Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » General Topics

Spraying wall to wall carpet

(9 posts)
  1. nomorebugs

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '07
    Posts: 115

    offline

    Posted 10 years ago
    Sat Dec 1 2007 16:56:03
    #



    Login to Send PM

    A good PCO tells me they will spray the entire wall to wall carpet with a residual spray. This would make sense to me in the philosophy to go all out to get rid of the bed bugs.

    Is this fairly common? Slightly worried about the toxicity but it seems like there is no other option to be effective.

  2. mrbill0626

    member
    Joined: Oct '07
    Posts: 177

    offline

    Posted 10 years ago
    Sat Dec 1 2007 18:42:57
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Sounds like they're determined to get all of them. That's probably why they sprayed wall to wall. If they sprayed a residual poison,it will probably be there for some time to kill any bugs that venture onto the carpet . Talk to your PCO and clarify what they used and whether they will need to spray it again after two weeks. See the bed bugs eggs usually are not killed by the spray and when they hatch out in 10-14 days, the PCO needs to spray again to kill the newly-hatched bugs (nymphs). Unless they sprayed a poison that stays active for longer, in which case the nymphs will be presumably killed by it as they crawl on the carpet. That's how the PCO treated our place recently and they didn't come back after two weeks to re-treat it, so I am assuming that the residual poison has killed any newly-hatched bugs since the PCO sprayed the place.

    Again, talk to your PCO about these questions you have. In my case they told me that after 3-4 weeks the poison wears off and becomes inactive. And after that time all the bugs should have been killed, so after that time we can vacuum the carpet and thereby remove most of the poison and any dead bugs.

    And the PCO probably sprayed poison wall-to-wall to kill any bugs there were in the carpet and it's also a good idea to isolate your bed from the walls because the bed bugs will still try to get to you when you're in bed or even when you sit in a chair. So when they try to get to you by crawling across the carpet, they die from the poison.

    Another things that helps, if you have not already done this,is to paste vaseline all around each of the legs of your bed. Bed bugs can't crawl up through vaseline, so that keeps them from getting up into the bed. Also, get rid of any bed skirt and don't let bed clothes touch the floor.

    Did I leave anything out?

    Hope this helps.

    Mr Bill

  3. nomorebugs

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '07
    Posts: 115

    offline

    Posted 10 years ago
    Sat Dec 1 2007 20:02:39
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks.

    I'm still wondering, is this a fairly common best practice used by good and knowledgeable PCOs? Wall to wall carpeting of bedrooms must be completely sprayed with a residual?

    I think it sounds very reasonable, but I'm still concerned about it. I had my bed treated twice and had no mental hangups with a contact spray. Well I'm a floor person, like sitting and lying on the floor. And I put lotion on the bottom of my feet. I know I'll have to be much much more careful. This strategy sounds reasonable, in fact is sounds good. Bedbugs can only crawl. If they are not on my bed, they must crawl on the carpet (given my bed is not touching the wall).

  4. Bugologist

    member
    Joined: Nov '07
    Posts: 173

    offline

    Posted 10 years ago
    Sat Dec 1 2007 21:43:17
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Terrible idea.

    First off and probably most important, bed bugs do not typically "hang out" randomly on carpet. They for the most part shouldn't be all over the carpet and will more be associated with furniture or the baseboards. Can a bug or egg be here and there, sure, but you don't usually have large portions of a population just hanging out on the carpet.

    If you wanted the spray because of the pesticides residual activity, recent research is indicating that a lot of the pesticides residual activity that are available to us are not as effective as we first though against bed bugs. Many field populations are showing tolerance and resistance to residuals activity. I'm not sure that resistance is overly common, but I know tolerance is from running experiments on bugs we've collected. Basically, pesticides may not be as effective as we first thought.

    If you wanted to address the carpets have them steam cleaned using a commercial grade steamer and telling whoever is doing it to move slow to get as much heat to the carpets as possible (obviously without damaging the carpet). Heat will kill all stages of bed bugs, including the eggs. Residual pesticides have virtually no effect on the eggs.

