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Study: Tolerance to Silica-Based Desiccant Dusts in Pyreth-resistant strain

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  1. Poiqm

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    Posted 10 months ago
    Sun Feb 19 2017 12:50:30
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    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5198222/

    "At half of the prescribed label rate of CimeXa dust, onset of mortality began to occur after approximately 12 h of continuous exposure, however, the Parramatta (resistant) bugs ultimately took longer to succumb (Figure 2) with a statistically significantly lower rate of decrease (p < 0.001) compared to the Monheim (susceptible) bugs. Interestingly, Monheim (susceptible) strain bugs succumbed after 36 h regardless of the dose being applied, whereas Parramatta (resistant) strain bugs took ≈50% longer to die at half label rate (72 h) than at the prescribed label rate (36 h)."


    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5198222/figure/insects-07-00074-f002/


    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5198222/table/insects-07-00074-t002/

    "5. Conclusions
    This study demonstrates that a pyrethroid-resistant strain of C. lectularius that possesses multiple resistance mechanisms, including cuticular thickening, is mildly tolerant to sub-label rates of silica gel-based dusts.** Despite this, the development and inclusion of desiccant dusts, both diatomaceous earth and silica gel-based, for the control of bed bugs, presents as one of the more promising developments since the bed bug resurgence began. Nonetheless, preliminary evidence that resistance mechanisms derived from underlying pyrethroid-resistance may confer a natural level of tolerance to low doses of such dusts provides an early warning that any new or existing artificial selection in response to the use of insecticides will, inevitably, lead to a genetic change and the eventual manifestation of resistance."
    **[Sub-label rate=" half of the prescribed label rate"]

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  2. mp7ski

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    Posted 10 months ago
    Sun Feb 19 2017 18:33:57
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    Interesting. My biggest problem with this study is that the bugs were continuously exposed to the dusts throughout the duration of the experiment. I would like to see how effective each was if the bugs walked through, say 1" of the dust, and then monitored after that. Reality is that some bugs aren't going to be continuously exposed in the field, while they may walk through it in their travels.

    I am not an expert, any advice I give should be considered as amateur advice and not taken as fact. I mean well with all my posts and try to give back. If you plan on using any of my advice, I suggest doing research into said advice to make sure it is in your best interest.
    Study on Thermal Death Points(pages 18-29 of pdf) : http://www.propanecouncil.org/uploadedFiles/Council/Research_and_Development/REP_12221%20Efficacy%20of%20Heat%20on%20Bed%20Bugs.pdf
    Study on Cimexa: http://www.pctonline.com/article/pct0814-silica-gel-research-bed-bugs/
  3. Poiqm

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    Posted 10 months ago
    Mon Feb 20 2017 18:13:14
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    Agreed.

  4. KillerQueen

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    Posted 9 months ago
    Tue Feb 21 2017 2:01:56
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    mp7ski - 1 day ago  » 
    Interesting. My biggest problem with this study is that the bugs were continuously exposed to the dusts throughout the duration of the experiment. I would like to see how effective each was if the bugs walked through, say 1" of the dust, and then monitored after that. Reality is that some bugs aren't going to be continuously exposed in the field, while they may walk through it in their travels.

    A bed bug does not need to be exposed for long periods of time to dust. Once they get dust on them ... its game over. Each product will differ with kill times but they will die.

    PS ... Cimexa, which everyone has gone crazy over on this site is NOT all that. Does it work? YES. But there are plenty of dusts on the market that work .... Even faster then Cimexa - I used Cimexa but the results take longer than my go to dust, Tempo 1% ... Even prefer Drione dust over Cimexa.

  5. mp7ski

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    Posted 9 months ago
    Tue Feb 21 2017 2:21:36
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    KillerQueen - 13 minutes ago  » 

    mp7ski - 1 day ago  » 
    Interesting. My biggest problem with this study is that the bugs were continuously exposed to the dusts throughout the duration of the experiment. I would like to see how effective each was if the bugs walked through, say 1" of the dust, and then monitored after that. Reality is that some bugs aren't going to be continuously exposed in the field, while they may walk through it in their travels.

