours and complete clearance in two treatments where the previous applications mustered a 5% reduction in activity in two months based on bite diaries. The other company are no longer in business due in part to the legal steps my client took to get a refund on their fees.

    The point is that its a craft not a process.

    David

  7. barbafant

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue May 12 2009 11:37:39
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    bed-bugscouk - 3 minutes ago  » 
    Hi,
    I would suggest that you contact Ikea and ask them at what temperature their glue will melt. I think you will find it is a lot closer to 50 degrees centigrade than it is over 60 which is a good death temperature for bed bugs.

    The bookshelfs are made af sone kinde of fibreboard with a wood-patterned laminate. I would guess that would withstand +60 C but I will check it out.

    I would suggest with furniture that the best thing you can do is dismantle it, do a thorough visual inspection at the finger tip level of detail. (...) This is not a job that can be done quickly by anyone without 3 or 4 years experience at looking for trace signs.

    I haven't seen any of the signs of BB's like fecal spots et al, so I suppose I'm not up to finding such stuff at all. That's why my idea was to simply alco-wipe all crevices and scratch them out with something. Perhaps a hand steamer would be easier.

    Anything you see can be treated with an alcohol contact killer but knowing how expensive alcohol is in Sweden I would suggest using sparingly.

    Actually I was planning on using denatured etanol/methanol mixture which is cheap at 2-3 euros a litre. I suppose methanol is as good a killer as etanol.

    Interesting comment regards Anticimex (...)

    Well, I actually left out something cause this was so long anyway but here it goes...
    I read online about heat treatment and called NOMOR who said they just don't do that, I got the impression that they don't have the equipment. In several articles I googled, the 'technical supervisor' of Anti-Cimex said that using pesticides alone weren't enough, a dual approach was needed, and that they use heating tents inside apartments where they put all furniture. So with this info I called local Anticimex to ask directly about their usual treatment protocol. But they said that they just use pesticides and that heated tents were an extra service that weren't included in their normal deals and you had to pay quite a lot for it. The head office and the local operation of Anticimex seems to be not in sync.

  8. barbafant

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu May 14 2009 9:01:50
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    090514
    ok, 1st test of baking books in my oven.
    I measured temps in empty oven with temp at lowest possible setting, thermo probe at bottom of oven, temp cycled between +70 C and +114 C
    I put a tray at top rack just under the 'radiators', thermo on top of the tray, temp cycled between +66 C and +97 C. Yes, the temp at bottom of oven was higher, maybe because probe was in direct contact with oven inside.
    The I put a galler in lowest rack and a staple of books I could part with on that, of varied sorts: small old paperbacks, old hardcovers, a newer large paperback with thin bible-type pages (this had the thermo in it). The books I placed at top all had cover pages with a glossy multi-color finish. Thermo in was in thickest book in middle of heap.
    start 06:57 am +23 C
    kill temp 08:41 am +55 C
    oven off 10:20 am +62 C
    books out 10:40 am +63 C
    total time at or over kill temp 2h
    status of books:
    all books show from barely noticable to slight warping. Glossy covers seemed ok. I did not include water tray in this as I thought that may also destroy books. I will bake another batch of 'looseable' books with water tray to compare, probably this evening or tomorrow. I will put the book piles with some distance between them to let air in better.
    Caveat: baking books in an oven is not risk-free. I remained in my home at all times, all doors open to be able to smell if something happens to the uppermost books. I have a smoke detector in my hallway just outside the kitchen approx. 5 m from the oven.
    edit:
    I forgot to mention that after baking the books I put them into a plastic box with a lid. When the box is full enough I will go down to my BB-free cellar and pack the books in a ordinary banana cardboard box. Since those cardboard boxes has been in the cellar since 3 monthos before first bite I have decleared them BB-free.

  9. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu May 14 2009 10:57:41
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    For what it's worth, after I had thermal treatment, the only wood furniture items in my home that were damaged at all were items from IKEA. One bookshelf, one table, and one television stand had the wood trim peel off (as a result of problems with the glue.)

    Since it was IKEA furniture and not expensive, I'm okay with that. My dressers, which belonged to my grandparents and are well made, solid wood, came through just fine.

    I suck at mathematical calculations, but I know the temps were about 140 degrees F, so assuming that IKEA furniture in the US is the same as IKEA furniture in Sweden, at the temps you'd reach in a sauna, you would probably see some of the same kind of damage.

  10. barbafant

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu May 14 2009 11:16:01
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    Yes, I'm mostly concerned about the fibre-board+laminate bookshelves. I read somewhere else that if you don't raise the temperaure with more than 15 F (13.5 C) per hour, laminates have a chans of making it. That would make sense if the problem was that different pieces glued to each other expanded at different speeds and then came unstuck, ie plywood. But if it's the glue between fibreboard and some wood trim / laminate as in our cases, then I guess that the problem is in the temperature in itself? Then it would be about regulating the temperature so it didn't get warmer than needed and to limit the time.
    I would love to hear from someone knowledgeable about wood and materials on this.
    I also wonder, is there somewhere a list of minimum times at various temperatures to ensure killing of BB's and eggs? I've seen some numbers here and there but nothing longer put together.

