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Self styled heat treatment?

(15 posts)
  1. paranoidinlv

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Sep 21 2009 22:30:07
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    I'm thinking of "experimenting" with a heat treatment in my girls' room. I'm thinking (theoretically) that I can get my family's space heaters, block the vent, open the blinds, stuff towels under the door and heat the room up to +120 degrees. I live in Las Vegas, NV, and it's still getting in the 90's here so I'm thinking this may work. Any thoughts/suggestions from more experienced members?

  2. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Sep 21 2009 23:14:18
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    I am not an expert on this, but as I understand it, DIY heat treatment is not easy or probably a good thing to experiment with.

    From what I understand, the temperature needs to rise quickly in order to kill bed bugs before they migrate (i.e. move to other rooms, deep into your walls, etc.) You could actually make things worse. There may also be fire risks.

    U Florida has apparently perfected a little bed bug killing chamber for heating STUFF in your room, but that's really a different thing (like creating an enclosed structure in part of the room). If you wanted to try this, I would do a lot of research on it first.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  3. jroddz

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Sep 22 2009 11:09:38
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    paranoidinlv - 12 hours ago  » 
    I'm thinking of "experimenting" with a heat treatment in my girls' room. I'm thinking (theoretically) that I can get my family's space heaters, block the vent, open the blinds, stuff towels under the door and heat the room up to +120 degrees. I live in Las Vegas, NV, and it's still getting in the 90's here so I'm thinking this may work. Any thoughts/suggestions from more experienced members?

    You don't want to start a fire in your house because of bedbugs. That would be worse than the original problem.

  4. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Sep 22 2009 11:40:44
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    Thermal treatment generally relies on raising the temps at a very particular rate of speed. As one thermal PCO explained it, you have to get the temp hot enough fast enough that the bugs will flee the heat into cooler spaces. Then you have to keep raising the temp enough that the heat eventually reaches those spaces, leaving the bugs with no option but to leave those spaces and jump into the even hotter spots where they die.

    Thermal providers use massive heaters to take the temps throughout every nook and cranny of the structure up to the death point. Because of the insulating properties in many household items, it's virtually impossible to self treat with thermal. It's also terribly dangerous. With professional thermal treatment, there are PCOs who walk through in advance and check the structure for hazards that might cause fires or other problems . Throughout the treatment, PCOs continue to walk through to monitor the temperature both to make sure that temps are being raised at the proper rates and that there are no hazardous situations developing as a result of the heat.

    I'm a big fan of thermal treatment. But it's best left to the professionals. Trying to do it on your home can not only make the problem worse (because the bugs may flee the heat, spreading the infestation throughout more of the home), but may create very hazardous conditions in terms of fire hazards.

    I wouldn't try it. The risks are just too high.

    Also, most spaces heaters have cut off switches that will shut them off when temperatures get too high. They probably won't run in a room that hot. This is a safety mechanism to reduce fire hazard. And if they don't, then I would definitely not run them in a hot room because the fire risks are much too great. Burning your home down will get rid of bed bugs, but at a pretty high cost.

  5. paranoidinlv

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Tue Sep 22 2009 14:50:29
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    *Sigh* - this is why I posted rather than experimenting first. I hadn't considered the *$%@&! bugs moving because the heat didn't get hot enough fast enough.......
    Thanks for the insight - and the warnings!

  6. cilecto

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Sun Sep 27 2009 0:45:43
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    A good "thermal" operator has either been trained on how to do it right or has learned how by experimentation, trial and error, etc. With your house, you get one shot.

    The U of F experimental (note that) approach does not heat the whole room. They move objects to the center of the room and heat them in a structure they put up. The perimeter of the room is treated with chemicals and dessicants. Note that they do this in relatively uniform dorm rooms, with "indestructable" smooth vinyl floors. Here's how they did it.
    http://ipm.ifas.ufl.edu/resources/grants_showcase/people_and_communities/bed_bugs_manual.pdf

    I'm hoping that this approach can be successfully "commercialized", as it can help save a lot of beds and couches. But, as noted above, it's different and risky in your own home.

