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Study on Thermal Death Points...

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  1. mp7ski

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    Posted 9 months ago
    Fri Jan 13 2017 1:31:02
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    Found a very thorough study on bed bug and bed bug egg thermal death points if anyone was interested. A lot of info and takes a while to sort through it but glad I found it.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.propanecouncil.org/uploadedFiles/Council/Research_and_Development/REP_12221%2520Efficacy%2520of%2520Heat%2520on%2520Bed%2520Bugs.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwisyfDZq77RAhWi6oMKHZMqDl4QFggwMAI&usg=AFQjCNFb-Sqbump0m6KRm_lSjsn8ffzmsg&sig2=7N5fnzoSfM0WbIcH7F9bvg

    Things get interesting on page 18 of the pdf.
    My take away from it was Temps of 122°F and above killed all stages even after short durations of exposure.

    Makes me want to order a packtite!

    I am not an expert, any advice I give should be considered as amateur advice and not taken as fact. I mean well with all my posts and try to give back. If you plan on using any of my advice, I suggest doing research into said advice to make sure it is in your best interest.
    Study on Thermal Death Points(pages 18-29 of pdf) : http://www.propanecouncil.org/uploadedFiles/Council/Research_and_Development/REP_12221%20Efficacy%20of%20Heat%20on%20Bed%20Bugs.pdf
    Study on Cimexa: http://www.pctonline.com/article/pct0814-silica-gel-research-bed-bugs/
  2. Poiqm

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    Posted 9 months ago
    Fri Jan 13 2017 2:14:54
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    Thank you for sharing this.

    I've been using some, ahem, unconventional heat treatment methods and I'm definitely ordering a heat box system, or building my own soon.

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  3. mp7ski

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    Posted 9 months ago
    Fri Jan 13 2017 2:48:24
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    No problem, I'll be buying either the packtite or packtite closet here soon as well. Just curious as to which gets hotter, quicker.

    Also wanted to point out that all bed bug eggs in the study also died when exposed to 113°F for 4 and 6 hour durations. They estimate the exact time based on simple linear regression would be around 194.1 minutes at 113°F for bed bug eggs. I still plan on baking them at 120°F+ for several hours just to make sure.

  4. Poiqm

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    Posted 9 months ago
    Fri Jan 13 2017 3:23:21
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    I read somewhere, maybe here?, that they die very quickly at 180F. I wonder why the heat boxes don't have two settings: kill slowly and go have a beer, or kill now and get on with your day.

  5. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 9 months ago
    Fri Jan 13 2017 7:42:06
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    Hi,

    To answer the technical question the closet heater is the more powerful so it heats up fastest.

    They are a great tool if you can afford to buy / rent one and if they are available local to you.

    I would as always advise caution when researching options, not all that appear the same work the same. I have tested a few and failed more than I have passed. I have also tried to build my own UK version and failed (even when I was just looking for a UK heater to a PackTite closet). It's just not as simple as it looks to get it from 99% reliable to 100%. It's also so deeply frustrating to try and many weeks were spent working on it.

    Hope that helps,

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  6. mp7ski

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    Posted 9 months ago
    Fri Jan 13 2017 7:42:35
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    Poiqm - 4 hours ago  » 
    I read somewhere, maybe here?, that they die very quickly at 180F. I wonder why the heat boxes don't have two settings: kill slowly and go have a beer, or kill now and get on with your day.

    Probably cause the majority of things that people want treated wouldn't respond well to temps that high. It wouldn't necessarily be a quick thing either due to what ever is being treated would take time for its internal temp to approach that temperature. But in all actuality, a temp that high wouldn't even be necessary. I'm sure an instant thermal death point would be around 130-140°F, even less for non egg stages. So yes, a quick kill setting of like 180° F would help bring the internal temo of items uo to instant lethal death point quicker, but would most likely ruin most items as well. I don't recall if that study did an instant death point temperature though. I know they checked after 10 minutes.

    If you build your own box, make sure you buy plenty of temp. probes to be sure there are no cold spots in your box. That's why I'm going with the packtite, they are very reliable and are engineered to eliminate cold spots if used properly.

  7. BigDummy

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    Posted 9 months ago
    Fri Jan 13 2017 11:04:45
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    Also keep in mind that base temps and core temps are very different things. Density and insulation value are also factors to consider.
    The difference between a sock, and a bag full of socks; the difference between some loose papers and a copy of A Farewell To Arms.
    Airflow around the items and returning to the heater are also major points, without proper design you're certain to fail.

    I built an industrial version of a PackTite and have been running it for four years almost daily, so it is possible to make your own. I had the advantage of years of HVAC work prior to building the unit. My t-stats are set to top out at 158, and with only two basic heater units I'm able to get the base temp up within fifteen minutes.

    HVAC/Locksmith/Bed Bug Control for a non-profit homeless shelter and long term veteran housing.
  8. Poiqm

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    Posted 9 months ago
    Fri Jan 13 2017 13:49:27
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    Airflow around the items and returning to the heater are also major points, without proper design you're certain to fail.

    I would love to see your design if you're willing to share. I want to set up something more permanent.

    For the air flow, I was thinking about the polystyrene dome houses which use natural convection to regulate the air temp, and how that might be a good design for a bed bug killing unit.
    http://www.i-domehouse.com/characters.html


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