  11. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu May 14 2009 15:32:59
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    barbafant,

    Start with this comment I posted on the FAQs yesterday.

    It links to Quarles 2007 "Bed Bugs Bounce Back"; on page 3 of that PDF, "A Biology of the Bed Bug" gives this info:

    It is easier to kill them with heat than with cold. Freezing temperatures do not kill them. All stages can survive for at least five days at -10°C (14°F), but all stages are killed by 15 minutes exposure to -32°C (-25.6°F).

    The thermal death point is 45°C (113°F), and all stages are killed by 7 minutes of exposure to 46°C (l14.8°F). Longevity after feeding is greatest at low temperatures: at 10°C (50°F) the average for C. lectularius adults is about 413 days at 27°C (80.6°F), it is 65 days (Usinger 1966; Sokolova 1956).

    (Emphasis added.)

    ThermaPure Heat cites these additional death times:

    Thermal Death - Bed Bugs
    Pest Temperature Duration Reference
    Bed Bug Adults & Nymphs 45ºC (113ºF) 15 Minutes Mallis, 2004
    Bed Bug Eggs 45ºC (113ºF) 60 Minutes Gulmahamad, 2002
    Bed Bug All Stages 46ºC (114.8ºF) 7 Minutes Quarles, 2007

    You could search the Armed Forces Pest Management Board's Literature Retrieval System to check those other references as well.

    I know YOU know this, barbafant, but for anyone else out there, self-treatment with thermal is difficult because the entire item -- to its core -- must quickly reach and maintain the desired temperature. It is a lot harder than one would think.

    Treating smaller items as barbafant wishes to do may be possible if you do your research. (People in the US at least can also use a Packtite).

    However, self-treating your home for bed bugs with heat is NOT a possibility. It may make your bed bug problem much worse, and you may cause all kinds of other problems (fires, damage, etc.)

  12. barbafant

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat May 16 2009 12:05:18
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    That is really great info, Nobugsonme. It helps a lot.
    Based on this I will go for 60 min at core temp over +50 C, measured in thickest book. This is identical to the Packtite, which I can't buy here in Sweden.
    The shorter time and lower temp will probably reduce the warping that happened at first, but most importantly I will be able to bake many more books before I move. I can say that I would rather use a Packtite, I think that my oven is a bit too hot actually.
    About that the temp should rise quickly, why is that? If temp rises slowly, can the BB's survive higher temps? Or is it that the BB's start to move away from the heat? In that case I think my oven is a safe way even if the temp inside the books rises slowly, because the oven in itself gets hot before the books. The bottom of the oven is hot enough that I think it ensures instant kill on contact.
    I should note that all electrical ovens cycle in temp because the thermostat turns the current on and off. When I measured the temp at the bottom of the oven and at the top this was very notable. However, when I measure the temp inside the books I don't notice any cycling at all. I think this is because the temp inside the books never gets as high as the temp in the oven outside even when the oven temp is at its lowest, therefore the books never starts to cool of even when the thermostat has turned the heating element off.
    When it comes to my bookshelves I have dismanteled two of them and wiped them with etanol/methanol, taking care to spray into every mounting hole. Then I wrapped them in plastic garbage bags and taped them shut. I intend to put them in the sauna at the place I'm moving for a while. I will be extremely careful with the wrapping to ensure that no BB's can escape in any way. I will preheat the sauna to try to persuade eventual BB's to stay inside the bags. Temp will be measured locally. All other furniture will be treated the same.
    I must add that without this site and the info I found here, and the tips I would have been at a total loss. I would have either moved and gotten the BB's with me or thrown all away including hundreds of books.
    edit:
    I found something that may be an egg inside one of the books in my living room. I keep it in a small glass bottle to see if it hatches.

  13. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat May 16 2009 12:17:40
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    Two quick replies to this thread:

    First, re: IKEA furniture.

    One table, one bookshelf, and one tvstand had only the trim peel off. I'm sure it was the glue that failed in those cases. After treatment, the only hard thing about gluing the trim back on is that I'm not handy and didn't have clamps to hold the trim to the furniture afterwards. My IKEA furniture wasn't esp. expensive, so I was fine with going to the hardware store to get wood glue and gluing the trim back on myself. If I was a little messy with the glue application, well, I wasn't dealing with hundred year old antiques or anything, you know?

    Second, re: temperature raising rates.

    There's a lot I don't know about that, but I can tell you the one thing a thermal provider told me here on the boards that explained why a particular speed was necessary that did finally get me to understand how thermal can work without just sending bugs elsewhere.

    When done properly, thermal remediation raises the temp enough that bugs will flee into cooler spots when the temp first starts climbing. Eventually the heat will penetrate whatever cold spots the bugs have fled to; however, at that point the external temp is so high that when bugs flee their formerly cold spots that have now gotten warm, they flee into the higher temp exterior and die. There is nowhere cool for them to run.

    I expect that the art part of thermal is partly about figuring out exactly how to raise temps to achieve that effect.

