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Skin reactions caused by other bugs

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  1. Bayonnebedbug

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Mon Mar 18 2013 11:27:48
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    Hi
    I had a question what other type of bugs can cause a skin reaction that reassemble a bed bug bite?
    I have read the hairs from a Capet beetle could but what other bugs (not inculding fleas) have the potential to make a person have a skin reactions?

    Silverfish?

    Thanks
    Rob

  2. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Mon Mar 18 2013 12:10:17
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    Hi,

    You need to look at this as known bitters and known reaction causers and to keep the classification open as not all biters / reaction causers are insects:

    Known biters

    Bedbugs
    Fleas
    Mosquitoes
    Bird mites
    Kissing bugs
    Gnats / midges

    Reaction causers

    Dust mites
    Carpet beetles
    Cable / paper mites

    The reaction causers group tend to be allergy related so in a very small number of cases you need to consider "chitin hypersensitivity" of the allergic reaction caused by the presence of the material that insect exoskeletons are made of.

    That will at least get the list started.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bedbug infestations in domestic and commercial settings. The patent numbers are GB2463953 and GB2470307.

    "Open minds find faster solutions"

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  3. NorthEast

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Mon Mar 18 2013 14:18:23
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    those paper and cable mites are the hardest to capture and ID

  4. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Mon Mar 18 2013 15:15:39
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    Hi NorthEast,

    I have a handheld static meet that is supposed to help but it appears to have the same sucess rate as the electronic dog nose.

    David

  5. NorthEast

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Mar 19 2013 6:38:11
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    Hi David,

    I had heard of paper mites, but never cable mites- had to go to the Mallis Handbook of Pest Control to find out what they were. I'll post it here for everyone, it's interesting:

    The condition of "cable mites" is not related to mites at all. It is actually a skin irritation caused by splinters from fabric-covered wires or cables. This condition was quite prevalent in the days of switchboard operators, and complaints of "cable mites" still occur in spite of today's high-tech telecommunication systems with buttons instead of cables (Ebeling 1978)

  6. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Mar 19 2013 6:48:26
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    Hi NorthEast,

    In the EU we use paper and cable as interchangeable terms because essential they are not static charge issues.

    One of the things we noticed in about 2006 is that often insecticide appears to resolve these issues for a few days as the ionic natural of suspended insecticide solutions means that they neutralise the pockets of static. However as the effect is only temporary it usually returns by the 3rd or 4th day.

    As stated I do have a handheld static meter but when I first used it I found the data it produced to be so devoid of logic that it just sits in the cupboard. That and the fact that although small many of these particles are still visible under certain lighting conditions so I prefer to go the low tech route to solving them.

    David

  7. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Mar 19 2013 8:39:09
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    You might want to add to the list Colembola also known as springtails. Lou Sorkin was part of the research on this which was published a few years back.

  8. theyareoutthere

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Mar 19 2013 20:22:23
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    There was an interesting article on cable mites. I'll have to find it.

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  9. theyareoutthere

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Mar 19 2013 20:28:05
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    I can't find the one from 2009-2010 that talks about pest control companies being almost "forced" to spray in some office buildings because of "bites". I found this on a pest control website, and it's similar -

    Many environmental factors can contribute to irritations and biting sensations:

    Carpets: Fibers from synthetic carpets, particularly flimsy, nylon-based carpets, can “leap” onto the legs of office workers. The fibers can feel like pinpricks or bites, and can actually puncture the skin, especially if the person’s skin is dry. Women who wear nylons and sandal-type heels have higher static electricity around their legs and feet and are most likely to attract the fibers.

    Paper Splinters and Particles: Stacks of paper, multi-part forms, computer cards, and continuous forms produce paper splinters that can cause bite-like sores, rashes, or itching. So too can small pieces of wire insulation, carbon, and particle board. This is where “paper mite” and “cable mite” infestations got their name.

    Static Electricity: High levels of static electricity can make carpet fibers, particles, and paper splinters “jump” to oppositely-charged arms or legs. Nylon rugs generate static electricity when people walk or roll their chairs. Electrical equipment such as radios, terminals, consoles, and computers also generate static.

    Low Humidity: Low humidity increases static electricity and the movement and effect of paper splinters, carpet fibers, and other particles, and aggravates dry skin as well.

    Ventilation: Filters from heating and air conditioning systems, and fiberglass insulation around ductwork, sometimes release fibers that cause “bites” and irritation. New filters often release fibers for a few days after installation. Dead spots in air flow within a room may increase skin irritation and the feeling that one is being bitten.

    Indoor Air Pollutants: Modern buildings with closed ventilation systems sometimes have periodic high levels of chemical pollutants such as formaldehyde and resins. Some of these can cause skin irritations or allergic reactions.

    Insecticide Treatment: Repeated insecticide applications may increase workers’ skin irritation and sensitivity to other environmental factors. (There is a “Catch-22″ here. Office managers may insist on repeated insecticide treatments. Sometimes an area gets short-term relief from “bites” caused by fibers or other physical irritants after it has been sprayed because (1) sprays or fogs can carry dust and fiber particles down into the carpet, and (2), sprays add moisture to the air and lower static electricity levels. But these effects are short-term, and the repeated exposures may increase the skin problems.)

    Weekends Outdoors: Workers may be bitten on weekend picnics or other outdoor activities. Mosquito, fly, chigger, or flea bites may not show up for several hours, and in fact may be noticed first at work where they are blamed on “bugs in the office.” Workers may pick up head lice from their children.

    Bell’s Syndrome: This syndrome demonstrates the “power of suggestion.” When one person in a group feels an itch or biting sensation or irritation, and begins to talk about it or to scratch, others in the group soon follow suit. It is a very powerful suggestion, difficult to ignore. When one person in an office talks about “bites,” it will likely influence others.

    Nine out of ten times, the “bites” turn out to be something else, usually a combination of environmental conditions and physical factors that cause skin irritation that mimic bug bites perfectly, often complete with bumps and swellings. But one out of ten times, actual pests are the cause. As a professional pest management expert, I always recommend that you have a thorough pest inspection of your property to make the determination.

  10. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Mar 19 2013 22:09:36
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    This green sticky also lists some possible offenders.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."

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