  5. nomorebugs

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '07
    Posts: 115

    offline

    Posted 10 years ago
    Sat Dec 1 2007 22:43:28
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi Bugologist,

    Thanks alot. I appreciate the info.

    What about spraying the baseboard versus dusting the baseboard? I hope the term is correct, I mean were the wall to wall carpeting meets the wall. Where the floor molding is, but it's not a hardwood floor.

    I've seen some web videos where they spray the baseboard on a hard wood floor. This PCO is saying they will dust the baseboard with what I assume is drione. In another thread, I'll ask what is the technical diff between drione and DE.

    Sorry if I'm beating the pesticide thing to death. It's what the PCOs use where I live.

    Thanks.

  6. currentinsomniac

    member
    Joined: Nov '07
    Posts: 121

    offline

    Posted 10 years ago
    Sun Dec 2 2007 0:23:44
    #



    Login to Send PM

    nomorebugs - When I interviewed PCO's I narrowed it down to two different options for me. There was one who would spray the whole carpet with Gentrol (growth inhibitor) and a residual pesticide. The other PCO would only treat the baseboards with Tempo. (Both would treat the mattresses and couches, etc....where ever we were getting bit). We went with the second PCO because he would come back as often as we needed for a year. (Which eased some anxiety). We had started self treating with a DE and pyrethrin before we hired someone...and followed the directions of treating the baseboards and mattress. However, both with the self treatment and the first two treatments by the PCO we were still getting bit....and actually at an increasing amount. Finally, about 5 days before our third treatment, I decided to treat our entire carpet with the DE/Pyrethrin we had. About three days later we started getting less bites. Now it's been 3 days without new bites. I don't know if the bugs finally got into the residual from the PCO's previous sprays or if our DE all over is what helped. In ways, treating the whole carpet might be overkill, but I think that's what helped in our case. We are also "floor people" so we've had to make some changes here and there. We now sit on blankets laid out and wear socks 24/7 (which I hate wearing....especially in bed). Can't wait until this ordeal is over with so I can have the carpets cleaned and life return to almost normal.

  7. Bugologist

    member
    Joined: Nov '07
    Posts: 173

    offline

    Posted 10 years ago
    Sun Dec 2 2007 1:47:21
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Any pest control company with any sense of label regulations or ethical standards will not treat the entire carpet with DE. I know the label doesn't say you can't but the dust from the twin towers disaster wasn't supposed to cause respiratory distress and kill people either. Over time this probably isn't a great approach.

  8. currentinsomniac

    member
    Joined: Nov '07
    Posts: 121

    offline

    Posted 10 years ago
    Sun Dec 2 2007 19:21:25
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I'm sorry if I confused our self treatment with our PCO's treatment. Our PCO wasn't the one treating all the carpet with DE. I decided to do that on my own because I was so sick of getting bit (more than usual) after two PCO treatments. The label on our DE specifically instructs us to treat both sides of our mattress so I figured it would also be ok to lightly treat our carpets. (Especially since my nose and mouth are closer to my mattress than the floor). I don't plan on leaving the DE there any longer than I find necessary and have taken precautions so it won't come in contact with our skin. And yes, of course, I don't recommend my approach for everyone. I was only saying that was what worked for me. I was trying to make the point that perhaps a PCO treating the entire carpet with his particular chemical concoction might not be such a bad thing since treating our entire carpet was what worked for us in helping get rid of our bugs.

  9. Bistec

    newbite
    Joined: Jan '08
    Posts: 22

    offline

    Posted 10 years ago
    Sun Feb 3 2008 20:08:02
    #



    Login to Send PM

    What ever it takes to erradicate these Vampires is what is good for us.


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

277,613 posts in 45,832 topics over 139 months by 20,182 of 20,985 members. Latest: bbuganxiety, Paseorent, allspiceberry143