    I don't know how to do so, but there may be something about understanding that that's the dynamic you're going for that answers your question about why raise the temp quickly at the start. (There might not be. I've never taken a real physics class, so what you have here is a literature major trying to understand physical sciences that are well beyond her, but it gives you some more info to work with.)

  14. barbafant

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sat May 16 2009 13:48:55
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    re quick temp raises:
    Then pre-heating oven and sauna seems to be correct. Question if it will be hot enough. I think that one must achieve kill temp in the sauna at floor level and in the bottom of oven before items are brought in , since that is where the BB's will be if they flee the items. So actually the temp of the total area is not raised slowly since it is already hot enough, it is rather the temp of the items that heats up slowly, if it is a pile of books as in my case.
    I think (hope) I am in the clear with my method so far, but please post tips and point out flaws if you see them. I will keep on
    btw, I am getting bitten now, a little. The antihistamine does not completely block the reaction (as I first thought) but lessens it considerably. This otoh means that I probably didn't get bitten for a couple of weeks before. I suppose this doesn't mean much since BB's can wait 5 days between feeding and eggs take some time to hatch and so on.

  15. barbafant

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Thu May 21 2009 12:57:46
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    update: I am getting bites still, maybe ca 10 the last week. Antihistamines are working ok, it still itches but much less than a mosquito (when I'm not on AH's). Actually I'm kinda glad tha AH doesnät stop the itching since that tells me whether the BB's still are present or not.
    I have baked ca 3/4 of all books. I bought a 2nd oven thermo to check temps at two places in the book pile so to be more sure that the temp is over +50 C (122 F) at all places inside the pile.
    On Tuesday May 25th next week I will probably start to move stuff to the new apartment. I will start the sauna treatment of the furniture that I has previously wiped with alcohol. I'll tell you how it goes when I've started.

  16. barbafant

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun Sep 20 2009 14:25:49
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    Well, sorry for not reporting back for so long. I didn't get rid of the BB's, they manged to move with me to new apartment. I was really careful with the cleaning, baking, spraying alcohol, steaming and so on, but still... So chalk this up as an unsuccessful moving. PCO comes and sprays in my new apartment every 3 weeks, they have sprayed 3 times there now. They switched to the most evil chemical available in Sweden, Empire 20 (organophosphate). But that chem will be made illegal in Swe at end of year... Actually, burning all my belongings (exept for computer and what can be washed at 60 celsius and drytumbled) starts to seem a possible solution.
    I sometimes fantasize about capturing some bb's and letting them loose at cityhall or something. Since bb's aren't a big problem in Swe yet, the help one can get is not very good. So if just some people in powe got the problem, maybe things would change... No, just kidding.

  17. BBcoukHome

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun Sep 20 2009 15:25:53
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    Hi,

    Would you mind sharing a log of activity, like a bite diary. The reason why I say this is because there are a lot of cases out there where chemical control does not appear to work and in fact if you look at the specifics you realise that the occupant is coming into regular contact with a source of bed bugs. In such cases it appears that the chemical control does not work when in fact its a constant supply of new bed bugs.

    Certainly after the steps you have taken in moving and the new rounds of treatment I would be strongly considering that path. It is what we call a local source infestation of bed bugs as opposed to situations such as a hotel room exposure which is a single source unless its a room you revisit.

    David

  18. barbafant

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Thu Oct 8 2009 8:35:15
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    hmm, if I underfstand you correctly, it may be that I'm reinfesting my flat with BB's I accidentally pick up from a place I visit frequently? Hmm. There is one such place but since I only am there daytime the BB's would have crawl into my backpack, for example during the hours I am there, in the daytime. Possible, I suppose. But no-one else seems to have gotten bedbugs and there are 5-10 ppl who work there and sometimes sleeps there to. Maybe I am especially 'tasty', other insects certainly seem to think so

  19. barbafant

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun May 30 2010 6:06:16
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    Well, I promised to tell when I won over the BS's, and I have! No bites since early december, thats half a year so I consider my apartment BB-free. But there is still the stuff in my cellar, and I'm not taking the chance by packing all that up. That will stay for one year more, except for a metal cabinet that is easy to sterelize.
    How did I win? I suppose the chemicals the PCO used for so long time finally killed them all. I used (and still use) a enclosure for my mattress. Washed clothes in 60 C for a long time. Nothing else, bu the infestation was never that severe to begin with.
    The source of my BB's is most likely a collectively run coffee-shop where I work sometimes. They have finally (!) gotten AntiCimex there for spraying. I have offered my advice to the guys in the coffee-shop on additional measures (hey, I'm an expert now) but they seem to not really listen, probably just wishes it isn't true. We will see. I'm keeping safe when I'm there. One of the girls there seem to have gotten biten at home... :-/

  20. Allipat

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun May 30 2010 9:18:00
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    Congratulations on your victory!!!!

  21. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon May 31 2010 1:37:09
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    Well done, barbafant, and thanks for coming back to tell us of your success.

  22. barbafant

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Sun Jun 6 2010 17:01:37
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    Thank you! I'm finally getting new furniture after a year of spartan interior decorating, to celebrate.


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