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  7. cilecto

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Oct 23 2009 18:52:37
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    Since "SoCal" is pointing readers to this thread, I'd like to add that there are at least two recent stories about facilities on Vancouver, who have built "hot rooms", at least one outside the building, for heat treating contents, but not the structures themselves.

  8. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Fri Oct 23 2009 20:39:11
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    HeatByMe - 4 weeks ago  » 
    So why not get a forced-air propane (or kerosene) heaters such as the following?
    http://www.heatershop.com/propane_forced_air_125_fac.html
    This will surely raise the temperature high enough throughout the entire house. Obviously the homeowner would have to be careful to to burn the house down and, more importantly, not to asphyxiate him/herself.
    I'm thinking about doing this in my own house.

    HeatByMe --

    I realize this is delayed but in case you or others see it --

    I really would not experiment with this unless you know what you're doing.

    In my understanding, thermal service providers are not just trying to kill your bed bugs, they're also trying not to damage your stuff (or burn the house down, as others noted).

    Besides, I guess you'd presumably need a LOT of those heaters to get the whole place to the same temp FAST, and at $200 a pop, how many do you buy before it's more economical to let someone come in and do it for you, and do a safe and effective job?

  9. spideyjg

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Nov 23 2009 16:44:10
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    Sweet Jesus are you mad?

    OK forgetting the fire risk any burner creates cabon monoxide which will kill.

    For Christ sake nobody try this!

    Jim

  10. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Nov 23 2009 17:36:54
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    Bedbug1,

    I am sorry, but I had to delete your post.

    As you said, your DIY home treatment with propane tanks and fans is potentially dangerous. What's more, you admitted it did NOT eliminate your bed bug problem.

    I removed it because people may harm themselves and also because it may not work anyway.

    Please leave thermal heat treatments to the pros. If you must experiment, please be cautious.

    Bedbug1, I hope you'll understand why your post was deleted.

  11. BBcoukHome

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Nov 23 2009 18:01:40
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    I think this concept sums it up well.

    I was talking to someone the other day who proclaimed themselves to be a bed bug specialist because of all the material they had read on the previous four days. At this point I stopped and asked them what they did for a living. It was a trained medical type job although not in traditional medicine. They were a little perplexed to ask me if they would allow me to treat them if I had spent the same amount of time reading up on the subject on-line. In fact when I pushed the point they admitted they were not sure how new people entered their profession given the fact that she took years of practising to get it right.

    As others have pointed out professionals also have to climb that learning curve to get good, skilled and reputable in their field.

    One of the reasons why professional or non chemical treatments are generally recommended on forums like this is partly the fact that you don't want to make many of these avoidable mistakes yourself. I have seen far too many wrong things done in the sake of speed or penny pinching to even be in doubt of the need for experience.

    I don't do heat thermal myself so its not an area I can technically comment about other than to say when I do get into it I think the answer is in control and to that end I can only see it as being an extremely labour intensive prep before anything starts and a very gradual slow down again.

    If you wish to climb the learning curve good luck on your journey and for the love of god please don't use anything with a naked flame because your feedback would be appreciated and the fire department will thank you.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

  12. Bedbug1

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Mon Nov 23 2009 23:07:28
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    Nobugsonme, not a problem, I kind of figured tht it would be removed and that's why I kept putting in the warnings, won't make that mistake again

  13. bait

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Nov 24 2009 0:26:09
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    I read your post, cursorily, B4 it was removed.

    Other risks mentioned in previous threads by various bedbuggers: release of (chemical change) asbestos, formaldehyde and carbon monoxide.

  14. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 8 years ago
    Tue Nov 24 2009 2:24:39
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    And I believe we've also been told that thermal -- done improperly -- may cause bed bugs to flee more deeply into the structure, rather than killing them.

    My understanding is it's not just the temperature you hit, but how quickly.

  15. sixty7flh

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Jan 14 2015 21:01:12
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    Some times I wonder?

    You don't want to start a fire in your house because of bedbugs. That would be worse than the original problem.


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