    A bed bug does not need to be exposed for long periods of time to dust. Once they get dust on them ... its game over. Each product will differ with kill times but they will die.
    PS ... Cimexa, which everyone has gone crazy over on this site is NOT all that. Does it work? YES. But there are plenty of dusts on the market that work .... Even faster then Cimexa - I used Cimexa but the results take longer than my go to dust, Tempo 1% ... Even prefer Drione dust over Cimexa.

    I was actually doing some reading yesterday that mentioned tempo dust killing 100% of four different field strains within 24 hours, including 2 strains that were pyrethroid resistant which was surprising to the researchers considering tempo contains a pyrethroid chemical.

    I'm all for using a better dust, but my main concerns would be the health factor and how long the dust will last. I know you don't want to breath any dust in or come into contact with it if at all possible, but I have two small girls and while I would attempt to apply it properly in the proper places, it's a fine dust and I'm not a pro so mistakes happen. Also with cimexa, it lasts 10 years if undisturbed, cerious as to how long tempo lasts.

    Also, my gf has a shellfish allergy so anything that contains DE I want to avoid, I'm not certain she'll react but I don't want to chance it.

    Oh, and I'm not trying to steal any of your trade secrets, but I was havin trouble dusting cimexa without it coming out thick. Is tempo easier to work with. I tried using the actual bottle and an accordian style bellow that I figured out a way that worked somewhat but it wasnt the result I was hoping for. Any advice? I'm planning a move soon and want to pretreate the new place with a dust as a preventative measure.

  6. Poiqm

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    Posted 9 months ago
    Tue Feb 21 2017 6:39:32
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    I like the big bulb duster.

  7. Ombugsman

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    Posted 9 months ago
    Tue Feb 21 2017 12:46:32
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    There have been 2 peer-reviewed studies conducted by eminent researchers which included both CimeXa and Tempo.

    In one study, after 24 hours exposure, CimeXa had killed 100% of the BBs while Tempo had killed 73% of the BBs. Alpine Dust killed 46%.

    http://midsouthentomologist.org.msstate.edu/pdfs/Vol8_1/ME14-007pp10-15.pdf

    In the other study focused exclusively on dusts, CimeXa was the only dust which achieved 100% kill in 3 different types of exposures. Most notable, CimeXa achieved 100% kill after very brief exposure where Tempo and the other dusts killed less than 40% of the bugs.

    https://academic.oup.com/jee/article/109/4/1819/2202018/Comparative-Efficacy-of-Selected-Dust-Insecticides

    Most of you are aware of the field test conducted by another eminent researcher in the field Michael Potter which achieved remarkable results in actual infested residences using only CimeXa. Those results were likely because of the ability of Cimexa to adhere to and kill a bug after the briefest of exposures.

    http://www.pctonline.com/article/pct0814-silica-gel-research-bed-bugs/

    CimeXa is safer than Tempo which contains pyrethroid, crystalline silica, and other unspecified ingredients. Tempo may only be sold directly to licensed pros in NY, CT, and SC. I believe noted entomologist Jeff White (who now uses CimeXa) has mentioned that he's always used green dusts like DE because even when applied to cracks and crevices there is the potential for the dusts to escape into open area. The CimeXa label permits the use of CimeXa on open floors to treat fleas so it must be very safe.

    It's very possible Tempo and other dusts laced with pyrethroids and other substances could achieve faster kills than CimeXa after a bug's been wallowing in the product for a period of time. But that second study suggests CimeXa would probably be the more effective overall killer because bugs die after only the briefest of exposure. I think I'd prefer to use the safer product and the one demonstrated in independent testing to be the more effective killer even if it might take a bit longer to kill. YMMV

  8. Poiqm

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    Posted 9 months ago
    Tue Feb 21 2017 16:55:07
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    Thanks for all that information!!

  9. buggygonn1

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    Posted 9 months ago
    Tue Feb 21 2017 18:41:27
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    Good advice. Thanks for doing all the research for me. I appreciate all your input


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