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Sleeping with lights on.

(11 posts)
  1. Poiqm

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Mon Jan 9 2017 6:40:07
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    I just can't sleep in the dark since discovering the bed bugs and I sleep with a small lamp on. I have dusted the house with Cimexa, and I have isolated myself from bites at my sitting areas and have a sheet of 4mil plastic over the bed to prevent bites.

    My question is this: By sleeping with the light on am I preventing the bugs from looking for food and traveling through the Cimexa?

  2. BigDummy

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Mon Jan 9 2017 12:35:44
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    When I had my experiments going at the office I would feed my specimens in full light, they didn't seem to mind in the least.
    Nocturnal in the sense that it also happens to coincide with when the majority of mammals bed down and sleep.

    Bird dreams are not admissible in court.
  3. loubugs

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Mon Jan 9 2017 14:07:40
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    Poiqm - 7 hours ago  » 
    I just can't sleep in the dark since discovering the bed bugs and I sleep with a small lamp on. I have dusted the house with Cimexa, and I have isolated myself from bites at my sitting areas and have a sheet of 4mil plastic over the bed to prevent bites.
    My question is this: By sleeping with the light on am I preventing the bugs from looking for food and traveling through the Cimexa?

    The light won't bother them. They feed in light and dark and as BD noted, the host is usually sleeping at night and that's why they evolved night activity so easier to obtain a meal.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  4. FayeState

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Mon Jan 9 2017 15:42:03
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    I read some where that bed bugs are attracted to the kind of carbon dioxide that people give off when they sleep, and not when they're awake. Is that the case? If someone is laying in bed but not sleeping, will the bed bugs wait until they're asleep to come out? Or will they come irregardless?

  5. Poiqm

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Mon Jan 9 2017 15:44:40
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    I have wondered the same thing, FayeState.

  6. Poiqm

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Mon Jan 9 2017 15:49:38
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    Thanks for the responses. I had read that they will feed in the light when the opportunity arises. I'm wondering if they will actively crawl around the house in the light though, for example if the harborage is in a wall will they crawl across the floor to the bed if the light is on?

  7. BigDummy

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Mon Jan 9 2017 16:02:05
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    If they are hungry they will feed. Sleep is not necessary, you exhale regardless of conscious state.

  8. yohoki

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Mon Jan 9 2017 18:21:22
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    FayeState - 2 hours ago  » 
    I read some where that bed bugs are attracted to the kind of carbon dioxide that people give off when they sleep, and not when they're awake. Is that the case? If someone is laying in bed but not sleeping, will the bed bugs wait until they're asleep to come out? Or will they come irregardless?

    I can tell you, they don't care if it's night, or if you're awake or not. In my house, the swarms do become more active at night, but that's only because we're all still easier targets. They still attack during the day with the lights on, though. Even more, I sleep with a large lamp on because it's easier to change the baby and what not. They don't seem to notice the lamp at all.

    Notable sites for my reference (and others that are interested):
    http://www.pctonline.com/article/pct0814-silica-gel-research-bed-bugs/
    http://www.bed-bugs.co.uk/tbypmr.pdf (PDF file. May prompt download)
    Http://www.bed-bugs.co.uk/ (David's company website.)
    Http://www.bedbugger.com/forum/
  9. Poiqm

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Mon Jan 9 2017 21:01:47
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    I read your thread, Yohoki, it's a living nightmare what you're going through. I sure hope the Cimexa is killing the bugs all dead! I tried to let you know about how I put 4mil plastic sheeting over the mattress to prevent bites but my posts weren't appearing.

  10. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Tue Jan 10 2017 9:44:27
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    Hi,

    Sleeping on plastic is not a good idea because it further lowers the quality of the sleep that you do get. This lack of sleep and reduction in quality can quickly impact your ability to function at "normal" efficiency and tired people tend to make more mistakes and jump to conclusions more readily than those who are in sleep balance.

    There is also a lot of history connected with plastic sheet methods which is best avoided as it goes from civil to heated quickly when the spammers arrive.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

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    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  11. Norestnosleepnopeace

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Wed Jan 11 2017 0:16:48
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    Bed bugs apparently don't actually like light, but no it won't stop them. The good thing about my sleeping with a light on is that if a bite wakes me up out of a deep sleep the way they do, I can see what's biting me and kill it! In the dark they'd have more of a chance to get away if I had to jump out of bed and scramble to turn a light on.


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